S. Tamminga

Wageningen University, Wageningen, Provincie Gelderland, Netherlands

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Publications (473)207.73 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Fractional passage rates form a fundamental element within modern feed evaluation systems for ruminants, but knowledge on feed-specific fractional passage is largely lacking. Commonly applied tracer techniques based on externally applied markers, such as chromium-mordanted neutral detergent fibre (Cr-NDF), have been criticised for behaving differently to feed particles. This study describes the use of the carbon stable isotope ratio (13C : 12C) as an internal digesta marker to quantify the fractional passage rate of concentrates through the digestive tract of dairy cows. In a crossover study, five dairy cows were fed low (24.6%) and high (52.6%) levels of concentrates (dry matter (DM) basis) and received a pulse-dosed Cr-NDF and 13C isotopes. The latter was administered orally by exchanging part of the dietary concentrates of low 13C natural abundance with a pulse dose of maize bran-based concentrates of high 13C natural abundance. Fractional passage rates from the rumen (K 1) and from the large intestine (K 2) were determined from faecal marker concentrations of Cr-NDF and of 13C in the DM (13C-DM), NDF (13C-NDF) and neutral detergent soluble (13C-NDS). No differences in K 1 estimates were found for the two concentrate levels fed but significant differences between markers (P<0.001) were observed. Faecal Cr-NDF excretions gave lower K 1 estimates (0.037-0.039/h) than 13C-DM (0.054-0.056/h) and 13C-NDF (0.061-0.063/h). The 13C-NDS was calculated by the difference of 13C in the DM and NDF, and K 1 values (0.039-0.043/h) were comparable to Cr-NDF. Total mean retention time was considerably higher for Cr-NDF (40.9-42.0 h) as compared to 13C-DM and 13C-NDF (32.0-33.5 h; P<0.001). The accuracy of the curve fits for Cr-NDF and 13C-DM and 13C-NDF was overall good (mean prediction error of 9.9-13.9%). Fractional passage rate of Cr-NDF was comparable to studies where this marker was assumed to represent the fractional passage of roughages. However, K 1 estimates based on the 13C : 12C ratio varied considerably from studies based on external markers. Our results suggest that the use of 13C isotopes as digesta passage markers can provide feed component-specific K 1 estimates for concentrates and provides new insight into passage kinetics of NDF from technologically treated compound feed.
    animal 09/2013; · 1.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to assess the effects of restricting access time to pasture and time of grazing allocation on grazing behaviour, daily dry matter intake (DMI), rumen fermentation, milk production and composition in dairy cows. Twenty-one autumn calving Holstein cows were assigned to one of the following 3 treatments: providing access to a daily strip of pasture for either 8 h between 07:00 and 15:00 h (T7–15), 4 h between 07:00 and 11:00 h (T7–11), or 4 h between 11:00 and 15:00 h (T11–15). The experimental period consisted of 3 weeks of adaptation and 6 weeks of measurements. Cows were offered a daily herbage allowance of 18 kg DM/cow to ground level, 6.1 kg DM/day of a ground sorghum grain-based supplement and 5.2 kg DM/day of maize silage. Milk yield was greater for cows with 8 h access time to the pasture (25.4 vs. 24.1 for 8 and 4 h access time, respectively). Milk yield was not different between cows that access early (T7–11) or late (T11–15) to the grazing session. Milk protein yield was greater for cows with 8 h access time (0.75 kg/d) vs. 4 h access time treatments (0.72 kg/d). Cows with late access time to grazing in the morning produce more protein (0.74 kg/d) than cows with early access to the pasture (0.70 kg/d). Duration of access had a significant effect on herbage DMI (8.3 vs. 6.6 kg/d, for 8 and 4 h access, respectively), but there was no significant effect of time of grazing allocation. Intakes of concentrate and maize silage DM did not differ between treatments. Pasture depletion rate was significantly slower when cows had access to the pasture for 8 h compared with 4 h (0.04 vs. 0.09 cm/h), but was not affected by allocation time in the 4-h treatments. Cows grazed for significantly longer in treatment T7–11 than T11–15, achieved significantly more biting and non-biting grazing jaw movements. However, because herbage DMI did not differ between treatments T7–11 and T11–15, it appears that cows grazed more efficiency on treatment T11–15. The present study showed that reducing the period of access to pasture from 8 to 4 h decreases DMI and milk production. Cows that started their 4-h grazing session later in the morning (T11–15) produced more protein than cows that started earlier (T7–11), probably as a consequence of a larger bite mass and a tendency for higher intake rate. Rumen pH of cows grazing on treatment T11–15 declined faster than in cows on T7–11, which is in accordance with the higher VFA and ammonia rumen concentrations observed after the grazing session started.
