William A H Wallace

The Bracton Centre, Oxleas NHS Trust, Дартфорде, England, United Kingdom

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Publications (37)252.54 Total impact

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    American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 02/2014; 189(4):500-1. · 11.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) continues to have poor prognosis with a 2 year survival of less than 20%. Recent studies have suggested that SCLC may affect the immune system to allow it to evade immunological responses. We hypothesised that any such effect would be characterised by a decrease in lymphoid cells associated with tumour in biopsies and that this might relate to patient outcome. METHODS Sixty-four SCLC biopsies were immunohistochemically stained with anti-CD45 antibody to identify immune cells associated with tumour. A mean CD45 count per high power field for each case was obtained and the results correlated with age, sex, stage, performance status (PS), treatment with chemotherapy / radiotherapy and overall survival. RESULTS The median CD45 count for all cases was taken as 40 (CD4540). Kaplan-Meier plots demonstrated better survival for patients with a CD4540 >40 (p<0.009). No relationship between CD4540 and age, sex , stage, treatment by chemotherapy or radiotherapy was identified. While PS was a significant predictor of survival (p=0.014) it did not correlate with CD4540. In patients with better ECOG performance status (PS ≤ 2) the CD4540 demonstrated a highly significant survival advantage for those with CD4540 >40 (p<0.0001). CONCLUSIONS The data indicate that a) simple immunohistochemical assessment of immune cell infiltrates in routinely processed and stained biopsies of primary tumours can provide prognostic information in SCLC; and, b) tumour associated CD45+ cells in SCLC biopsies may be a good clinical marker to identify patients with poor prognosis despite good PS.
    Chest 07/2012; · 5.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Rationale: Acute lung injury (ALI) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality, with no currently effective pharmacological therapies. Neutrophils have been specifically implicated in the pathogenesis of ALI, and there has been significant research into the mechanisms of early neutrophil recruitment, but those controlling the later phases of neutrophil emigration that characterize disease are poorly understood. Objectives: To determine the influence of peripheral blood monocytes (PBMs) in established ALI. Methods: In a murine model of LPS-induced ALI, three separate models of conditional monocyte ablation were used: systemic liposomal clodronate (sLC), inducible depletion using CD11b diphtheria toxin receptor (CD11b DTR) transgenic mice, and antibody-dependent ablation of CCR2(hi) monocytes. Measurements and Main Results: PBMs play a critical role in regulating neutrophil emigration in established murine LPS-induced lung injury. Gr1(hi) and Gr1(lo) PBM subpopulations contribute to this process. PBM depletion is associated with a significant reduction in measures of lung injury. The specificity of PBM depletion was demonstrated by replenishment studies in which the effects were reversed by systemic PBM infusion but not by systemic or local pulmonary infusion of mature macrophages or lymphocytes. Conclusions: These results suggest that PBMs, or the mechanisms by which they influence pulmonary neutrophil emigration, could represent therapeutic targets in established ALI.
    American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 07/2012; 186(6):514-24. · 11.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Acute tissue injury is often considered in the context of a wound. The host response to wounding is an orchestrated series of events, the fundamentals of which are preserved across all multicellular organisms. In the human lung, there are a myriad of causes of injury, but only a limited number of consequences: complete resolution, persistent and/or overwhelming inflammation, a combination of resolution/remodelling with fibrosis or progressive fibrosis. In all cases where complete resolution does not occur, there is the potential for significant ongoing morbidity and ultimately death through respiratory failure. In this review, we consider the elements of injury, resolution and repair as they occur in the lung. We specifically focus on the role of the macrophage, long considered to have a pivotal role in regulating the host response to injury and tissue repair.
