Michael J. I. Brown

Monash University (Australia), Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

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Publications (72)345.51 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We present the mid-infrared (IR) star formation rates of 245 X-ray selected, nearby (z<0.1) brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). A homogeneous and volume limited sample of BCGs was created by X-ray selecting clusters with L_x > 1x10^44 erg/s. The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) AllWISE Data Release provides the first measurement of the 12 micron star formation indicator for all BCGs in the nearby Universe. Perseus A and Cygnus A are the only galaxies in our sample to have star formation rates of > 40 M_sol/yr, indicating that these two galaxies are highly unusual at current times. Stellar populations of 99 +/- 0.6 % of local BCGs are (approximately) passively evolving, with star formation rates of <10 M_sol/yr. We find that in general, star formation produces only modest BCG growth at the current epoch.
    07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We present a maximum-likelihood weak lensing analysis of the mass distribution in optically selected spectroscopic Galaxy Groups (G3Cv1) in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, using background Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometric galaxies. The scaling of halo mass, $M_h$, with various group observables is investigated. Our main results are: 1) the measured relations of halo mass with group luminosity, virial volume and central galaxy stellar mass, $M_\star$, agree very well with predictions from mock group catalogues constructed from a GALFORM semi-analytical galaxy formation model implemented in the Millennim $\Lambda$CDM N-body simulation; 2) the measured relations of halo mass with velocity dispersion and projected half-abundance radius show weak tension with mock predictions, hinting at problems in the mock galaxy dynamics and their small scale distribution; 3) the median $M_h|M_\star$ measured from weak lensing depends more sensitively on the dispersion in $M_\star$ at fixed $M_h$ than it does on the median $M_\star|M_h$. Our measurements suggest an intrinsic dispersion of $\sigma_{\log(M_\star)}\sim 0.15$; 4) Comparing our mass estimates with those in the catalogue, we find that the G3Cv1 mass can give biased results when used to select subsets of the group sample. Of the various new halo mass estimators that we calibrate using our weak lensing measurements, group luminosity is the best single-proxy estimator of group mass.
    04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We investigate the relationship between colour and structure within galaxies using a large, volume-limited sample of bright, low-redshift galaxies with optical to near-infrared imaging from the GAMA survey. We fit single-component, wavelength-dependent, elliptical S\'ersic models to all passbands simultaneously, using software developed by the MegaMorph project. Dividing our sample by S\'ersic index and colour, the recovered wavelength variations in effective radius (R_e) and S\'ersic index (n) reveal the internal structure, and hence formation history, of different types of galaxies. All these trends depend on n; some have an additional dependence on galaxy colour. Late-type galaxies (n_r < 2.5) show a dramatic increase in S\'ersic index with wavelength. This might be a result of their two-component (bulge-disk) nature, though stellar population gradients within each component and dust attenuation are likely to play a role. All galaxies show a substantial decrease in R_e with wavelength. This is strongest for early-types (n_r > 2.5), even though they maintain constant n with wavelength, revealing that ellipticals are a superimposition of different stellar populations associated with multiple collapse and merging events. Processes leading to structures with larger R_e must be associated with lower metallicity or younger stellar populations. This appears to rule out the formation of young cores through dissipative gas accretion as an important mechanism in the recent lives of luminous elliptical galaxies.
    04/2014; 441(2).
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    ABSTRACT: We present results from modeling the optical spectra of a large sample of quiescent galaxies between 0.1<z<0.7 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES). We examine how the stellar ages and abundance patterns of galaxies evolve over time as a function of stellar mass from 10^9.6-10^11.8 Msun. Galaxy spectra are stacked in bins of mass and redshift, and modeled over a wavelength range from 4000 A to 5500 A. Full spectrum stellar population synthesis modeling provides estimates of the age and the abundances of the elements Fe, Mg, C, N, and Ca. We find negligible evolution in elemental abundances at fixed stellar mass over roughly 7 Gyr of cosmic time. In addition, the increase in stellar ages with time for massive galaxies is consistent with passive evolution since z=0.7. Taken together, these results favor a scenario in which the inner ~0.3-3 Re of massive quiescent galaxies have been passively evolving over the last half of cosmic time. Interestingly, the derived light-weighted ages are considerably younger than the age of the Universe at all epochs, suggesting an effective single-burst star formation epoch of z<1.5. These young stellar population ages coupled with the existence of massive quiescent galaxies at z>1 indicate the inhomogeneous nature of the z<0.7 quiescent population. The data also permit the addition of newly-quenched galaxies at masses below ~10^10.5 Msun at z<0.7. Additionally, we analyze very deep Keck DEIMOS spectra of the two brightest quiescent galaxies in a cluster at z=0.83. There is tentative evidence that these galaxies are older than their counterparts in low-density environments. In an Appendix, we demonstrate that our full spectrum modeling technique allows for accurate and reliable modeling of galaxy spectra to low S/N and/or low spectral resolution.
