Di-Ying Huang

Chinese Academy of Sciences, Peping, Beijing, China

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Publications (41)146.89 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: A fourth genus of Mesozoic water measurers (Gerromorpha: Hydrometridae) is discovered and described from the remains of an individual preserved in mid-Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian) amber from northern Myanmar. Burmametra macrocarinata gen. et sp. nov. is compared with other Recent and extinct hydrometrid genera and shares apomorphies with the subfamily Hydrometrinae. Based on the distribution of characters states and a preliminary cladistic analysis, the genus is putatively basal among this subfamily. Together with those previous records in Burmese amber and the Crato Limestones of Brazil, Burmametra confirms the early diversification of the Hydrometridae by the Early Cretaceous.
    Cretaceous Research 01/2015; 52:118-126. DOI:10.1016/j.cretres.2014.09.001 · 2.39 Impact Factor
  • Di-Ying Huang, Yu-Nan Wang
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    ABSTRACT: Isoxys is a very common Cambrian bivalved arthropod, specimens of which are normally preserved only as valves. The discovery of the soft anatomy of Isoxys may greatly assist understanding affinities and functional morphology. Isoxys minor Luo and Hu in Luo et al., 2008 is the most common representative of all animal species known from the lower Cambrian Guanshan fauna (Cambrian Series 2, Stage 4) at the Shitangshan Section, near Kunming, Yunnan Province, Southwest China. Here we describe and reconstruct the morphology of I. minor on the basis of newly illustrated fossils and a few new specimens that bear soft-parts including new discovery of frontal grasping appendages. Like the soft anatomy of other known Isoxys, it bears a pair of large stalked eyes, a pair of specialized frontal grasping appendages, approximately 12–14 paired biramous limbs, and a helm-like tail exposed outside the valves.
    Palaeoworld 11/2014; DOI:10.1016/j.palwor.2014.10.006
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    ABSTRACT: The reconstruction and timing of the early stages of social evolution, such as parental care, in the fossil record is a challenge, as these behaviors often do not leave concrete traces. One of the intensely investigated examples of modern parental care are the modern burying beetles (Silphidae: Nicrophorus), a lineage that includes notable endangered species. Here we report diverse transitional silphids from the Mesozoic of China and Myanmar that provide insights into the origins of parental care. Jurassic silphids from Daohugou, sharing many defining characters of Nicrophorinae, primitively lack stridulatory files significant for parental care communications; although morphologically similar, Early Cretaceous nicrophorines from the Jehol biota possess such files, indicating that a system of parental care had evolved by this early date. More importantly, burying beetles of the genus Nicrophorus have their earliest first record in mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber, and document early evolution of elaborate biparental care and defense of small vertebrate carcasses for their larvae. Parental care in the Early Cretaceous may have originated from competition between silphids and their predators. The rise of the Cretaceous Nicrophorinae implies a biology similar to modern counterparts that typically feed on carcasses of small birds and mammals.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 09/2014; 111(39). DOI:10.1073/pnas.1412280111 · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    Chen-Yang Cai, Di-Ying Huang
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    ABSTRACT: The staphylinid subfamily Micropeplinae includes small strongly sclerotized beetles with truncate elytra leaving the most part of abdomen exposed. Fossil micropeplines are rare and confined to Cenozoic representatives of extant gen-era. Here, we describe the oldest micropepline, Protopeplus cretaceus gen. and sp. n., from the Upper Cretaceous Burmese amber. Fluorescence microscope and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) were both used to reveal diagnostic features of Micropeplinae and some primitive traits that place Protopeplus very basally within Micropeplinae.
