Tycho N. Huussen

The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California, United States

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Publications (5)10.87 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: This song is sung to the tune of ‘Couldn't Get It Right'. I really need to figure out how to link this to You-Tube. This article (1) reviews and clarifies the basic physics underpinning finescale parameterizations of turbulent dissipation due to internal wave breaking, and (2) provides advice on the implementation of the parameterizations in a way that is most consistent with the underlying physics, with due consideration given to common instrumental issues. Potential biases in the parameterization results are discussed in light of both (1) and (2), and illustrated with examples in the literature. The value of finescale parameterizations for studies of the large-scale ocean circulation in the presence of common biases is assessed. We conclude that the parameterizations can contribute significantly to the resolution of large-scale circulation problems associated with plausible ranges in the rates of turbulent dissipation and diapycnal mixing spanning an order of magnitude or more
    Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans 12/2013; · 3.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Indian Ocean hosts a vigorous basin-scale overturning that constitutes one of the major deep upwelling branches of the global meridional overturning circulation (MOC). The extent to which the deep Indian Ocean MOC is sustained by breaking internal waves is assessed by quantifying and comparing the energetics of the overturning and those of the regional internal wave field. A range of published inverse estimates of the circulation across 32°S is used to assess the basin average buoyancy fluxes. The turbulent dissipation needed to sustain the MOC ranges between 0.17 ± 0.04 and 1.19 ± 0.17 TW, which is consistent with the estimated 0.35-0.26+1.04 TW dissipated by breaking internal waves, as inferred from observed fine structure. Both estimates of turbulent dissipation are consistent with the total energy input into the regional internal wave field (0.21-0.05+0.08 TW) based on published estimates of energy conversion from winds, tides and geostrophic bottom flows. However, a discrepancy arises when comparing the energetics at different density levels. At mid-ocean density levels (˜1000-3000 m) the dissipation of internal wave energy is found to be significantly smaller (factor 5-10) than the dissipation needed to sustain inverse estimates of the MOC. The uncertainty related to undersampling of internal wave breaking hot spots was analyzed and found to be small, which suggests that mixing processes other than wave breaking due to weak wave-wave interactions, may be significant in the deep Indian Ocean.
    Journal of Geophysical Research Atmospheres 08/2012; 117(C8):C08024. · 3.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present new results on an optical implementation of Grover's quantum search algorithm. This extends previous work in which the transverse spatial mode of a light beam oscillates between a broad initial input shape and a highly localized spike, which reveals the position of the tagged item. The spike reaches its maximum intensity after $\sim\sqrt N$ round trips in a cavity equipped with two phase plates, where $N$ is the ratio of the surface area of the original beam and the area of the phase spot or tagged item. In our redesigned experiment the search space is now two-dimensional. In the time domain we demonstrate for the first time a multiple item search where the items appear directly as bright spots on the images of a gated camera. In a complementary experiment we investigate the searching cavity in the frequency domain. The oscillatory nature of the search algorithm can be seen as a splitting of cavity eigenmodes, each of which concentrates up to 50% of its power in the bright spot corresponding to the solution. Comment: 16 pages in preprint format, 6 figures v2: some minor revisions
    Journal of the Optical Society of America B 05/2006; · 2.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We demonstrate a new and efficient laser-locking technique that enables making large frequency jumps while keeping the laser in lock. A diode laser is locked at a variable offset from a Doppler-free spectral feature of rubidium vapor. This is done by frequency shifting the laser before sending the light to a spectroscopy cell with an acousto-optic modulator (AOM). The frequency of the locked laser is switched quasi-instantaneously over much more than the width of the spectral features, i.e., the usual locking range. This is done by simultaneously switching the AOM frequency and applying feed-forward to the laser current. The advantage of our technique is that power loss and beam walk caused by the AOM do not affect the main output beam but only the small fraction of light used for the spectroscopy. The transient excursions of the laser frequency are only a few MHz and last approximately 0.2ms, limited by the bandwidth of our locking electronics. We present equations that describe the transient behavior of the error signal and the laser frequency quantitatively. They are in good agreement with the measurements. The technique should be applicable to other types of lasers.
    Applied Physics B 12/2003; 78(1):19-23. · 1.78 Impact Factor
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