Eun-Mi Eom

Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Seoul, South Korea

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Publications (5)10.33 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The Rho family, a group of small GTP-binding proteins, consists of Rho, Rac and Cdc42 subfamilies in animals and yeasts, and modulates many cellular processes related to the actin cytoskeleton. According to recent study, ROP, a Rho subfamily, is a distinct subgroup found in plant, where it is also involved in the regulation of the cytoskeleton, especially in growth of the tip of the pollen tube. In this study, a rho-related gene was isolated from a mung bean cDNA library and characterized. This gene contains five conserved regions (G1–G5) including the effector-binding domain of many small GTP-binding proteins, and CAAL motif at the C-terminus, suggesting that it might be localized in the membrane. Based on overall homology in its effector-binding domain to those of the Rho family, and to those of plant ROPs, this gene was named VrRop1. The phylogenetic analysis also confirmed that it is related to the Rho families of various species. The VrROP1 protein appears be a member of a subgroup of the ROP family, which includes AtROP1, OsROP5, AtROP7, AtROP3, AtROP4 based on phylogenetic relationship and differential distribution in tissues, especially preferable expression in roots. The transcript of VrRop1 is about 1000 nt long and this gene is likely to exist as a multigene family. Purified recombinant VrROP1 protein can bind to the guanosine nucleotide and has an intrinsic GTP hydrolysis activity, confirming the VrROP1 protein as a typical small GTP-binding protein. However, VrRop1 did not complement rho3 and cdc42 in yeasts. Although the other yeast RHO genes need to be tested, it is likely that VrRop1 might have unique signaling pathways in plants, different from those in yeasts, including controlling actin cytoskeleton.
    Plant Science. 01/2006;
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    ABSTRACT: Recent introduction of a learning algorithm for cDNA microarray analysis has permitted to select feature set to accurately distinguish human cancers according to their pathological judgments. Here, we demonstrate that hepatitis B virus-positive hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) could successfully be identified from non-tumor liver tissues by supervised learning analysis of gene expression profiling. Through learning and cross-validating HCC sample set, we could identify an optimized set of 44 genes to discriminate the status of HCC from non-tumor liver tissues. In an analysis of other blind-tested HCC sample sets, this feature set was found to be statistically significant, indicating the reproducibility of our molecular discrimination approach with the defined genes. One prominent finding was an asymmetrical distribution pattern of expression profiling in HCC, in which the number of down-regulated genes was greater than that of up-regulated genes. In conclusion, the present findings indicate that application of learning algorithm to HCC may establish a reliable feature set of genes to be useful for therapeutic target of HCC, and that the asymmetric expression pattern may emphasize the importance of suppressed genes in HCC.
    Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 01/2005; 1739(1):50-61. · 4.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In an attempt to understand the molecular bases of gastric cancer progression, we have analyzed the differentially expressed genes in gastric cancer by SAGE. Four SAGE cDNA tag libraries were constructed from two sets of gastric cancer and normal tissues and 241,127 tags were obtained. By comparing the tags from cancer and normal tissues, 414 differentially expressed tags, representing 383 genes, were identified in cancer tissues (p </= 0.01). Of the 414 tags, 50 tags were previously unidentified and potentially novel genes. Although each gastric cancer tissue revealed more than 200 differentially expressed genes compared to the respective normal tissue, the number of genes with consistent regulation patterns in both cancer tissues was 51: 12 up-regulated and 39 down-regulated genes. The genes that showed consistent regulation patterns included well-known genes such as Trefoil factor 3, RegIV, gastric intrinsic factor, and lactotransferrin as well as a few novel candidates. Interestingly, the expression of several genes, such as osteoglycin, prostate stem cell antigen, and histone deacetylase 3, was variable in the two normal tissues but similar in the cancer tissues. The expression profiles of these genes in normal tissues, possibly due to genetic background, could greatly affect individual sensitivity to cancer development and/or progression. The genes identified in this study will provide useful target genes for diagnosis and molecular treatment of gastric cancer.
    Genomics 07/2003; 82(1):78-85. · 3.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: For molecular and cytogenetic studies, two partial bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries of the garlic cultivar Allium sativum L. 'Danyang' were constructed using high molecular weight (HMW) garlic DNA, the pBAC1-SACB1 vector, and the pIndigoBAC536 vector. The average insert size of the BAC library was about 90 kb. The sequence compositions of the BAC clones were characterized by Southern hybridization with garlic genomic DNA and a repetitive sequence clone of garlic. Two BAC clones with weak signals (thus implying mostly unique sequences), GBC2-5e and GBC2-4d, were selected for FISH analysis. FISH analysis localized the GBC2-5e (approximately 100 kb) BAC clone on the long arm of garlic chromosome 7. The other BAC clone, GBC2-4d (approximately 110 kb), gave rise to discrete FISH signals on a mid-size early metaphase chromosome. The FISH screening with BAC clones proved to be a useful resource for molecular cytogenetic studies of garlic, and will be useful for further mapping and sequencing studies of important genes of this plant.
    Genome 07/2003; 46(3):514-20. · 1.67 Impact Factor
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    Eun-Mi Eom, Dong-Hee Lee
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    ABSTRACT: The genetic background of the garlic (Allium sativum L.) is not well understood, since it is cultivated exclusively by vegetative propagation. To understand its genetic background, a local cultivar, Danyang, was chosen, and several basic characteristics of its chromosomal DNA were examined. Its G + C content was 40.6%, and the relative proportion of fast reassociated sequences, intermediate reassociated sequences, and slow reassociated sequences were 12%, 40%, and 48%, respectively. The genome size, calculated based on reassociation kinetic experiments, was 1.11 x 1010 bp or 12.16 pg per haploid genome. To compare the genetic variation among four local cultivars, Munkyung, Seosan, Euiseong, and Danyang, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was performed. By using slightly longer primers, 18–24 nucleotides in size, than the traditional primers used for such analysis, more reliable RAPD results were obtained. 15 primers gave rise to amplified bands, and the results could be grouped into two categories. The patterns of amplified products produced by 12 primers, group A, were polymorphic. These results were analyzed using a NTSYS-PC (Numerical Taxonomy and Multivariate Analysis System), and a dendrogram grouping the four local cultivars was produced. The three primers of group B gave rise to a monomorphic band pattern from four local garlic clutivars, indicating that these primers possibly recognize garlic specific sequences. These primers were useful in identifying genetic variations among theAllium species.
    Journal of Plant Biology 06/1999; 42(2):159-167. · 0.99 Impact Factor