G Schroth

Memorial Hermann Hospital, Houston, Texas, United States

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Publications (30)174.29 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To investigate the relative importance of balloon to artery ratio (BAR) and poststent inflation pressure (IP), we retrospectively analyzed the IVUS (intravascular ultrasound) data available for patients (n = 30) who underwent coronary stent implantations (n = 31) between May 1993 and April 1996 under various stent deployment strategies. Choice for sizing of the postdilatation balloon varied widely with BAR ranging from 0.7.5 to 1.34 (mean = 1.07 ± 0.14). IP also varied profoundly from 4 to 22 atm (mean = 14.7 ± 3.7 atms). Although there was no uncovered dissection or subintimal hemorrhage by IVUS, the adequacy of the stent deployment as assessed by relative stent expansion (RSE) varied significantly from 44.0% (very poor deployment) to 141.7% (overstretching of the arterial segment). Strikingly, BAR, not IP, correlated significantly with RSE (correlation coefficient [CC] of BAR =0.77, P <0.0001; CC of IP =0.13, P > 0.5; stepwise linear regression analysis). No stent postdilated by a balloon with a BAR of ≤ 1.0 achieved a RSE of 100%, while BARS ≤ 1.2 uniformly resulted in RSEs ≤ 100%. In contrast, despite postdilation IP of ≤ 15 atm, only 6 (33.3%) of 18 stem achieved RSE > 100%. Moreover, high RSEs were obtained by IP as low as 8 atms. Thus, BAR was much more strongly correlated with RSE, an index of optimal stent deployment, while IP was not correlated with RSE. These data suggest that BAR may be more important than IP for maximal stent implantation in the majority of patients. However, further larger scale, prospective studies are required to determine the importance of BAR versus IP to achieve optimal stent deployment.
    Journal of Interventional Cardiology 06/2007; 13(4):223 - 229. · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in acute myocardial infarction (MI) has been associated with a high incidence of slow-, no-reflow. The slow-, no-reflow phenomenon is known to complicate both thrombolytic therapy and PCI. Removing intracoronary thrombus before PCI in acute MI patients may reduce the incidence of slow-, no-reflow phenomena. We studied the procedural outcome of 21 patients who underwent rheolytic thrombectomy using Possis rheolytic thrombectomy catheter in the setting of acute MI as compared to twenty-eight patients who underwent PCI in the setting of acute MI using other modalities (PTCA with or without stenting) without thrombectomy. The study included 49 consecutive patients with 21 patients in the rheolytic thrombectomy group, and 28 patients in the no-rheolytic thrombectomy group. There was no significant difference between the two groups as regards to gender, age, and prevalence of coronary artery risk factors. The left ventricular ejection fraction was 44.7 12 in the rheolytic thrombectomy group, and 37.6 10.8 in the no-rheolytic thrombectomy group (p = 0.08). Thirty eight percent of the patients in the rheolytic thrombectomy group experienced slow flow, no-reflow, while 28.6% of the patients in the no-rheolytic thrombectomy group experienced slow flow, no-reflow (p = 0.5). In this matched series of patients with acute MI undergoing PCI, rheolytic thrombectomy by the Possis rheolytic thrombectomy catheter device does not appear to reduce the risk of slow flow, no-reflow, or in-hospital death, compared to standard PTCA and stenting of the infarct-related artery.
    International Journal of Angiology 07/2003; 12(3):183-187.
