Gus Gill

Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, Los Angeles, California, United States

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Publications (2)3.59 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the study was twofold: 1) to search for potential biomarkers that were overexpressed in cell lines that could represent both a clinical premalignant (immortalized) and a malignant state, and 2) to attempt to correlate metallothionein gene expression with clinical outcome in laryngeal carcinoma. A series of in vitro experiments were used to unearth differentially expressed genes among normal, immortalized and tumorigenic cell lines. Secondarily, a retrospective analysis was undertaken. Differential display analysis was conducted to identify differentially expressed genes between human papillomavirus-infected immortalized HOK16B and benzo[ ]pyrene-derived tumorigenic cell line, HOK16B-BaP-T. The cell-specific expressions were examined by Northern blot analysis and compared with other known immortalized and cancer cell lines. Immunohistochemical staining was also conducted to localize metallothionein (MT I/II) protein expression among the different cell lines studied. A retrospective analysis of laryngeal specimens from archival tissues of 29 cancer patients who underwent primary surgical resection was also undertaken after immunohistochemical staining. Twenty-one differentially expressed complementary cDNA clones, both novel and known, were identified using the differential display analysis. Northern blot analysis confirmed that clone 6 hybridized to a 1.6-kb RNA in HOK16B-Bap-T cell line. Clone 4 showed decreased expression in immortalized and cancer cell compared with NHOK. MT I/II transcript was observed in HOK16B, which was further elevated in HOK16B-Bap-T. Retrospective analysis showed that high immunoreactivity to MT I/II in surgically resected laryngeal cancer specimen correlated with increased frequency of recurrence within 2 years of surgery. These findings suggest that clone 4 may potentially function as a tumor suppressor gene, which may be significant in tumor progression and invasion. Clone 6 may participate in viral-mediated oncogenic transformation of normal cells. Clone 6 may also have potential as a tumor maker differentiating normal from malignant tissue, as in the determination of surgical resection margins. MT I/II gene product may serve as a prognostic biomarker for laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. The differentially expressed genes and gene products may serve as sensitive biomarkers for improved early detection, diagnosis, and prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
    The Laryngoscope 04/2003; 113(3):393-400. · 1.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Experiments were carried out to investigate whether different lymphatic tumour cell lines have similar kinetic characteristics of phagocytosis of microorganisms. Six tumour cell lines were used. These were a human T-cell line (CEM), a mouse T-cell line (YAC-1), a human B-cell line (LAZ), and a human erythroleukemic tumour cells (K562), whereas 2 cell lines of professional phagocytosis were used as controls, a human macrophage cell line (THP1) and a mouse macrophage cell line (P388D1). Tumour cells were mixed with candida albicans at a ratio of 10:1 of candida to tumour cells and the percentage of tumour cells that had attached/phagocytosed candida was determined. After 4 h coculture with candida, tumour cells not of T-cell origin (LAZ and K562) showed moderate level of phagocytosis (28%), whereas tumour cells of T-cell origin (CEM and YAC-1) demonstrated low levels of phagocytosis (15%) as compared to macrophage cell lines (THP1 and P388D1) that showed maximum phagocytosis (64-78%). Acid phosphatase (AcPase) activity was increased by 33% during coculture of YAC-1 cells and yeast cells. In conclusion, the results suggest that lymphatic tumour cells of nonphagocytic origin acquire phagocytic properties during the course of malignancy, and digestion of phagocytosed yeast cells maybe related with AcPase activity, as well as that of other lysosomal enzymes. This phenomenon may represent one mechanism by which tumour cells downregulate immune surveillance.
    Acta Histochemica 02/2003; 105(2):127-33. · 1.61 Impact Factor