Lawrence Locker

Georgia Southern University, Georgia, United States

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Publications (6)9.82 Total impact

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    Lawrence Locker, Lesa Hoffman, James A Bovaird
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    ABSTRACT: The use of multilevel modeling is presented as an alternative to separate item and subject ANOVAs (F1 x F2) in psycholinguistic research. Multilevel modeling is commonly utilized to model variability arising from the nesting of lower level observations within higher level units (e.g., students within schools, repeated measures within individuals). However, multilevel models can also be used when two random factors are crossed at the same level, rather than nested. The current work illustrates the use of the multilevel model for crossed random effects within the context of a psycholinguistic experimental study, in which both subjects and items are modeled as random effects within the same analysis, thus avoiding some of the problems plaguing current approaches.
    Behavior Research Methods 12/2007; 39(4):723-30. · 2.12 Impact Factor
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    Mark Yates, Lawrence Locker, Greg B Simpson
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    ABSTRACT: In the research reported here, we investigated the influence of phonological neighborhood density on the processing of words in the visual lexical decision task. The results of the first experiment revealed that words with large phonological neighborhoods were verified more rapidly than words with small phonological neighborhoods. In the second experiment, we replicated this effect with a more tightly controlled set of stimuli. These results demonstrate the importance of phonological codes when processing visually presented letter strings. We relate this research to previous results on semantic and orthographic neighborhoods and discuss the results within the context of a model in which lexical decisions are based on stimulus familiarity.
    Psychonomic Bulletin & Review 07/2004; 11(3):452-7. · 2.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Within the dual-route framework it is hypothesised that readers exhibit flexibility in their use of lexical and non-lexical information in word naming. In the present study, participants named high- and low-frequency regular one-syllable English words embedded within lists of regular or irregular one- or two-syllable English words. A large number of irregular words should bias the reader toward the lexical route, whereas a list consisting exclusively of regular words should allow more efficient use of sublexical information present in the word. Word frequency effects were obtained when the list was dominated by either regular or irregular two-syllable filler words. Furthermore, there was an interaction between frequency and regularity for the one-syllable words, indicating that the frequency effect was significantly larger when the fillers were one-syllable irregular words relative to one-syllable regular words. These results extend those reported for a shallow orthography, and indicate strategic control over the use of phonological and lexical information in English word recognition.
    Journal of Research in Reading 10/2003; 26(3):280 - 286. · 1.25 Impact Factor
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    Mark Yates, Lawrence Locker, Greg B Simpson
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    ABSTRACT: In two experiments, we investigated the relationship between semantics and phonology in the lexical decision task. In the first experiment, lexical decisions to words with large semantic neighborhoods were faster than those to words with sparse semantic neighborhoods. Conversely, this effect of semantic neighborhood was reversed for pseudohomophones (e.g., nale). That is, pseudohomophones based on words with large semantic neighborhoods took longer to reject than did those based on words with sparse semantic neighborhoods. In the second experiment, we found the magnitude of the semantic neighborhood effect for words to be a function of nonword foil type. Taken together, these results indicate that semantic neighborhood size affects processing of both words and pseudohomophones, and that the effect of semantic neighborhood size for words is more pronounced when pseudohomophone foils are employed. These effects are discussed in terms of a model in which the orthographic, phonological, and semantic systems are fully interactive.
    Memory & Cognition 10/2003; 31(6):856-66. · 1.92 Impact Factor
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    Lawrence Locker, Greg B Simpson, Mark Yates
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    ABSTRACT: The effect of semantic neighborhood on the processing of ambiguous words was examined in two lexical decision experiments. Semantic neighborhood was defined in terms of semantic set size and network connectivity. In Experiment 1, the variables of semantic set size, network connectivity, and ambiguity were crossed. An ambiguity advantage was observed only within small-set low-connectivity words. In Experiment 2, the effect of network connectivity on the processing of words of high and low meaning relatedness was examined. Participants responded more rapidly to words of high meaning relatedness, relative to words of low meaning relatedness, but only within high-connectivity words. These results are interpreted within a framework in which both semantic feedback processes and meaning-level competition can affect the recognition of semantically ambiguous words.
    Memory & Cognition 07/2003; 31(4):505-15. · 1.92 Impact Factor
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    Lawrence Locker