L Campoy

University College Dublin, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland

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Publications (4)5.15 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: : A domestic-longhair cat presented due to lethargy, dyspnoea and hypersalivation. Radiographic examination revealed a bilateral pleural effusion, which was diagnosed as pyothorax based on cytological examination. Ultrasonographic examination revealed extensive loculations within the thoracic cavity. Exploratory sternotomy, under general anaesthesia, allowed the removal of approximately 100 ml of purulent fluid and debridement of a partially walled-off abscess and necrotic material from the pleural cavity. Postoperative positive-pressure ventilation was required due to severe respiratory depression. Intensive postoperative care, including intensive continuous monitoring, thoracostomy tube drainage and lavage of the pleural cavity and oesophagostomy tube feeding, was performed. Complete resolution of clinical signs had occurred by 15 days postoperatively. Clinical or radiographic abnormalities were not detected at a follow-up examination one year after surgery.
    Irish Veterinary Journal 04/2005; 58(4):211-5. DOI:10.1186/2046-0481-58-4-211 · 1.71 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The clinical, radiographic, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), surgical and pathological findings related to an osteochondral lesion of the sacrum in a mastiff dog are described. The dog showed chronic signs of pain in its pelvic limbs. Radiography revealed a triangular mineralised opacity at the craniodorsal aspect of the sacrum consistent with sacral osteochondrosis. A T2-weighted spin-echo MRI revealed dorsal and lateral compression of the cauda equina. The osteochondral fragment was removed via a dorsal laminectomy, and the clinical signs resolved. Histological abnormalities in the fragment were consistent with a diagnosis of osteochondrosis.
    The Veterinary record 08/2004; 155(3):83-6. DOI:10.1136/vr.155.3.83 · 1.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Endotracheal tubes manufactured from red rubber and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) were compared, using radiographic techniques, in dog cadavers, under in vitro conditions and in anaesthetised dogs (in vivo study). All endotracheal tubes were radiographed in 'neutral' and flexed positions and the percentage reduction in the ventrodorsal radiographical diameter of the tube was calculated. The red rubber tubes kinked completely in 40 per cent of the cadavers, 75 per cent of the in vitro study and 40 per cent of anaesthetised dogs. The PVC tubes kinked completely in only one case (in vivo study). However, these tubes had a mean reduction in diameter of 15 per cent in the dog cadaver study, 19 per cent in the in vitro study and 26 per cent in the in vivo study. During procedures in which the trachea is intubated and the atlanto-occipital joint of the patient must be flexed, PVC endotracheal tubes may be less prone to kinking than red rubber tubes.
    Journal of Small Animal Practice 02/2003; 44(1):3-7. · 0.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Endotracheal tubes manufactured from red rubber and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) were compared, using radiographic techniques, in dog cadavers, under in vitro conditions and in anaesthetised dogs (in vivo study). All endotracheal tubes were radiographed in‘neutral’and flexed positions and the percentage reduction in the ventrodorsal radiographical diameter of the tube was calculated. The red rubber tubes kinked completely in 40 per cent of the cadavers, 75 per cent of the in vitro study and 40 per cent of anaesthetised dogs. The PVC tubes kinked completely in only one case (in vivo study). However, these tubes had a mean reduction in diameter of 15 per cent in the dog cadaver study, 19 per cent in the in vitro study and 26 per cent in the in vivo study. During procedures in which the trachea is intubated and the atlanto-occipital joint of the patient must be flexed, PVC endotracheal tubes may be less prone to kinking than red rubber tubes.
    Journal of Small Animal Practice 12/2002; 44(1):3 - 7. DOI:10.1111/j.1748-5827.2003.tb00095.x · 0.91 Impact Factor