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    ABSTRACT: Elderly patients are increasingly referred to percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs). Recent reports suggest complications rates are declining in the elderly. We sought to determine whether procedural and in-hospital outcomes are different in patients aged ≥ 75 years undergoing nonemergent PCI as compared to patients age < 75 years. The outcome of 266 consecutive patients age ≥ 75 years undergoing nonemergent PCI was compared to that of 1,681 consecutive patients age < 75 years. Compared with younger patients, greater proportions of elderly patients were women and had a history of hypertension, peripheral vascular disease, and cerebral vascular events. Elderly patients had more extensive coronary involvement. Procedural success was similar in both groups (94%). The in-hospital cardiac death rate was significantly higher in the elderly patients (2.3% vs. 0.7%; P = 0.03). Aged patients also had a significantly higher incidence of vascular and bleeding complications. Blood transfusion was required more often in the elderly group (4.5% vs. 2.6%; P = 0.07). The hospitalization length was significantly higher in the elderly group (4.1 ± 6.0 vs. 2.5 ± 4.3 day; P = 0.0004). By multivariate logistic regression (adjusted for baseline clinical and angiographic variables), age ≥ 75 years was found to be an independent predictor of in-hospital cardiac death (odds ratio = 3.9; 95% CI = 1.3–11.5; P = 0.015). Although PCI is technically successful in patients aged ≥ 75 years; it is associated with more acute cardiac and vascular complications and higher in-hospital cardiac mortality. Cathet Cardiovasc Intervent 2003;59:195–199. © 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions 05/2003; 59(2):195 - 199. · 2.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The most consistent procedural predictor of vascular access site complications thus far has been the intensity and duration of anticoagulant therapy during and after percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). Several devices have been developed to aid in the closure of the femoral arteriotomy. This report describes the clinical outcome of unsuccessful deployment of femoral closure devices in a cohort of 285 consecutive patients who underwent PCI and were treated with platelet glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa inhibitors. Manual femoral artery compression was used in 123 patients, Perclose in 123 patients, and AngioSeal in 39 patients. Successful homeostasis was achieved in 98.4% of patients who received manual compression, in 91.9% of the Perclose-sealed arteriotomy, and in 84.6% of patients who received the AngioSeal closure device (P = 0.004). The incidence of vascular complications after successful deployment was 9%. Patients not achieving hemostasis with closure device or 1 degrees manual compression developed complications in the majority of cases (> 80%; P < 0.05). By multivariate analysis (with adjustment for baseline differences), the use of AngioSeal closure device was found to be an independent risk factors leading to primary deployment failure and all access site complications (OR 2.97; 95% CI 1.5-6.0; P = 0.006). In summary, failed hemostasis by artery closure devices in patients undergoing PCI who are treated with GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors is associated with significant vascular complications. AngioSeal may be associated with a higher failure rate, while manual compression and Perclose seem to be more effective with a lower complication rate.
    Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions 01/2003; 58(1):1-5. · 2.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abciximab therapy improves clinical outcomes after percutaneous interventions for de novo coronary artery disease. We sought to determine whether clinical outcomes after percutaneous intervention for in-stent restenosis are affected by abciximab administration. Between January 1996 and July 1999, 322 consecutive patients underwent percutaneous intervention for in-stent restenosis; 157 patients received abciximab and 165 patients were treated without abciximab based on operator discretion. Baseline clinical and angiographic variables and type of percutaneous intervention were recorded. Follow-up information was obtained and clinical endpoints were recorded. A multivariate analysis was performed to determine the independent variables associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Baseline clinical and angiographic variables were similar in both groups. Patients who received abciximab were more likely to be treated with rotational atherectomy and less likely to have only balloon angioplasty or repeat stenting. Mean follow-up duration was 19 +/- 12 months. There were no significant differences in the incidence of angina/myocardial infarction (29% vs. 30%; P = 0.9), target vessel revascularization (18% vs. 21%; P = 0.5), death (8% vs. 7%; P = 0.4), or major adverse cardiovascular events (38% vs. 39%; P = 0.9) in both groups. Abciximab administration was not an independent variable associated with adverse outcomes. In this observational study, clinical outcomes after percutaneous intervention for in-stent restenosis did not seem to be affected by abciximab administration. Randomized trials are needed to identify the role of platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors in the management of in-stent restenosis.
    Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions 07/2002; 56(2):184-7. · 2.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Slow or no-reflow phenomenon (SNR) complicates 10%-15% of cases of percutaneous intervention (PCI) in aortocoronary saphenous vein grafts (SVG). At present, there are no uniform, effective strategies to predict or prevent this common and potentially serious complication. The purpose of our study was to characterize variables correlated with the risk of SNR in SVG PCI in the era of stenting and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor inhibitors. We identified 2,898 consecutive patients who had PCI, of whom 163 underwent PCI of at least one SVG. The clinical and angiographic characteristics of patients who developed SNR (SNR group) were compared with those who did not (no-SNR group). A total of 23 patients experienced SNR and 140 did not. Using a stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis, four independent predictors for SNR were detected: probable thrombus (OR 6.9; 95% CI, 2.1-23.9; P = 0.001), acute coronary syndromes (OR 6.4; 95% CI, 2.0-25.3; P = 0.003), degenerated vein graft (OR 5.2; 95% CI, 1.7-16.6; P = 0.003), and ulcer (OR 3.4; 95% CI, 0.99-11.6; P = 0.04). The risk of developing SNR could be estimated according to the number of predictors found: low-grade risk (1%-10%) if < or = one variable was present, moderate risk (20%-40%) if two variables were present, and high risk (60%-90%) if three or more variables were present. We identified and quantified current risk factors for SNR and concluded that the risk of developing SNR during PCI in SVG can be predicted by simple clinical and angiographic variables obtained before PCI. This information may be useful when the risk of PCI has to be balanced against alternative strategies such as medical therapy or redo-bypass surgery or in the selection of those patients that will most benefit from the use of protection devices during PCI.
    Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions 12/2001; 54(3):318-24. · 2.51 Impact Factor
  • The American Journal of Cardiology 11/2001; 88(8):884-6, A6. · 3.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The histological appearance of stenosis in de novo saphenous venous grafts (DNSVG) consists of diffuse atherosclerosis that contains blood elements, necrotic debris and limited fibrocollagenous tissue. The friable nature of these lesions complicates percutaneous intervention (PCI) procedures. On the other hand, in-stent restenosis (ISR) of SVG is due primarily to atherosclerotic plaque or fibromuscular hyperplasia, with thrombus formation playing a secondary role. The purpose of this study is to compare the results of PCI in these two types of SVG lesions. We reviewed our institutional interventional database from March 1996 through February 2000 and identified all consecutive patients who underwent PCI of at least one SVG. One hundred and ten patients were identified: 89 undergoing DNSVG intervention and 21 patients with ISR lesions. Acute coronary syndromes, degenerated and thrombus-containing lesions were more common in the DNSVG group. "Slow-, no-reflow" complicated 20% of the DNSVG lesions compared to none of the ISR lesions (p = 0.02). Post-procedural myocardial infarction was higher in the DNSVG group (13.5% versus 0%; p = 0.1) and correlated significantly with the occurrence of "slow-, no-reflow" (r = 0.43; p = 0.0001). Utilizing statistical modeling to adjust for baseline differences between the groups, ISR lesions were associated with a low risk of procedural complications (r = 0.22; p = 0.03). This study demonstrates that in this relatively high-risk population, PCI is safer in ISR lesions than in de novo SVG lesions.
    The Journal of invasive cardiology 07/2001; 13(6):446-50. · 1.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We examined long-term outcomes of patients with in-stent restenosis (ISR) who underwent different percutaneous interventions at the discretion of individual operators: balloon angioplasty (BA), repeat stent or rotational atherectomy (RA). We also examined long-term outcomes of patients with ISR who underwent coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG). In-stent restenosis remains a challenging problem, and its optimal management is still unknown. Symptomatic patients (n = 510) with ISR were identified using cardiac catheterization laboratory data. Management for ISR included BA (169 patients), repeat stenting (117 patients), RA (107 patients) or CABG (117 patients). Clinical outcome events of interest included death, myocardial infarction, target vessel revascularization (TVR) and a combined end point of these major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). Mean follow-up was 19+/-12 months (range = 6 to 61 months). Patients with ISR treated with repeat stent had significantly larger average post-procedure minimal lumen diameter compared with BA or RA (3.3+/-0.4 mm vs. 3.0+/-0.4 vs. 2.9+/-0.5, respectively, p < 0.05). Incidence of TVR and MACE were similar in the BA, stent and RA groups (39%, 40%, 33% for TVR and 43%, 40%, 33% for MACE, p = NS). Patients with diabetes who underwent RA had similar outcomes as patients without diabetes, while patients with diabetes who underwent BA or stent had worse outcomes than patients without diabetes. Patients who underwent CABG for ISR, mainly because of the presence of multivessel disease, had significantly better outcomes than any percutaneous treatment (8% for TVR and 23% for MACE). In this large cohort of patients with ISR and in the subset of patients without diabetes, long-term outcomes were similar in the BA, repeat stent and RA groups. Tissue debulking with RA yielded better results only in diabetic patients. Bypass surgery for patients with multivessel disease and ISR provided the best outcomes.