    03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We report the morphological classification of 3727 galaxies from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly survey with M_r < -17.4 mag and in the redshift range 0.025 < z < 0.06 (2.1 x 10^5 Mpc^3 ) into E, S0-Sa, SB0-SBa, Sab-Scd, SBab-SBcd, Sd-Irr and little blue spheroid classes. Approximately 70% of galaxies in our sample are disk dominated systems, with the remaining ~30% spheroid dominated. We establish the robustness of our classifications, and use them to derive morphological-type luminosity functions and luminosity densities in the ugrizYJHK passbands, improving on prior studies that split by global colour or light profile shape alone. We find that the total galaxy luminosity function is best described by a double-Schechter function while the constituent morphological-type luminosity functions are well described by a single-Schechter function. These data are also used to derive the star-formation rate densities for each Hubble class, and the attenuated and unattenuated (corrected for dust) cosmic spectral energy distributions, i.e., the instantaneous energy production budget. While the observed optical/near-IR energy budget is dominated 58:42 by galaxies with a significant spheroidal component, the actual energy production rate is reversed, i.e., the combined disk dominated populations generate ~1.3x as much energy as the spheroid dominated populations. On the grandest scale, this implies that chemical evolution in the local Universe is currently confined to mid-type spiral classes like our Milky Way.
    01/2014; 439(2).
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    ABSTRACT: We present an atlas of 129 spectral energy distributions for nearby galaxies, with wavelength coverage spanning from the UV to the mid-infrared. Our atlas spans a broad range of galaxy types, including ellipticals, spirals, merging galaxies, blue compact dwarfs and luminous infrared galaxies. We have combined ground-based optical drift-scan spectrophotometry with infrared spectroscopy from Spitzer and Akari, with gaps in spectral coverage being filled using MAGPHYS spectral energy distribution models. The spectroscopy and models were normalized, constrained and verified with matched-aperture photometry measured from Swift, GALEX, SDSS, 2MASS, Spitzer and WISE images. The availability of 26 photometric bands allowed us to identify and mitigate systematic errors present in the data. Comparison of our spectral energy distributions with other template libraries and the observed colors of galaxies indicates that we have smaller systematic errors than existing atlases, while spanning a broader range of galaxy types. Relative to the prior literature, our atlas will provide improved K-corrections, photometric redshifts and star-formation rate calibrations.
    The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series 12/2013; 212(2). · 16.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We examine the hypothesis that mergers and close encounters between galaxies can fuel active galactic nuclei (AGNs) by increasing the rate at which gas accretes toward the central black hole. We compare the clustering of galaxies around radio-loud AGNs with the clustering around a population of radio-quiet galaxies with similar masses, colors, and luminosities. Our catalog contains 2178 elliptical radio galaxies with flux densities greater than 2.8 mJy at 1.4 GHz from the Six Degree Field Galaxy Survey. We find tentative evidence that radio AGNs with more than 200 times the median radio power have, on average, more close (r < 160 kpc) companions than their radio-quiet counterparts, suggesting that mergers play a role in forming the most powerful radio galaxies. For ellipticals of fixed stellar mass, the radio power is neither a function of large-scale environment nor halo mass, consistent with the radio powers of ellipticals varying by orders of magnitude over billions of years.