    International Journal of Experimental Pathology 07/2012; 93(4):243-51. · 2.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) kills at least one person every 2 hr in the United Kingdom. Some patients do relatively well but most have rapidly progressive disease. There is no effective treatment and overall 2-year survival is less than 5%. Patients with SCLC have poorly understood local and systemic immune defects and can be immunocompromised. As CD4(+) T lymphocytes coordinate and regulate immunity, a better understanding of interactions between SCLC tumour cells and CD4(+) T cells may lead to effective molecular immunotherapy. We show that some, but not all, SCLC tumour cell lines secrete molecules that induce IL-10 secretion by and de novo differentiation of functional CD4(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+)CD127(lo)Helios(-) regulatory T (Treg) cells in healthy blood lymphocytes. FOXP3(+) T cells were found in SCLC tumour biopsies, and patients with higher ratios of FOXP3(+) cells in tumour infiltrates have a worse survival rate. The inhibitory effect of SCLC tumour cells was not affected by blocking IL-10 receptor or TGF-β signalling but was partially reversed by blocking IL-15, which is reported to be involved in human Treg cells induction. IL-15 was secreted by SCLC cells that inhibited CD4(+) T-cell proliferation and was present in SCLC biopsy tumour cells. These novel findings demonstrate that SCLC tumour cells can induce CD4(+) T-cell-mediated immunosuppression. This gives a potential mechanism by which SCLC tumour cells may downregulate local and systemic immune responses and contribute to poor patient survival. Our data suggest that IL-15 and Treg cells are potential new therapeutic targets to improve immune response and patient survival in SCLC.
    International Journal of Cancer 04/2012; 131(6):E928-37. · 6.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Large production volumes of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONP) might be anticipated to pose risks, of accidental inhalation in occupational and even in consumer settings. Herein, we further investigated the pathological changes induced by ZnONP and their possible mechanism of action. Two doses of ZnONP (50 and 150 cm2/rat) were intratracheally instilled into the lungs of rats with assessments made at 24 h, 1 wk, and 4 wks after instillation to evaluate dose- and time-course responses. Assessments included bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid analysis, histological analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and IgE and IgA measurement in the serum and BAL fluid. To evaluate the mechanism, alternative ZnONP, ZnONP-free bronchoalveolar lavage exudate, and dissolved Zn2+ (92.5 μg/rat) were also instilled to rats. Acridine orange staining was utilized in macrophages in culture to evaluate the lysosomal membrane destabilization by NP. ZnONP induced eosinophilia, proliferation of airway epithelial cells, goblet cell hyperplasia, and pulmonary fibrosis. Bronchocentric interstitial pulmonary fibrosis at the chronic phase was associated with increased myofibroblast accumulation and transforming growth factor-β positivity. Serum IgE levels were up-regulated by ZnONP along with the eosinophilia whilst serum IgA levels were down-regulated by ZnONP. ZnONP are rapidly dissolved under acidic conditions (pH 4.5) whilst they remained intact around neutrality (pH 7.4). The instillation of dissolved Zn2+ into rat lungs showed similar pathologies (eg., eosinophilia, bronchocentric interstitial fibrosis) as were elicited by ZnONP. Lysosomal stability was decreased and cell death resulted following treatment of macrophages with ZnONP in vitro. We hypothesise that rapid, pH-dependent dissolution of ZnONP inside of phagosomes is the main cause of ZnONP-induced diverse progressive severe lung injuries.
    Particle and Fibre Toxicology 09/2011; 8:27. · 9.18 Impact Factor
  • W A H Wallace, D M Rassl
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    ABSTRACT: Endoscopic ultrasound-guided transbronchial or transoesophageal lymph node aspiration is increasingly used as a method of diagnosing nonsmall cell carcinoma. Data validating the accuracy of cell typing of nonsmall cell carcinoma using these cytological samples has not been assessed. 23 samples were identified in Edinburgh, UK and a further 25 in Cambridge, UK, with matching histological samples. The morphological cell type, as assessed on the cytological preparations and cell blocks, was recorded and immunohistochemical staining was performed, where possible, as an adjunct. The final cell type, as assessed by morphology with or without immunohistochemistry, was correlated with that reported in the paired histological samples. Cell blocks with tumour were available in 39 out of 48 cases. The accuracy of cell typing when no cell block was available was four out of nine cases. This increased to 25 out of 39 when a cell block was available, increasing to 33 out of 39 with the addition of immunohistochemistry. The overall accuracy of classification was 37 out of 48 cases. Accurate cell typing of nonsmall cell carcinomas can be performed using endoscopically derived fine-needle aspirates. The importance of obtaining sufficient material for the production of cell blocks is critical in allowing optimal assessment.