    Livestock Science 01/2013; 152(1):53-62. · 1.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the current study was to explore the use of the tracer 13C as an internal marker to assess feed fraction-specific digesta passage kinetics through the digestive tract of dairy cows. Knowledge on feed-specific fractional passage rates is essential to improve estimations on the extent of rumen degradation and microbial protein efficiency; however, this information is largely lacking. An in vivo and in vitro experiment was conducted with grass silages (Lolium perenne L.) that were enriched with 13C by growing the grass under elevated 13CO2 conditions. In a crossover design, two dairy cows received pulse doses of two 13C-enriched grass silages and chromium-mordanted neutral detergent fibre (Cr-NDF) into the rumen. The two 13C-enriched grass silages used differed in digestibility and were grown under identical field conditions as the bulk silages fed to the animals. Faecal excretion patterns of 13C-enriched dry matter (13C-DM), neutral detergent fibre (13C-NDF) and Cr-NDF were established, and a nonlinear multicompartmental model was used to determine their rumen passage kinetics. In addition, the 13C-enriched silages were incubated in rumen liquid in an in vitro batch culture system at different time intervals to determine the effect of fermentation on 13C-enrichment in the residue. The in vitro study showed that the 13C : 12C ratios in DM and NDF residues remained stable from 24 h of incubation onwards. In addition, in vitro fractional degradation rates for 12C in the DM and NDF did not differ from those of 13C, indicating that fermentative degradation does not affect the 13C : 12C ratio in the DM nor in the NDF fraction of the residue. Model fits to the faecal excretion curves showed a significant difference in fractional rumen passage rates between Cr-NDF, 13C-DM and 13C-NDF (P ⩽ 0.025). Silage type had no clear effect on rumen passage kinetics (P ⩾ 0.081). Moreover, it showed that peak enrichments for 13C-DM and 13C-NDF in faeces were reached at 30.7 and 41.7 h post dosing, respectively. This is well after the time (24 h) when the 13C : 12C ratios of the in vitro unfermented residues have reached stable enrichment level. Fractional rate constants for particle passage from the rumen are estimated from the descending slope of faecal excretion curves. The present study shows that the decline in 13C : 12C ratio after peak enrichment is not affected by fermentative degradation and therefore can be used to assess feed component-specific fractional passage rates.
    animal 12/2012; · 1.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the current Dutch protein evaluation system (the DVE/OEB1991 system), two characteristics are calculated for each feed: true protein digested in the intestine (DVE) and the rumen degradable protein balance (OEB). Of these, DVE represents the protein value of a feed, while OEB is the difference between the potential microbial protein synthesis (MPS) on the basis of available rumen degradable protein and that on the basis of available rumen degradable energy. DVE can be separated into three components: (i) feed crude protein undegraded in the rumen but digested in the small intestine, (ii) microbial true protein synthesized in the rumen and digested in the small intestine, and (iii) endogenous protein lost in the digestive processes.Based on new research findings, the DVE/OEB1991 system has recently been updated to the DVE/OEB2010 system. More detail and differentiation is included concerning the representation of chemical components in feed, the rumen degradation characteristics of these components, the efficiency of MPS and the fractional passage rates. For each chemical component, the soluble, washout, potentially degradable and truly non-degradable fractions are defined with separate fractional degradation rates. Similarly, fractional passage rates for each of these fractions were identified and partly expressed as a function of fractional degradation rate. Efficiency of MPS is related to the various fractions of the chemical components and their associated fractional passage rates. Only minor changes were made with respect to the amount of DVE required for maintenance and production purposes of the animal. Differences from other current protein evaluation systems, viz. the Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein system and the Feed into Milk system, are discussed.