    The Astrophysical Journal 07/2013; 772(1):64. · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We examine the hypothesis that mergers and close encounters between galaxies can fuel AGNs by increasing the rate at which gas accretes towards the central black hole. We compare the clustering of galaxies around radio-loud AGNs with the clustering around a population of radio-quiet galaxies with similar masses, colors and luminosities. Our catalog contains 2178 elliptical radio galaxies with flux densities greater than 2.8 mJy at 1.4 GHz from the 6dFGS survey. We find that radio AGNs with more than 200 times the median radio power have, on average, more close (r<160 kpc) companions than their radio-quiet counterparts, suggestive that mergers play a role in forming the most powerful radio galaxies. For ellipticals of fixed stellar mass, the radio power is not a function of large-scale environment nor halo mass, consistent with the radio powers of ellipticals varying by orders of magnitude over billions of years.
    05/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: We measure the clustering of Extremely Red Objects (EROs) in ~8 deg^2 of the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey Bo\"otes field in order to establish robust links between ERO z~1.2 and local galaxy z<0.1 populations. Three different color selection criteria from the literature are analyzed to assess the consequences of using different criteria for selecting EROs. Specifically, our samples are (R-K_s)>5.0 (28,724 galaxies), (I-K_s)>4.0 (22,451 galaxies) and (I-[3.6])>5.0 (64,370 galaxies). Magnitude-limited samples show the correlation length (r_0) to increase for more luminous EROs, implying a correlation with stellar mass. We can separate star-forming and passive ERO populations using the (K_s-[24]) and ([3.6]-[24]) colors to K_s=18.4 and [3.6]=17.5, respectively. Star-forming and passive EROs in magnitude limited samples have different clustering properties and host dark halo masses, and cannot be simply understood as a single population. Based on the clustering, we find that bright passive EROs are the likely progenitors of >4L^* elliptical galaxies. Bright EROs with ongoing star formation were found to occupy denser environments than star-forming galaxies in the local Universe, making these the likely progenitors of >L^* local ellipticals. This suggests that the progenitors of massive >4L^* local ellipticals had stopped forming stars by z>1.2, but that the progenitors of less massive ellipticals (down to L^*) can still show significant star formation at this epoch.
    The Astrophysical Journal 11/2012; 764(1). · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report the Herschel/SPIRE detection of dust emission arising from UV-luminous (L {approx}> L*) star-forming galaxies at 3.3 {approx}< z {approx}< 4.3. Our sample of 1913 Lyman break galaxy (LBG) candidates is selected over an area of 5.3 deg{sup 2} in the Booetes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. This is one of the largest samples of UV-luminous galaxies at this epoch and enables an investigation of the bright end of the galaxy luminosity function. We divide our sample into three luminosity bins and stack the Herschel/SPIRE data to measure the average spectral energy distribution (SED) of LBGs at far-infrared (FIR) wavelengths. We find that these galaxies have average IR luminosities of (3-5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun} and 60%-70% of their star formation obscured by dust. The FIR SEDs peak at {lambda}{sub rest} {approx}> 100 {mu}m suggesting dust temperatures (T{sub d} = 27-30 K) significantly colder than that of local galaxies of comparable IR luminosities. The observed IR-to-UV luminosity ratio (IRX {identical_to} L{sub IR}/L{sub UV}) is low ( Almost-Equal-To 3-4) compared with that observed for z Almost-Equal-To 2 LBGs (IRX{sub z{approx}2} Almost-Equal-To 7.1 {+-} 1.1). The correlation between the slope of the UV continuum and IRX for galaxies in the two lower luminosity bins suggests dust properties similar to those of local starburst galaxies. However, the galaxies in the highest luminosity bin appear to deviate from the local relation, suggesting that their dust properties may differ from those of their lower-luminosity and low-redshift counterparts. We speculate that the most UV-luminous galaxies at this epoch are being observed in a short-lived and young evolutionary phase.