    European Respiratory Journal 03/2011; 38(4):911-7. · 6.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Therapeutic approaches to lung cancer are evolving, with personalized therapy, based on "molecular analysis" of tumors being developed. Given that approximately 90% of patients will not undergo surgery for their disease, an ability to apply these tests to small samples obtained at the time of initial pathological diagnosis is desirable. Studies in this area have produced variable results, and the minimum area of tumor tissue required for analysis has not been defined. Furthermore, such assays have not been widely applied to cytology specimens, which may be the only source of diagnostic material in many cases. Routinely processed biopsy and cytology specimens were microdissected to enrich for tumor cells, followed by RNA extraction using QIAGEN RNeasy kit and cDNA synthesis/reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for genes including beta-actin, ERCC-1, and RRM-1, according to standard laboratory protocols. Paired biopsy and resection specimens were similarly analyzed. As little as 1 mm² of tumor tissue, from a 10-μm-thick section, may be used to produce RNA suitable for analysis. RNA of adequate quality and quantity for analysis may be obtained from residual, routinely processed biopsy and cytology specimens. There is good correlation between the result obtained on the tumor biopsy specimen and paired blocks from the surgical resection with respect to clinical decision making. Routinely processed clinical diagnostic samples provide a suitable source of RNA for polymerase chain reaction-based molecular analyses, potentially providing personalized medicine to all lung cancer patients.
    Journal of thoracic oncology: official publication of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer 02/2011; 6(5):884-8. · 4.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A proportion of human pulmonary adenocarcinomas has been shown previously to express an antigen related to the Gag protein of a betaretrovirus, Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus, that causes ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma. To investigate further the hypothesis that a retrovirus might be present in human lung adenocarcinoma, we examined specimens from patients with lung cancer for evidence of retroviral infection by immunohistochemistry, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting and cDNA library screening. Thirty-eight percent of the tumor samples analyzed were positive by immunohistochemistry for Gag-related antigen of Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus. However, this antigen was not detected by immunoblotting using the same antiserum. In addition, plasma samples from the patients did not contain antibodies reacting with Gag proteins from Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus or other betaretroviruses on immunoblots. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction identified the expression of endogenous betaretroviruses in tumor tissue and in normal lung tissue, but no specific provirus was associated with tumor. Expression library screening did not identify the Gag-reactive antigen. This study has confirmed the expression of a Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus Gag-related antigen in some human lung tumors but additional evidence of betaretroviral infection was not obtained. While these data do not rule out a role for a retrovirus in human pulmonary adenocarcinomas, they suggest that, if such a virus is present, it is unrelated to known betaretroviruses.
    Human pathology 11/2010; 41(11):1631-40. · 3.03 Impact Factor
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    Paul M Fitch, Sarah E M Howie, William A H Wallace
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    ABSTRACT: Idiopathic interstitial lung diseases (iILDs) are characterized by inflammation, hyperplasia of Type-II alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) and lung remodelling often with progressive fibrosis. It remains unclear which signals initiate iILD and/or maintain the disease processes. Using real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry on archival biopsies of three patterns of iILD (usual interstitial pneumonitis/UIP, non-specific interstitial pneumonitis/NSIP and cryptogenic organizing pneumonia/COP) we investigated whether hedgehog signalling (previously associated with lung damage and repair) was functional and whether the damage associated extracellular matrix protein tenascin-C was present in activated Type-II AECs in all three iILDs. Using tissue culture, protein and mRNA detection we also determined how two signals (oxidative damage and TGF-β) associated with iILD pathogenesis affected Sonic hedgehog (SHH) and tenascin-C production by a Type-II AEC cell line. We report that SHH pathway and tenascin-C mRNA and proteins were found in UIP, NSIP and COP. SHH signalling was most active at sites of immature organizing fibrous tissue (fibroblastic foci) in UIP. In vitro Type-II AECs constitutively secrete SHH but not tenascin-C. Oxidative injury stimulated SHH release whereas TGF-β inhibited it. TGF-β and oxidative damage both upregulated tenascin-C mRNA but only TGF-β induced synthesis and release of a distinct protein isoform. SHH signalling is active in Type-II AECs from three types of ILD and all three express tenascin-C.
