Sayoko Takano

Kanazawa Institute of Technology, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan

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Publications (12)10.1 Total impact

  • Sayoko Takano, Kiyoshi Honda
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    ABSTRACT: The larynx is the organ to adjust voice in speech important for controlling voice phonation, and the tensions of the vocal folds cord is controlled by the relative positions among the thyroid, arytenoid, and cricoid cartilages. Magnetic resonance images (MRI) have been employed to observe the positions of those cartilages, while however, visualizing the laryngeal muscles for activating moving those cartilages is still difficult with the conventional MRI. This study aims to visualize and identify the laryngeal muscles based on the composition of the three different sets of gray-scale MRI data into red, green, and blue channels, namely RGB-MRI. The types of imaging parameters image variations are field-echo opposed-phase (FE(op)), spin-echo proton density weighted (SE(PDw)), and spin-echo T1 weighted (SE(T1w)). This method for image composition helps usidentifying could reveal the location of the muscles in the laryngeal region in vivo. We have successfully identified the sternohyoid muscle, thyrohyoid muscle, lateral thyroarytenoid muscle, cricothyroid muscle, stenrocleidmustoid muscle, omohyoid muscle, and inferior constrictor muscles. The RGB-MRI could give further provide anatomical information of the larynx, especially about the muscle location and its deformation involved in on speech mechanisms, which will be useful for both research experts and beginners.
    The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 11/2013; 134(5):4168. · 1.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Physiological articulatory models have evolved from simpler forms to complex ones, while recent models preserve traits of oversimplification and anatomical unreality. This work combines MRI observations at ATR-BAIC and Johns Hopkins University to point to the issue for advancing extrinsic tongue muscle modeling. The genioglossus, previously thought to arise from the genial tubercle of the mandible, has direct fiber attachments on the short tendon of the tongue. The posterior genioglossus, being regarded as a functional division of the muscle, can be given anatomical definition to the horizontal bundle arising from the inferior aspect of the short tendon. The styloglossus has been modeled as linear strings traveling "free in air" before inserting into the tongue, but the extralingual part is actually restrained by the surrounding soft tissues to lack mobility. The intralingual styloglossus forms anterior and posterior slings in the tongue tissue, possibly with the distal fibers of the hyoglossus. Combined styloglossus and hyoglossus shortening via the slings may be a factor shaping the tongue into various forms. [Work supported by WQ20111200010, 2013CB329301, and NIDCD K99/R00-DC009279.].
    The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 05/2013; 133(5):3607. · 1.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The hypopharyngeal cavities consist of the laryngeal cavity and bilateral piriform fossa, constituting the bottom part of the vocal tract near the larynx. Visualisation of these cavities with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques reveals that during speech, the laryngeal cavity takes the form of a long-neck flask and the piriform fossa takes the form of a goblet of varying shapes: the former diminishes greatly in whispering and the latter disappears during deep inhalation. These cavities have been shown to exert significant acoustic effects at higher frequency spectra. In this study, acoustic experiments were conducted for male and female mechanical vocal tracts with the results that acoustic effects of those cavities determine the frequency spectra above 2 kHz, giving rise to peaks and zeros. An acoustic model of vowel production was proposed with three components: voice source, hypopharyngeal cavities and vocal tract proper, which provides effective means in controlling voice quality and expressing individual vocal characteristics.
    Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering 08/2010; 13(4):443-53. · 1.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This article provides experimental evidence for two hypotheses, the “interdental-space effect” and the “stabilization effect”, that may help to understand quantal acoustic properties of certain vowels. The interdental-space effect has its basis on the hypothesis [Stevens, K. N., & Perkell, J. S. (1977). Speech physiology and phonetic features. In M. S. Sawashima, & F. Cooper (Eds.), Dynamic aspect of speech production (pp. 323–341). Tokyo: University of Tokyo Press] that the gap between the upper and lower dental arches is involved in abrupt changes of oral cavity volume between low and high vowels. Our magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data indicate that this side cavity of the vocal tract is fused with the oral cavity in low vowels such as [a] but forms a bilateral side-branch in non-low vowels such as [i] and [e]. This abrupt change in the cavity's affiliation to the vocal tract contributes a discontinuity in otherwise smooth formant transitions. The stabilization effect [Fujimura, O., & Kakita, Y. (1979). Remarks on quantitative description of the lingual articulation. In B. Lindblom, & S. Öhman (Eds.), Frontiers of speech communication research (pp. 17–24). London: Academic Press] is the hypothesis that co-contraction among bundles of the genioglossus muscle stabilizes the formant pattern for [i], which was supported by analysis of electromyographic data. Our MRI-based measurement of tongue muscle geometry suggests an additional cause of vowel stabilization for [a]: posterior bulging of the tongue base for this vowel by the hyoglossus and styloglossus is mechanically limited by the parapharyngeal tissue that surrounds the extra-lingual styloglossus.
