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Publications (9)9.41 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Mediastinal lymph node carcinoma of unknown primary site is rare and may have a better prognosis if extensive treatment is performed. Case, A 69-year-old-male presented with a persistent cough. Chest computed tomography (CT) demonstrated a large tumor 9.5 × 8.2 cm, in the mediastinum, compressing the right main bronchus, the right pulmonary artery, and the superior vena cava. Because fiberoptic bronchoscopy was insufficient for diagnosis, mediastinoscopic tumor biopsy under general anesthesia was undertaken. Histological examination revealed adenocarcinoma. Extensive examinations revealed no other neoplastic lesion except in the mediastinum. Mediastinal lymph node carcinoma of unknown primary site was diagnosed. The patient was treated with docetaxel and cisplatin with concurrent thoracic radiation therapy. A month after the start of chemoradiotherapy, the mediastinal tumor regressed markedly. The patient remained free of symptoms without regrowth of the primary site. Exploration of the body showed no further abnormalities 20 months after disease onset.
    Acta medica Okayama 12/2011; 65(6):407-11. · 0.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report the case of a 92-year-old man with a 13-year history of occupational asbestos exposure who presented with a complaint of dyspnea. In September 2001, bilateral pleural effusions were revealed on chest radiography, and continued to progress despite treatment for heart failure. Chest CT revealed calcification of the pleura but no abnormal findings in the lung fields. Both pleural effusions were exudative and lymphocytes were the predominant cells contained in them. Antituberculous chemotherapy had no effect on the exudates. In March 2002, thoracoscopy was performed under local anesthesia (medical thoracoscopy). Plaque was recognized on the parietal pleura; however, the serosal surfaces of the parietal and visceral pleura were smooth, and no evidence of malignancy, especially malignant mesothelioma, was noted. The patient's condition was diagnosed as benign asbestos pleural effusions. Prednisolone was administered, and these effusions gradually decreased. Cases of benign asbestos pleural effusion occurring simultaneously with massive bilateral effusions are rare. Thoracoscopy aided in the differential diagnosis of this case.
    Nihon Kokyūki Gakkai zasshi = the journal of the Japanese Respiratory Society. 07/2003; 41(6):382-5.
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    ABSTRACT: A few reports have suggested the possible association between lung cancer and bullous disease. We report a surgical case of lung adenocarcinoma located in close proximity to pulmonary bullae. A 48-year-old nonsmoker, asymptomatic male was found to have a pulmonary tumor mass and giant bulla in the right lung. Thoracotomy identified a tumor arising from a firm, scarred and contracted area close to the bulla wall. Based on this report and review of other cases in the literature, we emphasize the need for physicians to be aware of the potential development of lung cancer in patients with pulmonary bulla.
    Respiration 01/1999; 66(6):555-558. · 2.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A rare case of benign asbestos pleural effusion associated with aspergilloma is reported. A chest radiograph of a 75-year-old Japanese man who was admitted with right chest pain showed a right pleural effusion and nodular shadows in the right apex and left middle lung field. Thoracocentesis revealed an exudate with atypical mesothelial cells. An open lung biopsy showed aspergilloma in the right S2 area and no evidence of malignancy. Many reactive mesothelial cells were found in the pleura. A quantitative asbestos digestion study of the lung tissue biopsy showed high-grade asbestos exposure.
    Internal Medicine 12/1998; 37(11):965-8. · 0.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report two cases of diffuse malignant pleural mesothelioma occurring almost simultaneously in one family. Patient 1 was a 42-year-old Japanese man who had worked as an electrical engineer for 25 years. Patient 2, his mother, was 69 years old. She lived for 10 years with patient 1 after he started his work, and also worked at a shipyard herself for 6 years. The concentrations of cytokeratin subunit 19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1) in pleural fluid of the two patients were 1,500 ng/ml, and 1,200 ng/ml, respectively. Measurement of CYFRA 21-1 concentration in the pleural fluid may be a useful tool for a diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma.
    Internal Medicine 05/1998; 37(4):407-10. · 0.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A case with benign cystic teratoma growing in the thoracic cavity, which is rare in Japan, in a 49-year-old woman is reported. She complained a chest pain suddenly. Chest X-ray examination revealed an abnormal shadow and pleural effusion in the right lung field. Chest CT scan and MRI disclosed a capsulated tumor in the thoracic cavity. During surgery the tumor had adhered to the part of the parietal pleura with no continuity with anterior mediastinum. The tumor measured 11.0 x 9.5 cm in size and was a mature cystic teratoma with pancreatic tissue, histologically. The fluid levels of amylase extracted from the tumor was highly elevated. Rupture due to autodigestion by pancreatic amylase of the tumor was supposed to be a cause of chest pain.
    Kyobu geka. The Japanese journal of thoracic surgery 05/1996; 49(4):341-3.
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    ABSTRACT: Congenital tracheoesophageal fistula without atresia can persist and remain undetected without symptoms until adulthood. We have recently encountered such a rare case and also conducted a review of the literature. Symptoms are commonly present during infancy, but occasionally patients do not develop symptoms until adulthood. In this case, it is suggested that the symptoms commenced after the redundant mucosal flap or membrane was broken due to a trauma to the chest.
    Surgery Today 02/1996; 26(9):744-6. · 0.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A case with chondrosarcoma of rib, which is relatively uncommon in Japan, in a 61-year-old man is reported. Chest X-ray examination revealed an abnormal shadow in the right of the chest wall. Chest CT scan and MRI disclosed the tumor to have been arosen from the right 5th rib protruding into the thoracic cavity. Surgical resections of the tumor with parts of the 4th and 5th ribs and parietal pleura were performed. The defect of the chest wall was repaired with muscle. The tumor measured 3.0 x 3.0 x 3.5 cm in size and was a chondrosarcoma of the low grade malignancy, histologically. Post operative course was uneventful with no adjuvant therapy.
    Kyobu geka. The Japanese journal of thoracic surgery 01/1996; 48(13):1141-3.
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    ABSTRACT: A few reports have suggested the possible association between lung cancer and bullous disease. We report a surgical case of lung adenocarcinoma located in close proximity to pulmonary bullae. A 48-year-old nonsmoker, asymptomatic male was found to have a pulmonary tumor mass and giant bulla in the right lung. Thoracotomy identified a tumor arising from a firm, scarred and contracted area close to the bulla wall. Based on this report and review of other cases in the literature, we emphasize the need for physicians to be aware of the potential development of lung cancer in patients with pulmonary bulla.
    Respiration 66(6):555-8. · 2.92 Impact Factor