    The Astrophysical Journal Letters 10/2012; 758(2). · 6.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Stern et al.(2012) presented a study of WISE selection of AGN in the 2 deg^2 COSMOS field, finding that a simple criterion W1-W2>=0.8 provides a highly reliable and complete AGN sample for W2<15.05, where the W1 and W2 passbands are centered at 3.4 and 4.6 microns, respectively. Here we extend this study using the larger 9 deg^2 NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey Bootes field which also has considerably deeper WISE observations than the COSMOS field, and find that this simple color-cut significantly loses reliability at fainter fluxes. We define a modified selection criterion combining the W1-W2 color and the W2 magnitude to provide highly reliable or highly complete AGN samples for fainter WISE sources. In particular, we define a color-magnitude cut that finds 130+/-4 deg^-2 AGN candidates for W2<17.11 with 90% reliability. Using the extensive UV through mid-IR broad-band photometry available in this field, we study the spectral energy distributions of WISE AGN candidates. As expected, the WISE AGN selection is biased towards objects where the AGN dominates the bolometric luminosity output, and that it can identify highly obscured AGN. We study the distribution of reddening in the AGN sample and discuss a formalism to account for sample incompleteness based on the step-wise maximum-likelihood method of Efstathiou et al.(1988). The resulting dust obscuration distributions depend strongly on AGN luminosity, consistent with the trend expected for a Simpson (2005) receding torus. At L_AGN~3x10^44 erg/s, 29+/-7% of AGN are observed as Type 1, while at ~4x10^45 erg/s the fraction is 64+/-13%. The distribution of obscuration values suggests that dust in the torus is present as both a diffuse medium and in optically thick clouds.
    The Astrophysical Journal 09/2012; 772(1). · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Using deep B band imaging down to mu_{B} = 26 mag arcsec^{-2}, we present evidence for tidal tails in the Antlia Dwarf galaxy, one of the most distant members of the Local Group. This elongation is in the direction of Antlia's nearest neighbor, the Magellanic-type NGC 3109. The tail is offset by less than 10 degrees from a vector linking the centers of the two galaxies, indicative of interactions between the pair. Combined with the warped disc previously identified in NGC 3109, Antlia and NGC 3109 must be at a small separation for tidal features to be present in Antlia. We calculate that Antlia cannot be completely disrupted by NGC 3109 in a single interaction unless its orbit pericenter is less than 6 kpc, however multiple interactions could significantly alter its morphology. Therefore despite being located right at the edge of the Local Group, environmental effects are playing an important role in Antlia's evolution.
    The Astrophysical Journal Letters 09/2012; 758(2). · 6.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present deep HST/WFPC2, rest-frame U images of 17 ~L* quasars at z=1 and z=2 (V and I bands respectively), designed to explore the host galaxies. We fit the images with simple axisymmetric galaxy models, including a point-source, in order to separate nuclear and host-galaxy emission. We successfully model all of the host galaxies, with luminosities stable to within 0.3 mag. Combining with our earlier NICMOS rest-frame optical study of the same sample, we provide the first rest-frame U-V colours for a sample of quasar host galaxies. While the optical luminosities of their host galaxies indicate that they are drawn purely from the most massive (>~L*) early-type galaxy population, their colours are systematically bluer than those of comparably massive galaxies at the same redshift. The host galaxies of the radio-loud quasars (RLQ) in our sample are more luminous than their radio-quiet quasar (RQQ) counterparts at each epoch, but have indistinguishable colours, confirming that the RLQ's are drawn from only the most massive galaxies (10^{11}-10^{12} M_sun, even at z~2), while the RQQ's are slightly less massive (~10^{11} M_sun). This is consistent with the well-known anticorrelation between radio-loudness and accretion rate. Using simple stellar population "frosting" models we estimate mean star formation rates of ~350 M_sun/yr for the RLQ's and ~100 M_sun/yr for the RQQ's at z~2. By z~1, these rates have fallen to ~150 M_sun/yr for the RLQ's and ~50 M_sun/yr for the RQQ's. We conclude that while the host galaxies are extremely massive, they remain actively star-forming at, or close to, the epoch of the quasar.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 08/2012; 429(1). · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Templates and models of galaxy spectra are often essential for determining the physical properties of galaxies. Many commonly used templates have large systematic errors, which significantly impact photometric redshifts and k-corrections. We present a new library of 110 galaxy template spectra spanning from the ultraviolet to the mid-infrared. The templates combine optical, Spitzer and Akari spectra with MAGPHYS models, all normalised and verified with matched aperture photometry. Our library contains more galaxies, spans a broader range of colours and has smaller systematic errors than previous libraries of galaxy spectra.
    Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union 08/2012; 8(S295).
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    ABSTRACT: We present results for the assembly and star formation histories of massive (~L*) red sequence galaxies in 11 spectroscopically confirmed, infrared-selected galaxy clusters at 1.0 < z < 1.5, the precursors to present-day massive clusters with M ~ 10^15 M_sun. Using rest-frame optical photometry, we investigate evolution in the color and scatter of the red sequence galaxy population, comparing with models of possible star formation histories. In contrast to studies of central cluster galaxies at lower redshift (z < 1), these data are clearly inconsistent with the continued evolution of stars formed and assembled primarily at a single, much-earlier time. Specifically, we find that the colors of massive cluster galaxies at z = 1.5 imply that the bulk of star formation occurred at z ~ 3, whereas by z = 1 their colors imply formation at z ~ 2; therefore these galaxies exhibit approximately the same luminosity-weighted stellar age at 1 < z < 1.5. This likely reflects star formation that occurs over an extended period, the effects of significant progenitor bias, or both. Our results generally indicate that massive cluster galaxy populations began forming a significant mass of stars at z >~ 4, contained some red spheroids by z ~ 1.5, and were actively assembling much of their final mass during 1 < z < 2 in the form of younger stars. Qualitatively, the slopes of the cluster color-magnitude relations are consistent with no significant evolution relative to local clusters.
    The Astrophysical Journal 07/2012; 756(2). · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present the galaxy optical luminosity function for the redshift range 0.05 < z < 0.75 from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey, a spectroscopic survey of 7.6 deg2 in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. Our statistical sample is composed of 12,473 galaxies with known redshifts down to I = 20.4 (AB). Our results at low redshift are consistent with those from Sloan Digital Sky Survey; at higher redshift, we find strong evidence for evolution in the luminosity function, including differential evolution between blue and red galaxies. We find that the luminosity density evolves as (1 + z)(0.54 ± 0.64) for red galaxies and (1 + z)(1.64 ± 0.39) for blue galaxies.
    The Astrophysical Journal 02/2012; 748(1):10. · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present the galaxy optical luminosity function for the redshift range 0.05<z<0.75 from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES), a spectroscopic survey of 7.6 sq. deg. in the Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. Our statistical sample is comprised of 12,473 galaxies with known redshifts down to I=20.4 (AB). Our results at low redshift are consistent with those from SDSS; at higher redshift, we find strong evidence for evolution in the luminosity function, including differential evolution between blue and red galaxies. We find that the luminosity density evolves as (1+z)^(0.54+/-0.64) for red galaxies and (1+z)^(1.64+/-0.39) for blue galaxies.
    01/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes the first catalogue of photometrically-derived stellar mass estimates for intermediate-redshift (z < 0.65) galaxies in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) spectroscopic redshift survey. These masses, as well as the full set of ancillary stellar population parameters, will be made public as part of GAMA data release 2. Although the GAMA database does include NIR photometry, we show that the quality of our stellar population synthesis fits is significantly poorer when these NIR data are included. Further, for a large fraction of galaxies, the stellar population parameters inferred from the optical-plus-NIR photometry are formally inconsistent with those inferred from the optical data alone. This may indicate problems in our stellar population library, or NIR data issues, or both; these issues will be addressed for future versions of the catalogue. For now, we have chosen to base our stellar mass estimates on optical photometry only. In light of our decision to ignore the available NIR data, we examine how well stellar mass can be constrained based on optical data alone. We use generic properties of stellar population synthesis models to demonstrate that restframe colour alone is in principle a very good estimator of stellar mass-to-light ratio, M*/Li. Further, we use the observed relation between restframe (g-i) and M*/Li for real GAMA galaxies to argue that, modulo uncertainties in the stellar evolution models themselves, (g-i) colour can in practice be used to estimate M*/Li to an accuracy of < ~0.1 dex. This 'empirically calibrated' (g-i)-M*/Li relation offers a simple and transparent means for estimating galaxies' stellar masses based on minimal data, and so provides a solid basis for other surveys to compare their results to z < ~0.4 measurements from GAMA.
