Christoph P Wiedenmayer

New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York City, New York, United States

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Publications (22)91.61 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To survive, all mammalian species must recognize and respond appropriately to threatening stimuli. In adults, the prelimbic medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) appears to be involved in fear expression whereas the infralimbic mPFC mediates fear extinction. In juvenile rats (PN26), the mPFC receives information on potential predators but does not act on it. To test whether the prefrontal cortex is capable of fear regulation in the young organism, we exposed juvenile rats to a threatening or nonthreatening stimulus and assessed fear and brain Fos activation of the mPFC subdivisions, amygdala, and periaqueductal gray (PAG). In response to the threat, juveniles froze more, spent more time far from the threat, and had elevated numbers of Fos-positive cells in the prelimbic mPFC, the medial amygdala, and ventral PAG. To test the hypothesis that the mPFC has a dual role in modulating the amygdala and PAG in juveniles, we pharmacologically disinhibited each of the two subdivisions of the mPFC and assessed freezing and downstream activation to the threat. Juvenile rats infused with picrotoxin into the prelimbic mPFC and exposed to a threatening stimulus froze less, spent less time far from the threat, and increased Fos expression. Infusion of picrotoxin into the infralimbic mPFC also reduced fear responding to the threatening stimulus but had no effect on Fos expression. In sum, it appears that the mPFC can process threatening stimuli in juveniles at this age, even though it is normally not involved in the fear responses.Neuropsychopharmacology accepted article preview online, 19 February 2014; doi:10.1038/npp.2014.40.
    Neuropsychopharmacology: official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology 02/2014; · 8.68 Impact Factor
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    Patricia A Kabitzke, Lindsay Silva, Christoph Wiedenmayer
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    ABSTRACT: Predator odors induce unconditioned fear in the young animal and provide the opportunity to study the mechanisms underlying unlearned and learned fear. In the current study, cat odor produced unlearned, innate fear in infant (postnatal age 14; PN14) and juvenile (PN26) rats, but contextual fear learning occurred only in juveniles. It was hypothesized that contextual fear learning in juveniles is mediated by norepinephrine. Consistent with this hypothesis, pre-training injection of the β-adrenergic antagonist propranolol reduced the unlearned fear response while post-training injection inhibited contextual fear learning in juvenile rats exposed to cat odor. We suggest that NE mediates the formation of contextual fear memories by activation of the transcription factor CREB in the hippocampus in juveniles but not in infants. Levels of phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) were increased in the dorsal and ventral hippocampi of juvenile rats exposed to cat odor. These levels were not increased in infants or juveniles exposed to a control odor. Further, propranolol blocked these increases in pCREB. In conclusion, although innate fear occurs within the neonatal period, contextual fear learning is a relatively late-occurring event, is hippocampal dependent, and mediated by norepinephrine.
    Neurobiology of Learning and Memory 04/2011; 96(2):166-72. · 3.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In adult animals, the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) plays a significant role in regulating emotions and projects to the amygdala and periaqueductal gray (PAG) to modulate emotional responses. However, little is known about the development of this neural circuit and its relevance to unlearned fear in pre-adulthood. To address these issues, we examined the mPFC of 14-d-old (infants), 26-d-old (juveniles), and 38- to 42-d-old (adolescents) rats to represent different developmental and social milestones. The expression patterns of the neuronal marker FOS were used to assess neurological activity. Muscimol, a GABA agonist, was used to inactivate the prelimbic and infralimbic mPFC subdivisions (400 ng in 200 nl). Animals were exposed to either a threatening or nonthreatening stimulus that was ecologically relevant and age specific. Freezing was measured as an indicator of innate fear behavior. The data indicated that the mPFC is neither active nor responsive to innate fear in infant rats. In juveniles, the prelimbic mPFC became responsive in processing aversive sensory stimulation but did not regulate freezing behavior. Finally, during adolescence, inactivation of the prelimbic mPFC significantly attenuated freezing and decreased FOS expression in the ventral PAG. Surprisingly, across all ages, there were no significant differences in FOS levels in the medial and basolateral/lateral amygdala when either mPFC subdivision was inactivated. Together, unlearned fear has a unique developmental course with different brain areas involved in unlearned fear in the immature animal than the adult. In particular, the mPFC neural circuitry is different in young animals and progressively develops more capacities as the animal matures.