    The Journal of Agricultural Science 05/2011; 149(03):351 - 367. · 2.88 Impact Factor
  • Euphytica 01/2011; · 1.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the current Dutch protein evaluation system (the DVE/OEB1991 system), two characteristics are calculated for each feed: true protein digested in the intestine (DVE) and the rumen degradable protein balance (OEB). Of these, DVE represents the protein value of a feed, while OEB is the difference between the potential microbial protein synthesis (MPS) on the basis of available rumen degradable protein and that on the basis of available rumen degradable energy. DVE can be separated into three components: (i) feed crude protein undegraded in the rumen but digested in the small intestine, (ii) microbial true protein synthesized in the rumen and digested in the small intestine, and (iii) endogenous protein lost in the digestive processes. Based on new research findings, the DVE/OEB1991 system has recently been updated to the DVE/OEB2010 system. More detail and differentiation is included concerning the representation of chemical components in feed, the rumen degradation characteristics of these components, the efficiency of MPS and the fractional passage rates. For each chemical component, the soluble, washout, potentially degradable and truly non-degradable fractions are defined with separate fractional degradation rates. Similarly, fractional passage rates for each of these fractions were identified and partly expressed as a function of fractional degradation rate. Efficiency of MPS is related to the various fractions of the chemical components and their associated fractional passage rates. Only minor changes were made with respect to the amount of DVE required for maintenance and production purposes of the animal. Differences from other current protein evaluation systems, viz. the Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein system and the Feed into Milk system, are discussed.
    Journal of Agricultural Science - J AGR SCI. 01/2011; 149(3):351-367.
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    ABSTRACT: Most supplementation experiments with fodder trees including S. sesban have been of short duration and focused mainly on feed intake and growth rate. Long-term studies regarding the effects of feeding S. sesban on reproductive performance of sheep particularly in both sexes are scanty. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of S. sesban on feed intake, post-weaning growth rate, and onset of puberty of male and female lambs. Sixty weaned female and 60 male Ethiopian highland sheep in weight and age ranging between 7.2 and 11.8 kg and 4 and 5 months respectively were evaluated for a period of 9 months supplemented with three levels of S. sesban (0, 47.5 and 95% of supplementary protein provided by S. sesban and the rest being provided by a mix of concentrates). Between sex groups male sheep, and among treatments animals fed with 47.5 and 95% Sesbania in the supplement had significantly (P < 0.05) higher basal feed, supplement, and total feed intake than those supplemented with concentrate alone. Supplementation with Sesbania resulted in significantly (P < 0.05) higher DM, OM and N digestibility than supplementation with sole concentrates. Supplementation with 95% Sesbania elicited higher daily weight gain than supplementation with 47.5% Sesbania and sole concentrates over the growth period. The onset of puberty was at 265 (± 36) and 342 (± 45) days of age and puberty weight was 15.2 and 14.6 kg for ram and ewe-lambs respectively. Ram-lambs fed with 47.5% and 95% Sesbania in the supplement reached puberty by 34 and 21 days earlier and were 1.4 kg heavier (P < 0.05) than those fed concentrates. Ewe-lambs supplemented with 47.5 and 95% Sesbania were faster (P < 0.05) to attain puberty by 43 and 37 days than those supplemented with sole concentrates. The average scrotum circumference gain (SCF) until the onset of puberty was 0.5 (± 0.1) mm¿ d. Supplementation with Sesbania improved SCF gain but was not statistically significant (P > 0.05) among treatments. Mean P4 (progesterone) concentrations during the first behavioural oestrus ranged from non-detectable levels to a peak of 4.32 ng/ml at mid-cycle without significant difference (P > 0.05) among treatments. Therefore, it can be concluded that inclusion of S. sesban as a supplement up to 30% of the ration improved feed intake, growth rate, onset of puberty and sexual development of male and female sheep without adverse effects.