    Monthly Notices of The Royal Astronomical Society - MON NOTIC ROY ASTRON SOC. 08/2011; 418.
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    ABSTRACT: We investigate the average physical properties and star formation histories (SFHs) of the most UV-luminous star-forming galaxies at z ~ 3.7. Our results are based on the average spectral energy distributions (SEDs), constructed from stacked optical-to-infrared photometry, of a sample of the 1913 most UV-luminous star-forming galaxies found in 5.3 deg2 of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. We find that the shape of the average SED in the rest optical and infrared is fairly constant with UV luminosity, i.e., more UV-luminous galaxies are, on average, also more luminous at longer wavelengths. In the rest UV, however, the spectral slope β (≡ dlogF λ/dlogλ; measured at 0.13 μm < λrest < 0.28 μm) rises steeply with the median UV luminosity from –1.8 at L L* to –1.2 (L 4-5L*). We use population synthesis analyses to derive their average physical properties and find that (1) L UV and thus star formation rates (SFRs) scale closely with stellar mass such that more UV-luminous galaxies are also more massive, (2) the median ages indicate that the stellar populations are relatively young (200-400 Myr) and show little correlation with UV luminosity, and (3) more UV-luminous galaxies are dustier than their less-luminous counterparts, such that L 4-5L* galaxies are extincted up to A(1600) = 2 mag while L L* galaxies have A(1600) = 0.7-1.5 mag. We argue that the average SFHs of UV-luminous galaxies are better described by models in which SFR increases with time in order to simultaneously reproduce the tight correlation between the UV-derived SFR and stellar mass and their universally young ages. We demonstrate the potential of measurements of the SFR-M * relation at multiple redshifts to discriminate between simple models of SFHs. Finally, we discuss the fate of these UV-brightest galaxies in the next 1-2 Gyr and their possible connection to the most massive galaxies at z ~ 2.
    The Astrophysical Journal 05/2011; 733(2):99. · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present the first measurement of the spatial clustering of mid-infrared-selected obscured and unobscured quasars, using a sample in the redshift range 0.7 < z < 1.8 selected from the 9 deg2 Boötes multiwavelength survey. Recently, the Spitzer Space Telescope and X-ray observations have revealed large populations of obscured quasars that have been inferred from models of the X-ray background and supermassive black hole evolution. To date, little is known about obscured quasar clustering, which allows us to measure the masses of their host dark matter halos and explore their role in the cosmic evolution of black holes and galaxies. In this study, we use a sample of 806 mid-infrared-selected quasars and 250,000 galaxies to calculate the projected quasar-galaxy cross-correlation function wp (R). The observed clustering yields characteristic dark matter halo masses of log(M halo [h –1 M ☉]) = 12.7+0.4 –0.6 and 13.3+0.3 –0.4 for unobscured quasars (QSO-1s) and obscured quasars (Obs-QSOs), respectively. The results for QSO-1s are in excellent agreement with previous measurements for optically selected quasars, while we conclude that the Obs-QSOs are at least as strongly clustered as the QSO-1s. We test for the effects of photometric redshift errors on the optically faint Obs-QSOs, and find that our method yields a robust lower limit on the clustering; photo-z errors may cause us to underestimate the clustering amplitude of the Obs-QSOs by at most ~20%. We compare our results to previous studies, and speculate on physical implications of stronger clustering for obscured quasars.
    The Astrophysical Journal 03/2011; 731(2):117. · 6.73 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
345.51 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2008–2014
    • Monash University (Australia)
      • Monash Centre for Astrophysics
      Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • 2012
    • University of Leicester
      • Department of Physics and Astronomy
      Leiscester, England, United Kingdom
  • 2004–2012
    • Princeton University
      • Department of Astrophysical Sciences
      Princeton, New Jersey, United States
  • 2010
    • Monash University (Malaysia)
      Labuan, Labuan, Malaysia
  • 2005–2008
    • National Optical Astronomy Observatory
      Tucson, Arizona, United States
  • 1998–2007
    • University of Melbourne
      • School of Physics
      Melbourne, Victoria, Australia