    Journal of Neuroscience 03/2011; 31(13):4991-9. · 6.91 Impact Factor
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    Patricia A Kabitzke, Christoph P Wiedenmayer
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    ABSTRACT: Predator odors have been found to induce unconditioned fear in adult animals and provide the opportunity to study the mechanisms underlying unlearned and learned fear. Predator threats change across an animal's lifetime, as do abilities that enable the animal to learn or engage in different defensive behaviors. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine the combination of factors that successfully induce unlearned fear to predator odor across development. Infant, juvenile, adolescent, and adult rats were exposed to one of the three odor stimuli (control odor, cat urine, or cat fur) in either a small or large chamber. Though all ages displayed fear-related behavior to cat odors, differences were reflected only in freezing behavior and not, as expected, risk-assessment. Infant and juvenile animals also increased freezing to cat urine compared to the control odor, possibly because these age groups possess limited defensive options to cope with threat and so may respond with freezing to all predator stimuli. Unexpectedly, chamber size had no effect on either freezing or risk-assessment in this study. Once the parameters of unconditioned fear are understood, they can be exploited to develop a learning paradigm to predator odors that could be used in early life.
    Behavioural processes 02/2011; 86(2):257-62. · 1.53 Impact Factor
  • Christoph P. Wiedenmayer
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    ABSTRACT: Animals have the ability to respond to threatening situations with sets of defensive behaviors. This review demonstrates that defensive behaviors change during early life in mammals. First, unlearned responses are reorganized during early ontogeny and expressed in an age-specific way. Second, the expression of defensive responses is influenced by early experience prior to the first encounter with a threat. Third, once animals have been exposed to a threatening stimulus they subsequently modify their behavior. The neural bases of defensive behavior and the processes that alter them during development are discussed. Maturation of components and connections of the fear circuit seem to contribute to changes in unlearned fear responses. Early experience and learning modify these developmental processes and shape the expression of defensive behavior. Continuous reorganization of the neural substrate and defensive behavior during ontogeny seems to allow the animal to adjust to the conditions it encounters at a given age in a given environment. It is proposed that the developmental changes in defensive behavior can be conceptualized as phenotypic plasticity.
    Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews 01/2009; · 10.28 Impact Factor
  • Patricia A Kabitzke, Christoph P Wiedenmayer
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    ABSTRACT: Animal models can be used to explore the causal relationships between aversive events and psychopathologies such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), yet hardly any studies have looked at young animals and different levels of threat using ecologically-relevant fear-inducing stimuli. In this study, we investigated unlearned fear responses and fear learning in rats across development when they are exposed to cues originating from a severe threat – their natural predator. Rats of four different ages, representing major developmental and social milestones (pre-weaning, post-weaned, adolescent, and adult), were exposed to different types of predator cues representing different levels of threat: cat fur, cat urine, or a live cat. The cat odor cues were very effective in inducing unlearned fear responses (i.e. freezing) in all age groups. We then tested the rats for contextual fear memory by returning them to the exposure chamber twenty-four hours later. Rats froze significantly more when they had previously been exposed to the cat odor cues compared to controls. The formation of associative memories of a context in which a fear-inducing stimulus was experienced appears to improve with age in this study. The type of odor cue also appears to be critical. Different odor cues may thus signal different levels of threat at different times during development.
    40th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Developmental Psychobiology, San Diego; 10/2007
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    Patrick Bateson, Myron Hofer, Ronald Oppenheim, Christoph Wiedenmayer
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    ABSTRACT: A multitude of scientific disciplines study the development of behavior. Their use of different methodological and conceptual approaches makes integration of findings difficult. In a symposium at the 38th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Developmental Psychobiology in Washington DC, the question was discussed if a general theory of development could unify the field. The three participants explain their views and discuss the possibility of a theoretical framework for development.