    Livestock Science 121 (2009) 1. 01/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: An experiment was carried out to establish whether using a pre-compacting device (expander) changes the contribution of dry matter (DM) and degradative behaviour of grains of barley, maize and milo pre-processed by grinding over the different DM fractions (non-washable (NWF), insoluble washable (ISWF) and soluble washable (SWF) fractions). Samples of the entire concentrate ingredients (WHO ingredients) and their different fractions (NWF, ISWF and SWF) were subjected to three processes (Retsch-milled (R), expander-treated (E) and expander-pelleted (EP) samples) and their fermentation characteristics were evaluated using an in vitro gas production technique. RESULTS: The E process increased the size of the NWF and decreased that of the SWF compared with the R process. The ISWF of R samples was very rich in starch. The maximum fractional rate of substrate degradation and maximum rate of gas production were higher in EP samples than in R samples (P < 0.05). In maize and milo the E and EP processes shifted the pattern of fermentation towards a more glucogenic fermentation, as represented by a lower non-glucogenic/glucogenic ratio (NGR). In all grains the ammonia concentration (NH3-N) and branched chain ratio (BCR) of E and EP samples were significantly (P < 0.05) lower than those of R samples. CONCLUSION: It is concluded that the E and EP processes have the potential to synchronise the fermentation of dietary proteins and carbohydrates and shift the pattern of fermentation towards a more glucogenic fermentation
    Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 89 (2009) 10. 01/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the effect of feeding total mixed rations (TMR) that differ in structural and nonstructural carbohydrates to dairy cows in early and late lactation on short-term feed intake, dry matter intake (DMI), rumen fermentation variables, and milk yield. A 5 x 5 Latin square experiment with 15 dairy cows was repeated during early and late lactation. The 5 treatments were a TMR with (all on dry matter basis) 55% roughage (a 50:50 mixture of corn silage and grass silage) and 45% concentrate (a 50:50 mixture of concentrate rich in structural carbohydrates and concentrate rich in nonstructural carbohydrates; treatment CON), a TMR with the concentrate mixture and 55% grass silage (RGS) or 55% corn silage (RCS), and a TMR with the roughage mixture and 45% of the concentrate rich in structural carbohydrates (CSC) or the concentrate rich in nonstructural carbohydrates (CNS). Meal criteria, determined using the Gaussian-Gaussian-Weibull method per animal per treatment, showed an interaction between lactation stage and treatment. Feed intake behavior variables were therefore calculated with meal criteria per treatment-lactation stage combination. Differences in feed intake behavior were more pronounced between treatments differing in roughage composition than between treatments differing in concentrate composition, probably related to larger differences in chemical composition and particle size between corn silage and grass silage than between the 2 concentrates. The number of meals was similar between treatments, but eating time was greater in RGS (227 min/d) and lesser in RCS (177 min/d) than the other treatments. Intake rate increased when the amount of grass silage decreased, whereas meal duration decreased simultaneously. These effects were in line with a decreased DMI of the RGS diet vs. the other treatments, probably related to the high neutral detergent fiber (NDF) content. However, this effect was not found in CSC, although NDF content of the TMR, fractional clearance rate of NDF, and fractional degradation rate of NDF was similar between CSC and RGS. Rumen fluid pH was lesser, and molar proportions of acetic acid and of propionic acid were lesser and greater, respectively, in RCS compared with all other diets. Milk production did not differ between treatments. There was no effect of type of concentrate on milk composition, but diet RCS resulted in a lesser milk fat content and greater milk protein content than diet RGS. Lactation stage did affect short-term feed intake behavior and DMI, although different grass silages were fed during early and late lactation. The results indicate that short-term feed intake behavior is related to DMI and therefore may be a helpful tool in optimizing DMI and milk production in high-production dairy cows.
    Journal of Dairy Science 01/2009; 91(12):4778-92. · 2.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present experiment was conducted to study the effects of supplementation of Sesbania sesban on the milk yield of ewes and growth rate of their lambs. The experiment was done with animals that had been fed for 16 months on a basal diet of teff straw supplemented with concentrates alone (0% S. sesban) or 95% of supplementary protein provided by S. sesban (accession 15019). Thirty lactating ewes and their single lambs of Ethiopian highland Menz sheep were used in this study. The post partum weight of ewes and birth weight of their lambs ranged between 16¿22 kg and 1.3¿2.4 kg. The ewes continued to be fed a teff straw basal diet and supplemented with two levels of S. sesban (0, and 95% of supplementary protein provided by S. sesban and the rest being provided by concentrates) for 3 months. Three weeks after birth lambs were offered a succulent green grass¿legume mixture ad libitum. Dry matter and organic matter intake of basal feed and total feed, live weight at weaning and post partum daily body weight gain of ewes were not significantly different (P > 0.05) between treatments. The milk yield of ewes was significantly affected (P < 0.05) by dietary treatments. Ewes supplemented with S. sesban showed a 13% increase in milk production over ewes supplemented with concentrates. The peak lactation for ewes supplemented with S. sesban was higher and persisted longer than for ewes supplemented with concentrates. Lambs born from ewes supplemented with S. sesban had a significantly higher pre-weaning growth rate and were heavier at weaning (P < 0.05) than lambs born from ewes supplemented with concentrates. We concluded that supplementation of S. sesban at 30% of the ration (0.98% of their body weight) during lactation improved milk yield of ewes and growth rate of lambs.