    International Journal of Experimental Pathology 10/2010; 92(1):8-17. · 2.04 Impact Factor
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    William A H Wallace
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    ABSTRACT: The lung is a common site for primary carcinomas as well as a wide range of metastatic carcinomas and other rarer primary and secondary tumours that clinically and radiologically may mimic lung cancer. The World Health Organization classification of lung tumours is based on the morphological appearances in resected specimens. This provides a widely applicable system for classification, which, although complex, can be applied universally. The vast majority of patients with lung cancer, however, do not have their tumours resected, and the application of the same classification system to small biopsy specimens is problematic due in large part to sampling. Recognition of this has led to the widespread use of the term 'non-small cell carcinoma'. Future developments in our understanding of lung cancer and the development of novel targeted therapies may mean that in the future classification will become based more on the molecular features of tumours that predict response to therapies and prognosis rather than simple morphology. The predictive validity of such an approach using small biopsy or cytology specimens, however, still requires to be established. The problem of tumour heterogeneity, which is problematic for morphological classification, may also pose similar challenges for molecular approaches.
    Histopathology 02/2009; 54(1):28-42. · 2.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Carbon nanotubes have distinctive characteristics, but their needle-like fibre shape has been compared to asbestos, raising concerns that widespread use of carbon nanotubes may lead to mesothelioma, cancer of the lining of the lungs caused by exposure to asbestos. Here we show that exposing the mesothelial lining of the body cavity of mice, as a surrogate for the mesothelial lining of the chest cavity, to long multiwalled carbon nanotubes results in asbestos-like, length-dependent, pathogenic behaviour. This includes inflammation and the formation of lesions known as granulomas. This is of considerable importance, because research and business communities continue to invest heavily in carbon nanotubes for a wide range of products under the assumption that they are no more hazardous than graphite. Our results suggest the need for further research and great caution before introducing such products into the market if long-term harm is to be avoided.
    Nature Nanotechnology 07/2008; 3(7):423-8. · 31.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To examine the roles of endogenous K-ras 4A and K-ras 4B splice variants in tumorigenesis, murine lung carcinogenesis was induced by N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU), which causes a K-ras mutation (G12D) that jointly affects both isoforms. Compared with age-matched K-ras(tmDelta4A/-) mice (where tumours can express mutationally activated K-ras 4B only), tumour number and size were significantly higher in K-ras(+/-) mice (where tumours can also express mutationally activated K-ras 4A), and significantly lower in K-ras(tmDelta4A/tmDelta4A) mice (where tumours can express both wild-type and activated K-ras 4B). MNU induced significantly more, and larger, tumours in wild-type than K-ras(tmDelta4A/tmDelta4A) mice which differ in that only tumours in wild-type mice can express wild-type and activated K-ras 4A. Lung tumours in all genotypes were predominantly papillary adenomas, and tumours from K-ras(+/-) and K-ras(tmDelta4A/-) mice exhibited phospho-Erk1/2 and phospho-Akt staining. Hence (1) mutationally activated K-ras 4B is sufficient to activate the Raf/MEK/ERK(MAPK) and PI3-K/Akt pathways, and initiate lung tumorigenesis, (2) when expressed with activated K-ras 4B, mutationally activated K-ras 4A further promotes lung tumour formation and growth (both in the presence and absence of its wild-type isoform) but does not affect either tumour pathology or progression, and (3) wild-type K-ras 4B, either directly or indirectly, reduces tumour number and size.