    Journal of the American College of Cardiology 06/2001; 37(7):1877-82. · 14.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Slow or no reflow (SNR) complicates 10-15% of cases of percutaneous intervention (PI) in saphenous vein bypass graft (SVG). To date there have been limited options for the prevention and treatment of this common and potentially serious complication. We evaluated the procedural outcome of 143 consecutive SVG interventions. We compared patients who received pre-intervention intra-graft adenosine boluses with those who did not. In addition we examined the efficacy of adenosine boluses to reverse slow-no reflow events. Angiograms were reviewed and flow graded (TIMI grade) by film readers blinded to the use of any intraprocedural drug or clinical history. Seventy patients received intragraft adenosine boluses before percutaneous intervention (APPI), 73 received no preintervention adenosine (NoAPPI). There were no significant angiographic differences between the two groups at baseline. A total of 20 patients experienced SNR. The incidence of SNR was similar in the two groups (APPI = 14.2% vs. NoAPPI = 13.6%, P = 0.9). SNR was treated with repeated, rapid boluses (24 microg each) of intra-graft adenosine. Reversal of SNR was observed in 10 of 11 patients (91%) who received high doses of adenosine (>/=5 boluses, mean 7.7 +/- 2.6) and in 3 of 9 (33%) of those who received low doses (<5 boluses, mean 1.5 +/- 1.2). Final TIMI flow was significantly better in the high dose than in the low dose group (final TIMI 2.7 +/- 0.6 vs. 2 +/- 0.8, P = 0.04). No significant untoward complications were observed during adenosine infusion. These findings suggest that SNR after PI in SVG is not prevented by pre-intervention adenosine, but it can be safely and effectively reversed by delivery of multiple, rapid and repeated boluses of 24 microg of intra-graft adenosine.
    Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions 12/2000; 51(4):394-9. · 2.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Acute reintervention was performed in 26 of 1,620 patients after coronary stenting (1.6%). Half of the patients had stent thrombosis and the other half residual anatomic problems. The mean time for reintervention was shorter in patients with stent thrombosis. All patients with stent thrombosis had a sudden recurrence of chest pain. Electrocardiographic changes were more common with stent thrombosis. Composite end point occurred in 10 patients (77%) with stent thrombosis versus 5 (39%) in the other group (p = 0.04).
    The American Journal of Cardiology 12/2000; 86(9):1018-21, A10. · 3.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Percutaneous intervention in acute myocardial infarction has been associated with a high incidence of "no reflow," ranging from 11% to 30%, with an increased risk of complications. The role of intracoronary adenosine for the prevention of this phenomenon has not been evaluated fully. We studied the procedural outcomes of 79 patients who underwent percutaneous intervention in the context of acute myocardial infarction. Twenty-eight patients received no intracoronary adenosine, and 51 received intracoronary adenosine boluses (24-48 microg before and after each balloon inflation). Eight patients who were not given adenosine experienced no reflow (28.6%) and higher rates of in-hospital death, while only three of 51 patients (5.9%; P = 0.014) in the adenosine group experienced no reflow. No untoward complications were noted during adenosine infusion. Intracoronary adenosine bolus administration during percutaneous intervention in the context of acute myocardial infarction is easy and safe and may significantly lessen the incidence of no reflow, which may improve the outcome of this procedure.
    Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions 10/2000; 51(1):27-31; discussion 32. · 2.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Acute and subacute stent thromboses (ASST) are the major thrombotic complications of coronary stenting. The time course of ASST seems to be related to the type of antithrombotic therapy (four days in patients treated with aspirin and coumadin compared to 12 hours with the use of aspirin and ticlopidine). In this report, we compared the timing of ASST in patients treated with aspirin, ticlopidine/clopidogrel, heparin and tirofiban with that in patients treated with the same drugs but without tirofiban. Retrospective analysis of the Hermann intervention database between January 1997 and October 1999 was performed. We identified 13 patients who required reintervention in the first week after a successful coronary stenting ( 1 stent). Four patients were treated with tirofiban (Group 1) and 9 were not (Group 2). The median time from stent deployment to ASST was 7 hours (interquartile range, 2.5Eth 33 hours) in group 2 compared to 84.5 hours (interquartile range, 56Eth 124.5 hours) in group 1. The mean time from stent deployment to ASST was 90.3 +/- 43.1 hours in group 1 versus 12.8 +/- 15.3 hours in group 2 (p = 0.0005). All episodes of ASST occurred 3 days in patients treated with tirofiban, whereas they occurred in the first 2 days in all patients not treated with tirofiban. Prophylactic tirofiban treatment delays the time to stent thrombosis after successful coronary artery stent implantation for more than two days. Patients at high risk for stent thrombosis treated with short-acting glycoprotein IIb/IIIa platelet receptor inhibitors may warrant close follow-up during the first week after stenting.