    Developmental Psychobiology 02/2007; 49(1):77-86. · 2.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Research in animal models has demonstrated that elevated levels of glucocorticoids can inflict damage within the hippocampus. In adult humans, elevated cortisol levels have been associated with reduced hippocampal volumes; however, normative data in children are not available. The objective of this study was to examine possible associations of serum cortisol levels with hippocampal volumes and morphology in healthy children. Morning serum cortisol levels and hippocampus magnetic resonance imaging were measured in 17 healthy children (8 girls, 9 boys) between 7 and 12 years of age. Cortisol levels were not associated with total hippocampal volumes; however, with an analysis of surface morphology, significant associations were found for regionally specific portions of the hippocampus. Positive associations were detected for the anterior segment of the hippocampus and inverse associations along the lateral aspects of the hippocampus. Associations of cortisol levels with regionally specific variations in hippocampal morphology were detected during early development in healthy preadolescent children.
    Biological Psychiatry 11/2006; 60(8):856-61. · 9.25 Impact Factor
  • Sean W C Chen, Alexei Shemyakin, Christoph P Wiedenmayer
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    ABSTRACT: Early in ontogeny, young rats must be able to detect dangerous stimuli and to exhibit appropriate defensive behaviors. Different nuclei of the amygdala mediate unconditioned and conditioned fear responses to threat in adult rats. The aim of this study was to determine the role of the amygdala in unlearned fear behavior in young rats. When exposed to an unfamiliar adult male rat, preweaning rat pups freeze, with peak levels on postnatal day 14 and declining levels on day 18. Pups were made anosmic to block olfactory input to the amygdala, and amygdala activation was assessed by quantifying the neuronal marker c-fos. Anosmic pups did not freeze in the presence of the male rat and had decreased c-fos expression in the medial amygdala on day 14 and in the medial and lateral amygdala on day 18. However, the decrease in freezing between days 14 and 18 was not associated with a decrease in c-fos expression in the medial amygdala. The medial and lateral amygdala were then inactivated by local muscimol infusion on day 14. Muscimol infusion into the medial amygdala decreased freezing to the male rat but not to a loud noise, whereas infusion into the lateral amygdala blocked freezing to a loud noise but not to the male. These findings indicate that different nuclei of the amygdala process sensory information of different modalities, mediate unconditioned freezing, and may be involved in developmental changes in the fear response in young rats.
    Journal of Neuroscience 02/2006; 26(1):233-40. · 6.91 Impact Factor
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    Christoph P Wiedenmayer, Ana M Magariños, Bruce S McEwen, Gordon A Barr
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    ABSTRACT: Young animals respond to threatening stimuli in an age-specific way. Their endocrine and behavioral responses reflect the potential threat of the situation at a given age. The aim of the present study was to determine whether corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is involved in the endocrine and behavioral responses to threat and their developmental changes in young rats. Preweaning 14-day-old and postweaning 26-day-old rats were exposed to two age-specific threats, cat odor and an adult male rat. The acute behavioral response was determined during exposure. After exposure, the time courses of the corticosterone response and of CRF expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) and in extrahypothalamic areas were assessed. Preweaning rats became immobile when exposed to cat odor or the male rat, whereas postweaning rats became immobile to cat odor only. Male exposure increased serum corticosterone levels in 14-day-old rats, but cat odor failed to increase levels at either age. Exposure induced elevation of CRF mRNA levels in the PVN that paralleled changes in corticosterone levels. CRF may thus play a role in endocrine regulation and its developmental changes during early life. Neither cat odor nor the adult male altered CRF mRNA levels in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) or the amygdala, but both stimuli increased levels in the hippocampus. Hippocampal CRF mRNA expression levels did not parallel cat odor or male-induced immobility, indicating that CRF is not involved in this response in young rats but may be involved in aspects of learning and memory.
    Hormones and Behavior 03/2005; 47(2):139-50. · 3.74 Impact Factor
  • Christoph P Wiedenmayer
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    ABSTRACT: The experience of a single threatening situation may alter the behavior of an animal in a long-lasting way. Long-lasting changes in behavior have been induced in laboratory animals to model and investigate the development and neural substrate of human psychopathologies. Under natural conditions, however, changes in behavior after an aversive experience may be adaptive because behavioral modifications allow animals to adjust to a threat for extended periods of time. In the laboratory setting, properties of the aversive situation and the potential of the animal to respond to the threat may be altered and lead to extensive, prolonged changes, indicating a failure in behavioral regulation. Such long-term changes seem to be mediated by neuronal alterations in components of the fear pathway. To understand psychopathologies, determinants of exaggerated responsivity and the underlying molecular and neural processes have to be analyzed in a comparative way under conditions that produce normal and abnormal fear and anxiety.
    Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews 04/2004; 28(1):1-12. · 10.28 Impact Factor
  • Christoph P Wiedenmayer, Ana M Magarinos, Bruce S McEwen, Gordon A Barr
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    ABSTRACT: Exposure to a deadly threat, an adult male rat, induced the release of corticosterone in 14-day-old rat pups. The endocrine stress response was decreased when the pups were reunited with their mother immediately after exposure. These findings demonstrate that social variables can reduce the consequences of an aversive experience.
    Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 01/2004; 1008:304-7. · 4.38 Impact Factor
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    C.P. Wiedenmayer, P.A.H. Noailles, J.A. Angulo, G.A. Barr
    Neuroscience 06/2003; 119(2):621. · 3.12 Impact Factor
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    Christoph P Wiedenmayer, Donggon Lyo, Gordon A Barr
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    ABSTRACT: We examined how the experience of a threatening stimulus alters subsequent behavior in a situation where the immediate threat is absent. A small huddle of 12-day-old rats was exposed to a potentially infanticidal adult male rat for 5 min. During male exposure, pups were significantly more immobile than control pups. Thirty, 60, and 180 min after male exposure, the pups were isolated for 5 min from litter and dam in an unfamiliar environment. When isolated, pups that had been previously exposed to the male emitted significantly fewer ultrasonic vocalizations than controls, but did not differ in immobility. Low levels of vocalization were apparent 30 and 60 min after male exposure and were not evident at 180 min. The pups seemed to have adjusted their behavior to a potential male threat in a different context for a limited period of time.
    Developmental Psychobiology 06/2003; 42(4):386-91. · 2.60 Impact Factor
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    C P Wiedenmayer, P A H Noailles, J A Angulo, G A Barr
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    ABSTRACT: Stress activates endogenous opioids that modulate nociceptive transmission. Exposure to a potentially infanticidal adult male rat suppresses pain-related behaviors in pre-weaning but not in older rats. This male-induced analgesia is mediated by l opioid receptors in the periaqueductal gray, a midbrain structure that is innervated by amygdala projections. To determine whether enkephalin, a l and d opioid receptor agonist, is activated by male exposure, mRNA levels of its precursor, preproenkephalin, were measured in subdivisions of the amygdala and the periaqueductal gray. In 14-day-old but not in 21-day-old rats, 5 min of male exposure induced analgesia to heat and increased preproenkephalin mRNA levels in the central nucleus of the amygdala but not in the periaqueductal gray. The change in the activation of enkephalinergic neurons in the central amygdala may contribute to the change in stress-induced analgesia during early ontogeny.
    Neuroscience 02/2002; 114(1):7-11. · 3.12 Impact Factor
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    C P Wiedenmayer, G A Barr
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    ABSTRACT: Young rats become immobile when exposed to a potentially infanticidal adult male rat. Male-induced immobility declines during the preweaning period, paralleling the decrease in infanticidal threat. To investigate the neural substrates underlying the developmental change in immobility, male-induced expression of the immediate-early gene c-fos was assessed on postnatal days 7, 14 and 21. A huddle of three young rats was exposed to an adult male behind a screen. As control, three littermates were put in the testing chamber but not exposed to the male. On day 7, male exposed and control pups were immobile most of the time and c-fos expression did not differ between conditions. On day 14, rats in the presence of the male stopped ongoing behaviors and became immobile. They had significantly higher c-fos expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, the amygdala, the periaqueductal gray, and the locus ceruleus. On day 21, the male-exposed rats that were immobile had elevated c-fos expression in a similar pattern as on day 14, however, different nuclei of the amygdala were activated. In contrast, male-exposed 21-day-old rats that showed control levels of immobility did not have elevated c-fos expression in these areas. These results demonstrate that male exposure induced c-fos expression in brain areas of young rats in an age-specific pattern. Some of the activated brain areas seem to have contributed to immobility. Differential activation of neuronal populations may underlie developmental changes in defensive immobility during early ontogeny.