    Experimental Cell Research 04/2008; 314(5):1105-14. · 3.56 Impact Factor
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    W Stephen Waring, William A H Wallace
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    ABSTRACT: Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are uncommonly used due to their high frequency of adverse effects, including tachycardia and hypertension. Recently, there has been renewed interest in the role of this class of drugs in treating a variety of psychiatric disorders. The clinical features of MAOI overdose are poorly characterised. This paper describes a novel cardiac complication of phenelzine toxicity in a previously healthy young adult with no history of cardiovascular disease. A 23-year-old woman presented to hospital after massive phenelzine overdose, and the clinical features and pathological findings are discussed in light of existing literature. Clinical features of phenelzine toxicity included reduced consciousness level, seizures, and tachycardia, in keeping with previous reports. Unexpectedly, the patient developed severe and unexplained hypotension and impaired left ventricular function, and died 3 days after initial presentation. Post-mortem examination confirmed high serum phenelzine concentrations (4.1 mg/L) and histopathological features that were consistent with drug-induced acute myocarditis. Acute myocarditis was attributed to phenelzine in the absence of any plausible alternative explanation. This possible complication should be considered in patients who develop unexplained hypotension after phenelzine overdose.
    European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology 12/2007; 63(11):1007-9. · 2.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Optimal management of patients with lung cancer requires accurate cell typing of tumours and staging at the time of diagnosis. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided lymph node aspiration as a method of diagnosing and staging lung cancer is a relatively new technique. To report the use of liquid-based-thin-layer cytology for the processing and reporting of these specimens. The specimens obtained from 80 patients were processed using the ThinPrep system, with the remainder of the samples being processed as a cell block. 40 of the 81 procedures yielded malignant cells (30 non-small cell carcinoma, 8 small-cell carcinoma and 2 combined small-cell carcinoma/non-small-cell carcinoma). The cell blocks were found to contain sufficient material to allow the immunohistochemical characterisation of tumour cells with a range of antibodies. The use of liquid-based-thin-layer cytological techniques provides high-quality specimens for diagnostic purposes. When used in conjunction with cell blocks, sufficient material may be obtained to allow immunohistochemical studies to confirm the tumour cell type. Given the current move towards centralisation of pathology services, this approach gives the pathologist high-quality specimens without the need for direct onsite support at the time of the procedure.
    Journal of Clinical Pathology 05/2007; 60(4):388-91. · 2.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fibrosis by common usage in the pathological and clinical literature is the end result of a healing process and synonymous with scarring. We would argue that its use to describe a dynamic series of events which may be reversible is unhelpful and that the term 'lung remodelling' is a better description for this process as it reflects changes in tissue organization that may or may not progress to 'fibrosis' as a final fixed point. Resolution, through reversal of active lung remodelling, by therapeutic intervention is possible providing the alveolar architecture remains intact. If the lung architecture is lost then healing by permanent fibrosis with loss of organ function is inevitable.
    International Journal of Experimental Pathology 05/2007; 88(2):103-10. · 2.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Staphylococcus aureus is a pathogen often found in pneumonia and sepsis. In the context of the resistance of this organism to conventional antibiotics, an understanding of the regulation of natural endogenous antimicrobial molecules is of paramount importance. Previous studies have shown that both human and mouse airways express a variety of these molecules, including defensins, cathelicidins, and the four-disulfide core protein secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor. We demonstrate here by culturing mouse tracheal epithelial cells at an air-liquid interface that, despite the production of Defb1, Defb14, and Defr1 in this system, these cells are unable to clear S. aureus when exposed to this respiratory pathogen. Using an adenovirus (Ad)-mediated gene transfer strategy, we show that overexpression of elafin, an anti-elastase/antimicrobial molecule (also a member of the four-disulfide core protein family), dramatically improves the clearance of S. aureus. In addition, we also demonstrate that this overexpression is efficient in vivo and that intratracheal instillation of Ad-elafin significantly reduced the lung bacterial load and demonstrates concomitant anti-inflammatory activity by reducing neutrophil numbers and markers of lung inflammation, such as bronchoalveolar lavage levels of tumor necrosis factor and myeloperoxidase. These findings show that an increased antimicrobial activity phenotype is provided by the elafin molecule and have implications for its use in S. aureus-associated local and systemic infections.