    The Journal of invasive cardiology 10/2000; 12(9):460-3. · 1.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Percutaneous intervention in acute myocardial infarction has been associated with a high incidence of “no reflow,” ranging from 11% to 30%, with an increased risk of complications. The role of intracoronary adenosine for the prevention of this phenomenon has not been evaluated fully. We studied the procedural outcomes of 79 patients who underwent percutaneous intervention in the context of acute myocardial infarction. Twenty-eight patients received no intracoronary adenosine, and 51 received intracoronary adenosine boluses (24–48 μg before and after each balloon inflation). Eight patients who were not given adenosine experienced no reflow (28.6%) and higher rates of in-hospital death, while only three of 51 patients (5.9%; P =0.014) in the adenosine group experienced no reflow. No untoward complications were noted during adenosine infusion. Intracoronary adenosine bolus administration during percutaneous intervention in the context of acute myocardial infarction is easy and safe and may significantly lessen the incidence of no reflow, which may improve the outcome of this procedure. Cathet. Cardiovasc. Intervent. 51:27–31, 2000. © 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions 08/2000; 51(1):27 - 31. · 2.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Rotational atherectomy (RA) of complex, calcified lesions has been associated with a high incidence of no reflow ranging from 6%-15% and concomitant myocardial necrosis with adverse prognostic implications. There are no uniform strategies for preventing this complication. The role of intracoronary adenosine for the prevention of this phenomenon during RA has not been fully evaluated. We studied the procedural outcome of 122 patients who underwent RA of complex native coronary artery lesions. Fifty-two patients received no adenosine but a variety of other agents. Seventy patients received intracoronary adenosine boluses (24 to 48 microgram prior to and after each RA run). There was no difference in the type of lesion studied, run time, or Burr to artery ratio (0.6-0.7) between the two groups. Six patients without adenosine experienced no reflow (11.6%), with resultant infarction in the target artery territory, while only 1 of 70 patients (1.4%, P - 0.023) in the adenosine group experienced no reflow. No untoward complications were observed during adenosine infusion. Intracoronary adenosine bolus administered during rotational atherectomy is easy, safe, and may significantly reduce the incidence of no reflow, which may improve the 30-day outcome of this procedure.
    Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions 12/1999; 48(3):275-8. · 2.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) in women after menopause is associated with prevention of clinical coronary artery disease. However, few studies have investigated possible benefits from ERT in postmenopausal women undergoing treatment for established coronary disease. We therefore retrospectively reviewed the clinical outcomes of 428 postmenopausal women undergoing percutaneous transluminal coronary balloon angioplasty (PTCA) to test the hypothesis that ERT has a beneficial effect in this setting. The women were divided into 2 groups based on ERT status at the time of the procedure. Estrogen users were younger (60 +/- 10 vs 68 +/- 9 years, p <0.001), more commonly had family histories of coronary heart disease (54% vs 41%, p = 0.04), had less incidence of hypertension (63% vs 76%, p = 0.02), and had slightly fewer diseased vessels per patient (1.3 +/- 0.5 vs 1.5 +/- 0.7, p = 0.03) compared with nonusers. No in-hospital deaths occurred in estrogen users compared with 5% hospital mortality in nonusers (p = 0.01). The combined outcome of death or myocardial infarction (MI) also was lower in estrogen users (4% vs 12%, p = 0.04). Of 348 women discharged after successful PTCA, 336 (97%) were able to be contacted at an average follow-up interval of 22 +/- 17 months (range 5 to 82). Estrogen users had superior event-free survival both for death as well as for death or nonfatal MI. Repeat revascularizations were similar in both groups (32% vs 24%, p = 0.15). In a Cox proportional-hazards model, nonusers had 4 times the likelihood of death after angioplasty compared with estrogen users (OR = 4.025, 95% CI = 1.3 to 13.4, p = 0.02). We conclude that estrogen replacement may offer protection against clinical coronary events in postmenopausal women who already have established coronary disease and are undergoing balloon angioplasty. The benefit was independent of age, smoking, presence of diabetes mellitus, or the number of diseased coronary vessels. However, it did not include a reduction in repeat revascularization procedures, suggesting no reduction in restenosis.