    Behavioural Brain Research 12/2001; 126(1-2):147-57. · 3.33 Impact Factor
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    C P Wiedenmayer, G A Barr
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    ABSTRACT: During early ontogeny, stimuli that pose a threat to an animal change. Unrelated adult male rats may kill young rats, but infanticide ends around weaning. Predation, on the other hand, may increase during early ontogeny when rats begin to extend their activity range. We investigated the developmental course of two defensive responses, immobility and analgesia, in young rats exposed to an adult male rat or to predator cues. Preweaning 14-day-old rats became immobile and analgesic when exposed to the male and showed immobility but not analgesia when exposed to cat odor. On Day 26, around weaning, the presence of the male rat no longer induced immobility and analgesia whereas cat odor produced higher levels of immobility and analgesia compared to control and male-exposed animals. This developmental change in responsivity may reflect the differences in the risk of being harmed by a male or a cat during different periods of ontogeny.
    Developmental Psychobiology 08/2001; 39(1):1-7. · 2.60 Impact Factor
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    C P Wiedenmayer, M M Myers, M Mayford, G A Barr
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    ABSTRACT: Spatial learning and memory involves the ability to encode geometric relationships between perceived cues and depends critically on the hippocampus. Visually guided spatial learning has been demonstrated in adult animals. As infant animals rely heavily on olfaction, olfactory based spatial learning was assessed in infant mice. When 12-day-old pups were displaced from their nest, they learned within a few training trials to use the spatial pattern of odor cues to move back to the nest. However, mouse pups that over-expressed Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII) in hippocampal neurons were impaired in olfactory based spatial learning.
    Neuroreport 05/2000; 11(5):1051-5. · 1.40 Impact Factor
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    C P Wiedenmayer, G A Goodwin, G A Barr
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    ABSTRACT: During early ontogeny infant rats show specific responses to a variety of age-dependent threatening situations. When isolated from nest and dam, they emit ultrasonic vocalizations and show decreased reactivity to noxious stimulation, or analgesia. When exposed to an unfamiliar adult male, they become immobile and analgesic. The midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) is an important area within the circuitry that controls responses to threatening stimuli in the adult. Little is known about the functions of the PAG in early life. It was hypothesized that the PAG mediates the responses to the age-specific threats social isolation and male exposure in the infant rat. Rat pups were lesioned electrolytically either in the lateral or the ventrolateral PAG on postnatal day 7, tested in social isolation on day 10, and exposed to a male on day 14. On day 10 during isolation, ultrasonic vocalizations and isolation-induced analgesia were decreased in both lesion groups. On day 14, male-induced immobility and analgesia were decreased in ventrally lesioned animals. In conclusion, the PAG seems to play a developmentally continuous role in age-specific responses to threat such as ultrasonic vocalization, analgesia, and immobility.
    Developmental Brain Research 05/2000; 120(2):191-8. · 1.78 Impact Factor
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    C P Wiedenmayer, G A Barr
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    ABSTRACT: Rat pups become immobile and analgesic when exposed to an adult male rat. The aim of this study was to determine whether these reactions are under the control of endogenous opioids and to determine the role of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG), which mediates stress-induced immobility and analgesia in adult animals. In Experiment 1, 14-day-old rats were injected systemically with the general opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (1 mg/kg), which blocked male-induced analgesia to thermal stimulation but did not affect immobility. In Experiment 2, the selective mu opioid receptor antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTOP; 50 or 100 ng/200 nl) was microinjected into the ventrolateral and lateral PAG. CTOP suppressed male-induced analgesia when injected into the ventrolateral PAG. Male-induced immobility was not affected by CTOP. Male proximity therefore seems to induce analgesia in rat pups by releasing endogenous opioids that bind to mu opioid receptors in the ventrolateral PAG.
    Behavioral Neuroscience 03/2000; 114(1):125-36. · 2.63 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

303 Citations
91.61 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2000–2011
    • New York State Psychiatric Institute
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 1998–2011
    • Columbia University
      • Department of Psychiatry
      New York City, NY, United States
    • CUNY Graduate Center
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 2007
    • University of Cambridge
      • Sub-Department of Animal Behaviour
      Cambridge, ENG, United Kingdom