    Livestock Science 121 (2009) 1. 01/2009;
  • P.A. Abrahamse, S. Tamminga, J. Dijkstra
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    ABSTRACT: Twenty Holstein cows were split into two equal groups to test the effect of daily move to a previously ungrazed strip after morning milking (MA) or afternoon milking (AA) on herbage intake, grazing behaviour, rumen characteristics and milk production using a randomized block design with three periods of 14 days each. Milking took place at 06.00 and 16.00 h. The chemical composition of grass was similar between treatments, but an interaction between treatment and time of sampling was found in all variables except acid detergent lignin (ADL). The most pronounced differences existed in sugar content. Grass sugar content was greatest following afternoon milking. However, the difference in sugar content in grass was much larger in MA (158 v 114 g/kg dry matter (DM) at 16.00 and 06.00 h, respectively) than in AA (147 v 129 g/kg DM at 16.00 and 06.00 h, respectively). Neutral detergent fibre (NDF) was significantly higher at 06.00 h than at 16.00 h (469 v 425 g/kg DM) in AA, but was equal between morning and afternoon in MA (453 g/kg DM). Herbage intake, determined using the n-alkane technique, did not differ between treatments. Grazing behaviour observed using IGER graze recorders were similar between treatments, except for ruminating time, bite rate and the number of ruminations and boli per period of the day. However, interactions between treatment and time in grazing behaviour variables were found. Grazing time was longer and number of bites was greater following allocation to a new plot (after milking in the morning in MA or milking in the afternoon in AA) when compared to allocation to the same plot after the subsequent milking per treatment (after milking in the afternoon or morning in MA and AA, respectively). In comparison to AA, grazing time in MA was more evenly distributed during the day but lower during the night. The combined effects of differences in grazing behaviour and chemical composition of the grass between treatments in different periods of the day probably caused higher intake of sugars in AA, resulting in a significantly higher non-glucogenic to glucogenic volatile fatty acid ratio (NGR) in the rumen in AA than MA. Milk fat content was lower in MA than AA, but milk production and milk protein and lactose content did not differ. In conclusion, time of allocation to a fresh plot altered the distribution of grazing behaviour variables over the day, and affected NGR and milk fat content, but herbage intake and milk production were not changed
    The Journal of Agricultural Science 01/2009; · 2.88 Impact Factor
  • P.A. Abrahamse, J. Dijkstra, S. Tamminga
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    ABSTRACT: Tijdens weidegang is voldoende voeropname essentieel voor hoge melkproducties. Vaker omweiden zorgt voor een hogere voeropname, maar alleen bij voldoende gewashoogte, zo blijkt uit een promotiestudie van Wageningen Universiteit. Het effect van ’s avonds in plaats van ’s ochtends inscharen is beperkt
    Veeteelt 26 (2009) 15. 01/2009;
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    01/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: Two successive experiments were conducted to investigate the long-term effects of supplementation of Sesbania sesban on reproductive performance of Ethiopian Menz sheep. Forty ewes and 40 rams ranging in weight and age between 16¿20 kg and 14¿15 months respectively were fed a teff straw basal diet and supplemented with two levels of Sesbania (0, and 95% of supplementary protein provided by Sesbania and the rest being provided by concentrates) for 7 months. In experiment 1 (mating period), 4 paired female¿male groups (diet of the male with or without Sesbania, and diet of the female with or without Sesbania) consisting of 20 animals each were formed and assigned for mating. Ewes that were mated and did not return to heat in subsequent cycles during the 70 days mating period continued in experiment 2 receiving similar supplementary diets (concentrate alone or Sesbania) for the study of pregnancy and lambing. During the mating period, males and animals supplemented with Sesbania were superior (P < 0.05) in daily feed nutrients intake, whereas daily body weight gain (ADG) was significantly different (P < 0.05) between treatments but not between sex groups. During pregnancy a significant difference (P < 0.05) was observed only in nitrogen intake, and ADG of ewes did not differ (P > 0.05) between treatments. Supplementation with Sesbania promoted an increase in testicular size by 13%. Except semen concentration, the other seminal characteristics were not significant (P < 0.05) between treatments. The average oestrus cycle length was 19 ± 4.6 days. Mean progesterone profile for cycling ewes on the day of oestrus was 0.4 ± 0.04 and ranged between undetectable levels to 0.75 ng/ml followed by a rise starting on day 4 (1.7 ± 0.16 ng/ml) through day 7 (2.5 ± 0.29 ng/ml) and day 10 (3.6 ± 0.47 ng/ml) to a peak of 3.9 ± 0.45 ng/ml (plateau phase) on day 14. Supplementation with Sesbania improved the proportion of ewes conceived by 17% over supplementation with concentrates. The average birth weight of lambs, and post partum dam weight of ewes was 1.97 kg and 18.6 kg respectively and differed significantly (P < 0.05) between treatments. We concluded that inclusion of Sesbania up to 30% in the diet of sheep as supplement before and during the period of mating and pregnancy improved testicular growth and semen quality in rams or reproductive performance of ewes without showing negative effects
    Livestock Science 121 (2009) 1. 01/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: Twenty Holstein cows were blocked in 2 groups according to milk yield to evaluate the effect of frequency of allocation to new grazing plots on pasture intake, grazing behavior, rumen characteristics, and milk yield. The 2 treatments, daily allocation to 0.125-ha plots (1D) or allocation every 4 d to 0.5-ha plots (4D) of Lolium perenne L., were tested in a randomized block design (2 rotations with 3 or 4 measuring periods of 4 d each) with mixed model analysis accounting for repeated measures. There were no differences in the chemical composition of offered pasture and in pasture dry matter intake (DMI) between 1D and 4D. However, an interaction between treatment and rotation indicated a difference in pasture DMI between treatments during the first rotation (4D, 16.5 vs. 1D, 18.3 kg/d) but not during the second rotation (4D, 15.0 vs. 1D, 14.7 kg/d), possibly a result of a greater pasture mass in the first rotation. Grazing time (average 562 min/d) and ruminating time (average 468 min/d), observed using IGER graze recorders, were similar between treatments, but grazing time increased numerically (549 to 568 min/d), and ruminating time decreased linearly (471 to 450 min/d) within periods in the 4D treatment. Mean rumen pH (6.16 vs. 6.05) and rumen NH(3)-N concentration (113.7 vs. 90.1 mg/L) were higher in 4D than in 1D, and total volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations did not differ. Molar proportions of VFA, except butyrate, differed between treatments, causing the nonglucogenic to glucogenic VFA ratio to be greater in 4D than in 1D. Within days in the 4D treatment, the molar proportion of acetate increased and those of all other VFA decreased linearly. Rumen NH(3)-N concentration within the 4D treatment declined quadratically from 170.3 mg/L on d 1 to 80.7 mg/L on d 4. In contrast to rumen NH(3)-N concentration, milk urea content did not differ between treatments, but decreased quadratically from d 1 to 4 in the 4D treatment (from 26.7 to 20.7 mg/dL). Mean fat- and protein-corrected milk was greater in 1D than in 4D (23.5 vs. 22.8 kg/d), mainly due to a difference in milk yield (24.5 vs. 23.7 kg/d). Fat and protein content were slightly lower in the 1D than in the 4D treatment (3.66 vs. 3.76% and 3.28 vs. 3.34%, respectively). This study confirmed that increasing pasture allocation frequency from once every 4 d to every day improved milk production in grazing dairy cows, especially when offered pasture was high.