    The American Journal of Cardiology 09/1998; 82(4):409-13. · 3.21 Impact Factor
  • Catheterization and Cardiovascular Diagnosis 02/1998; 43(1):108-10.
  • Catheterization and Cardiovascular Diagnosis 01/1998; 44(3):367-367.
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    ABSTRACT: This study sought to determine whether infrapopliteal transcatheter interventions can salvage ischemic limbs in diabetic patients referred for below the knee amputation at our institution. The value of transcatheter interventions in diabetic crural arteries is controversial. Tissue oxygen partial pressure (TCO2) levels < 40 mm Hg predict poor wound healing. Percutaneous interventions were performed in 29 consecutive diabetic patients in need of limb salvage. Technical success was defined as < 20% residual vessel stenosis. Clinical success was defined as the avoidance of amputation and achievement of wound healing. At hospital discharge, patients were treated with Coumadin and aspirin. Ankle-brachial index (ABI) and TCO2 measurements were obtained before and after the intervention. After 12-month follow-up, six patients had presistent wounds, whereas 23 experienced wound healing. Forty of the 50 infrapopliteal arteries successfully dilated were occluded, with a mean (+/-SD) lesion length of 18.0 +/- 3.5 cm. After the procedure, TCO2 improved from 27.82 +/- 9.97 mm Hg (95% confidence interval [CI] 23.95 to 31.69) to 54.5 +/- 14.73 mm Hg (95% CI 48.79 to 60.21, p < 0.0001), whereas the ABI did not (p > 0.2). TCO2 predicted procedural and clinical success (p < 0.0182). Infrapopliteal transcatheter interventions in diabetic patients may salvage the majority of limbs doomed to amputation. Although TCO2 measurements are valuable in predicting wound healing and success after interventions, ABI measurements are not.
    Journal of the American College of Cardiology 09/1997; 30(3):664-9. · 14.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to identify qualitative or quantitative variables present on angioscopy, intravascular ultrasound imaging or quantitative coronary arteriography that were associated with adverse clinical outcome after coronary intervention in high risk patients. Patients with acute coronary syndromes and complex lesion morphology on angiography are at increased risk for acute complications after coronary angioplasty. Newer devices that primarily remove atheroma have not improved outcome over that of balloon angioplasty. Intravascular imaging can accurately identify intraluminal and intramural histopathologic features not adequately visualized during coronary arteriography and may provide mechanistic insight into the pathogenesis of abrupt closure and restenosis. Sixty high risk patients with unstable coronary syndromes and complex lesions on angiography underwent angioscopy (n = 40) and intravascular ultrasound imaging (n = 46) during interventional procedures. In 26 patients, both angioscopy and intravascular ultrasound were performed in the same lesion. All patients underwent off-line quantitative coronary arteriography. Coronary interventions included balloon (n = 21) and excimer laser (n = 4) angioplasty, directional (n = 19) and rotational (n = 6) atherectomy and stent implantation (n = 11). Patients were followed up for 1 year for objective evidence for recurrent ischemia. Patients whose clinical presentation included rest angina or acute myocardial infarction or who received thrombolytic therapy within 24 h of procedure were significantly more likely to experience recurrent ischemia after intervention. Plaque rupture or thrombus on preprocedure angioscopy or angioscopic thrombus after intervention were also significantly associated with adverse outcome. Qualitative or quantitative variables on angiography, intravascular ultrasound or off-line quantitative arteriography were not associated with recurrent ischemia on univariate analysis. Multivariate predictors of recurrent ischemia were plaque rupture on preprocedure angioscopy (p < 0.05, odds ratio [OR] 10.15) and angioscopic thrombus after intervention (p < 0.05, OR 7.26). Angioscopic plaque rupture and thrombus were independently associated with adverse outcome in patients with complex lesions after interventional procedures. These features were not identified by either angiography or intravascular ultrasound.
    Journal of the American College of Cardiology 08/1996; 28(1):97-105. · 14.09 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

350 Citations
174.29 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1996–2007
    • Memorial Hermann Hospital
      Houston, Texas, United States
  • 1996–2003
    • University of Texas Medical School
      • Department of Internal Medicine
      Houston, Texas, United States
  • 1995–1998
    • University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston
      • Department of Internal Medicine
      Houston, Texas, United States