    Infection and Immunity 07/2005; 73(6):3609-17. · 4.07 Impact Factor
  • R Al-Jamal, W A H Wallace, D J Harrison
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    ABSTRACT: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a clinical syndrome presenting as progressive airflow limitation that is poorly reversible as a result of bronchitis and emphysema. The prevalence of COPD is alarming and even more so its current and projected impact on morbidity and mortality. To date, there are no effective treatments for emphysema, nor are there efficient clinical management strategies. Existing and prospective therapies, although promising, have yet to demonstrate their efficacy to slow, halt or reverse the disease. Novel approaches using gene therapy and stem cell technologies may offer new opportunities. However, this will remain almost entirely dependent on a more thorough understanding of the pathogenesis of COPD. This review is not aimed at highlighting the vast effort of studying COPD, but rather describing the state of the field in an abstract fashion to expose the focus of research efforts to date, which has primarily been limited to predisposing factors and inflammation. We would like to draw attention to other elements of the disease, such as the alveolar remodelling that characterises emphysema. Although the main cause may prove to be elusive, carefully designed clinical treatment and management may deliver the required therapeutic outcome.
    Expert opinion on biological therapy 04/2005; 5(3):333-46. · 3.22 Impact Factor
  • Lynda Ferrigan, William A H Wallace
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    ABSTRACT: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) expression in resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has been associated with a poor prognosis. Specific inhibitors have been developed to these molecules and have entered into clinical practice. We performed immunohistochemical staining on a series of 36 resected cases of NSCLC in parallel with the associated preoperative diagnostic biopsies in order to determine whether expression of these markers in the tumour could reliably be predicted from the result obtained with the small diagnostic biopsy. The results demonstrated considerable intratumour heterogeneity of expression for both markers in the resected tumours, and this was associated with a poor negative predictive value for the result obtained with the diagnostic biopsy. We conclude that, staining small diagnostic biopsies for EGFR and MMP9 is unlikely to be helpful in defining tumour status for these markers and allowing targeted therapy.
    European Journal of Cancer 08/2004; 40(10):1589-92. · 5.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There have been few inter-observer studies of diffuse parenchymal lung disease (DPLD), but the recent ATS/ERS consensus classification provides a basis for such a study. A method for categorising numerically the percentage likelihood of these differential diagnoses was developed, and the diagnostic confidence of pathologists using this classification and the reproducibility of their diagnoses were assessed. The overall kappa coefficient of agreement for the first choice diagnosis was 0.38 (n = 133 biopsies), increasing to 0.43 for patients (n = 83) with multiple biopsies. Weighted kappa coefficients of agreement, quantifying the level of probability of individual diagnoses, were moderate to good (mean 0.58, range 0.40-0.75). However, in 18% of biopsy specimens the diagnosis was given with low confidence. Over 50% of inter-observer variation related to the diagnosis of non-specific interstitial pneumonia and, in particular, its distinction from usual interstitial pneumonia. These results show that the ATS/ERS classification can be applied reproducibly by pathologists who evaluate DPLD routinely, and support the practice of taking multiple biopsy specimens.
    Thorax 07/2004; 59(6):500-5. · 8.38 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
252.54 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2002–2011
    • The Bracton Centre, Oxleas NHS Trust
      Дартфорде, England, United Kingdom
  • 1995–2009
    • The University of Edinburgh
      • • Division of Pathology
      • • College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine
      Edinburgh, SCT, United Kingdom
  • 2001
    • Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
      Sheffield, England, United Kingdom