    Journal of Phonetics 01/2010; 38(1):33-43. · 1.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This presentation introduces our integration of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques at ATR Brain Activity Imaging Center (Kyoto, Japan) toward research into speech science and technology. The first breakthrough in our application of MRI to speech research was the motion imaging of the speech organs in articulation using a cardiac cine-MRI method. It enables us to acquire information in the time-space domain to reconstruct successive image frames using utterance repetitions synchronized with MRI scans. This cine-technique was further improved for high-quality imaging and expanded into three-dimensional (3D) visualization of articulatory movements. Using this technique, we could successfully obtain temporal changes of vocal-tract area function during a Japanese five-vowel sequence. This effort also contributed to developing other techniques to overcome the limitations of MRI, such as the post-hoc inclusion of teeth images in 3D volumes or the phonation-synchronized scan for crystal-sharp static imaging. Further, a custom high-sensitivity coil was developed to visualize the fine structures of the lip muscles and laryngeal airway. The potentials of new MRI approaches such as ultra-high-resolution imaging with a higher-field scanner or real-time motion imaging during a single utterance will be discussed toward future contributions to speech science and technology.
    The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 06/2008; 123(5):3734. · 1.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Roles of extrinsic and intrinsic tongue muscles in the production of vowel i were examined using a finite element method (FEM) applied to the tagged cine-MRI data. It has been thought that tongue tissue deformation for i is mainly due to the combined actions of the genioglossus muscle bundles advancing the tongue root to elevate the dorsum with a mid-line grooving. A recent study with the tagging-MRI revealed earlier, faster and greater tissue deformation at anterior top of the tongue than posterior part during ei production. This result implies the contribution of the intrinsic tongue muscle (transverse anterior) with an independent hydrostat mechanism from that of the genioglossus muscle bundles. In this study, a simple four-cube model is built to examine the co-contraction effect of the genioglossus and transverse muscles using using the FEM. The simulation result with the anterior transverse muscle (Ta) showed good agreement with the pattern of the tongue deformation obtained from the tagged-MRI data, suggesting that transverse anterior also plays an important role for the realization of the tongue shape for the production of vowel i.
    The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 06/2008; 123(5):3738. · 1.65 Impact Factor
  • Sayoko Takano, Kiyoshi Honda
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    ABSTRACT: Functions of the extrinsic tongue muscles in vowel production were examined by measurements of muscle length and tongue tissue deformation using MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). Results from the analysis of Japanese vowel data suggested: (1) Contraction and relaxation of the three subdivisions of the genioglossus (GG) play a dominant role in forming tongue shapes for vowels. (2) The extra-lingual part of the styloglossus (SG), which was previously thought to cause a high-back tongue position by pulling its insertion point in the tongue, was found to be nearly constant across all vowels both in length and orientation. (3) The tongue shape for back vowels is mainly achieved by internal deformation of the tongue tissue, and the medial tissue of the tongue showed lateral expansion in front vowels, and medial compression in back vowels.
    Speech Communication. 01/2007; 49:49-58.
  • INTERSPEECH 2007, 8th Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association, Antwerp, Belgium, August 27-31, 2007; 01/2007
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    ABSTRACT: The action of the cricothyoid joint for F0 control were investigated based on MRI of high spatial resolution and 3D image analysis. The data from a male speaker's sustained vowels at two fundamental frequencies (110 Hz and 165 Hz) were analyzed with a 3D pattern matching method to obtain displacements and angular changes of the thyroid and cricoid cartilages. Results show that the two cartilages rotate and translate relative to each other three-dimensionally, suggesting the nature of the cricothyroid joint actions of multiple degrees of freedom. The major components of joint rotation and translation are observed in the midsagittal plane: between the two levels of F0, the joint rotates 7.0 degrees, and it translates 1.2 mm horizontally and 0.6 mm vertically. The effect of these joint actions are discussed in relation to changes in vocal fold length.
    Acta Acustica united with Acustica 08/2006; 92(5):725-730. · 0.71 Impact Factor
  • IEICE Transactions. 01/2004; 87-D:1050-1058.
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    ABSTRACT: A synchronized sampling method (SSM) was developed for the study of voluntary movements by combining the electrocardiographic (ECG) gating method with an external triggering device, and four-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) at a rate of 30 frames per second was accomplished by volumetric imaging with the SSM. This method was first applied to the motion imaging of articulatory organs during repetitions of a Japanese five-vowel sequence, and the dynamic change in vocal tract area function was demonstrated with sufficient temporal resolution. This paper describes the methodology, applicability, and limitations of 4D-MRI with the SSM.
    Nippon Hoshasen Gijutsu Gakkai zasshi 01/2003; 58(12):1592-8.
  • 8th European Conference on Speech Communication and Technology, EUROSPEECH 2003 - INTERSPEECH 2003, Geneva, Switzerland, September 1-4, 2003; 01/2003