    Journal of Dairy Science 06/2008; 91(5):2033-45. · 2.57 Impact Factor
  • S. Tamminga, L.B.J. Sebek
    01/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: An experiment was carried out to establish whether using a pre-compacting device (expander) changes the contribution of dry matter (DM) and degradative behaviour of peas, lupins and faba beans over the different fractions (non-washable fraction, NWF; insoluble washable fraction, ISWF; soluble washable fraction, SWF). Samples of the entire concentrate ingredients (WHO ingredients) and their different fractions (NWF, ISWF and SWF) were subjected to three processes (Retsch milling, R; expander treatment, E; expander-pelleting, EP) and their fermentation characteristics were evaluated using an in vitro gas production technique. RESULTS: In peas and faba beans, both the E and EP processes increased the size of the NWF (P < 0.05) and decreased the size of the SWF compared with the R process. The maximum fractional rate of gas production in the first phase of fermentation was higher in the E and EP samples than in the R samples (P < 0.05). In lupins and faba beans the E and EP processes shifted the pattern of fermentation towards a more glucogenic fermentation, as represented by a lower non-glucogenic to glucogenic ratio (NGR). Ammonia production (NH3-N) in the E and EP samples was significantly (P < 0.05) lower than that in the R samples.CONCLUSION: It is concluded that the E and EP processes provide a certain level of protection against ruminal breakdown to dietary protein and shift the pattern of fermentation towards a more glucogenic fermentation. Copyright © 2008 Society of Chemical Industry
    Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 88 (2008) 11. 01/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: The present study gives a critique of the mechanisms involved with the formation of volatile fatty acid (VFA) formed in the lumen of the reticulo-rumen, the absorption of VFA across the reticulo-rumen wall, and the intra-epithelial metabolism of VFA by reticulo-rumen epithelium. In contrast to the empirical treatment of these aspects in previous rumen modelling studies, a mechanistic model was developed which represents each of these aspects separately. Because tissues of the reticulo-rumen may strongly adapt to changing nutritional conditions, this adaptive response was included in the model. The model enabled an evaluation of the implications of VFA yield on the development of the rumen wall, on the transport of VFA, on the extent of intra-epithelial metabolism of VFA, and on the consequences for the supply of VFA to the ruminant. The current modelling effort allowed the integration of existing knowledge on each of these aspects and the model reproduced some essential characteristics of experimental observations on VFA absorption and metabolism. Although further development is still needed, the model appears helpful to distinguish elements that require specific consideration when evaluating rates of net portal appearance of VFA, or when testing hypothesis on the interaction between formation, absorption and intra-epithelial metabolism of VFA under various experimental conditions
    Animal Feed Science and Technology 143 (2008) 1-4. 01/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: Daily herbage intake depends on factors governing the initiation and cessation of successive grazing bouts. Ruminal fill is one such factor, regulating grazing bout-eating behavior. Under grazing conditions, nutrient supply varies among grazing bouts, not only in amount, but also in balance. Also, there is evidence suggesting differential energy expenditures in herbage harvesting and ingestive mastication among grazing bouts. The animal internal state plays an important role in shaping grazing pattern, although demands of ruminal microflora may be at times more important. It may well be that perception of ruminal conditions most likely dominates the short-term intake rate during a complete grazing bout, whereas on a larger spatiotemporal scale, the animal may operate within a framework of daily level of energy demand. Simultaneously, cattle might be dealing with pasture progressive defoliation as the grazing event progresses. This leads to selective behaviors and herbage intake rate reductions. From this work emerges that integrating different ingestive and digestive behaviors across foraging spatio-temporal scales would provide greater comprehension of factors driving the diurnal grazing patterns of cattle, helping in the design of better grazing methods.
    Professional Animal Scientist. 01/2008; 24:308-318.
  • 01/2008;

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Institutions

  • 1990–2011
    • Wageningen University
      • • Department of Animal Nutrition
      • • Department of Adaptation Physiology
      • • Division of Division of Dierlijkeproductie systemen
      Wageningen, Provincie Gelderland, Netherlands
  • 2007
    • Lorestan University
      Khur Ramābād, Lorestān, Iran
  • 2006
    • Universidade Federal de Lavras (UFLA)
      • Departamento de Medicina Veterinária
      Lavras, Estado de Minas Gerais, Brazil
  • 2005
    • Ghent University
      • Department of Plant Production
      Gent, VLG, Belgium
  • 2001
    • Addis Ababa University
      • School of Veterinary Medicine
      Addis Ababa, Adis Abeba Astedader, Ethiopia
  • 2000
    • Provimi BV
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 1999
    • University of Nairobi
      • Department of Animal Production
      Nairobi, Nairobi Province, Kenya
  • 1997–1999
    • University of Alberta
      • Department of Agricultural, Food, and Nutritional Science
      Edmonton, Alberta, Canada