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Publications (3)19.68 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: This study focused on dietary glycemic index because insulin resistance can be important in the pathogenesis of fat deposition in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We evaluated differences in past dietary glycemic intake between men with HIV who developed fat deposition and those who did not. This was a nested case-control study consisting of 37 cases and 37 controls from the Nutrition for Healthy Living cohort. Food records from 6 to 24 months prior to development of fat deposition in cases were analyzed and compared with controls. Cases were defined as men with a waist-to-hip ratio >0.95 and body mass index (calculated as kg/m(2)) between 23 and 26. Controls were matched by age, race, body mass index, highly active antiretroviral therapy use, and CD4 count. Food records were analyzed using t tests for normally distributed nutrients and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests for nutrients with skewed distributions. Glycemic index was calculated for each meal and day. There was no significant difference in glycemic index for meals and day between participants with or without fat deposition. Both groups had a moderate dietary glycemic index intake. This study showed no association between dietary glycemic index and development of fat deposition in HIV. Instead, results of this study depict the potential benefits associated with eating high-quality diets, primarily adequate fiber and protein intake. Diet can be important in preventing development of fat deposition in patients with HIV.
    Journal of the American Dietetic Association 06/2006; 106(5):728-32. · 3.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lipodystrophy has been described with increasing frequency in patients infected with HIV. This study focused on the identification of dietary components that may predispose HIV-positive patients to the development of fat deposition. We evaluated differences in past dietary intake between men with HIV who developed fat deposition and those who did not. This nested case-control study consisted of 47 cases and 47 controls from the Nutrition for Healthy Living cohort. Food records from 6 to 24 mo before development of fat deposition in cases were analyzed and compared with food records from controls by using t tests for normally distributed nutrients and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests for nutrients with skewed distributions. HIV-positive patients without fat deposition had greater overall energy intakes (kcal/kg; P = 0.03) and greater intakes of total protein (P = 0.01), total dietary fiber (P = 0.01), soluble dietary fiber (P = 0.01), insoluble dietary fiber (P = 0.03), and pectin (P = 0.02) than did HIV-positive patients with fat deposition. Those without fat deposition also tended to currently perform more resistance training (P = 0.05) and to not be current smokers (P = 0.05). Our results indicate that an overall high-quality diet, rich in fiber and adequate in energy and protein, may be beneficial in preventing the development of fat deposition in persons infected with HIV. The results of this study further emphasize that a healthy lifestyle, including exercise and avoidance of unhealthy behaviors such as smoking, may also be similarly beneficial.
    American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 11/2003; 78(4):790-5. · 6.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The dietary intake of micronutrients and serum micronutrient status have been topics of concern in relation to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) progression. Most data, however, were collected prior to the introduction of protease inhibitors (PIs). We analyzed dietary intake and serum values of vitamin B(12), including the effect of PIs, in a cohort of persons with HIV infection. During intervals with no PI use, each 1 microg/day increase in B(12) intake was associated with a 1.06 pg/mL increase in serum B(12) levels. However, during intervals with PI use, each 1 microg/day increase in intake was associated with only a 0.12 increase in serum B(12) levels. Adequate serum B(12) levels (>350 pg/mL) cannot be assumed even in the presence of PIs, and dietary supplementation may not be adequate to significantly increase serum B(12) levels. Serum B(12) levels should be determined yearly in persons with HIV infection, regardless of whether they are receiving PI treatment.
    Clinical Infectious Diseases 01/2003; 37 Suppl 2:S124-31. · 9.37 Impact Factor