    Naturwissenschaften 08/2014; 101(10). DOI:10.1007/s00114-014-1221-z · 1.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Thysanoptera (Paraneoptera) constitute a very diverse order of minute insects, characterized mainly by a 'punch-and-suck' mode of feeding due to a specialized asymmetrical gnathal apparatus with two maxillary stylets plus only one functional mandible. We have studied their fossil relatives from the Thripida family sensu Vishniakova (1981) and Zherikhin (2002), as revised by Nel et al. (2012a), in order to identify new morphological characters and help to polarize some of the characters present in the Thysanoptera. Here we present perfectly preserved specimens from the Middle Jurassic Daohugou beds of China, approximately 165 million years old, belonging to three new species and one new genus of Lophioneurida (Thripida): Lophiosina lini gen. et sp. nov., Undacypha bournieri sp. nov. and Undacypha kreiteri sp. nov. Precise analysis of the fossil heads revealed two ancestral mandibular sclerites that can still be found modified in the Recent thrips mouthcone, although in different ways in the two suborders of Thysanoptera, Terebrantia and Tubulifera. Their absence from the left side of the mouthcone of Terebrantia is a morphological apomorphy for this suborder. Studying fossils also allows us to inform the evolution of Thysanoptera in the deep past. Here we show that some of the characters usually thought to be apomorphies for Thysanoptera are instead apomorphies for all Thripida; this is the case for the typical gnathal apparatus but also for the eversible arolium and the fringe hairs. This leads us to redefine the Thysanoptera within the Thripida.
    Journal of Systematic Palaeontology 02/2014; 12(7):865-878. DOI:10.1080/14772019.2013.841781 · 2.85 Impact Factor
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    André Nel, Dany Azar, Di-Ying Huang
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    ABSTRACT: Juraheterophlebia sinica, a new species of damsel-dragonfly, is described from the Middle Jurassic of China. Its fore- and hind wings in connection to the body allows comparison of the type genera of the families Erichschmidtiidae and Juraheterophlebiidae, respectively based on a forewing and a hind wing. Juraheterophlebiidae is a junior synonym of the Erichschmidtiidae. The new fossil confirms the previous attributions of Erichschmidtia and Juraheterophlebia to the clade Heterophlebioptera. ????????????????? Juraheterophlebia sinica???????????????, ??????????????????Erichschmidtiidae??Juraheterophlebiidae????????? Juraheterophlebiidae?Erichschmidtiidae?????????????????: Erichschmidtia?Juraheterophlebia??Heterophlebioptera???
    Alcheringa An Australasian Journal of Palaeontology 01/2014; 38(1). DOI:10.1080/03115518.2014.843385 · 0.90 Impact Factor
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    Chen-Yang Cai, Di-Ying Huang
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    ABSTRACT: A new rove beetle, Sinanthobium daohugouense, new genus, new species, is described and illustrated on the basis of a tiny impression fossil from the Middle Jurassic Jiulongshan Formation at Daohugou, Inner Mongolia, China. The new genus is placed in the subfamily Omaliinae (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae), tentatively in the Recent tribe Anthophagini. The first find of a definitive omaliine beetle from the Middle Jurassic of China provides direct evidence on the origin and early evolution of Omaliinae.
    The Canadian Entomologist 10/2013; 145(05). DOI:10.4039/tce.2013.33 · 0.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The first two rove beetle fossils discovered from the Late Jurassic Talbragar Fish Bed in New South Wales, Australia are described and illustrated. Juroglypholoma talbragarense n. sp. is the second fossil record for one of the smallest and latest recognized staphylinid subfamily Glypholomatinae. The other staphylinid, Protachinus minor n. gen. n. sp., is an unusual member of extant subfamily Tachyporinae (tribe Tachyporini). It significantly retains several distinct features, including entire epistomal suture, and abdominal tergites III–VI each with a pair of basolateral ridges. The discovery of a new glypholomatine in Australia, together with recently reported one from the Middle Jurassic Daohugou biota of China, suggests the subfamily Glypholomatinae was probably much more widespread in the Jurassic than previously thought. INTRODUCTION
    Journal of Paleontology 08/2013; 87(4). DOI:10.1666/12-136 · 1.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Platydracus breviantennatus n. sp., is described and figured based on an impression fossil from the upper Eocene Florissant beds of Colorado, the United States. Based on the large and densely setose body, relatively small eyes, and robust mandibles (right mandible seemingly with one simple preapical tooth), tibiae and antennae, the new species is placed in the modern genus Platydracus Thomson, 1858. It differs from other species of Platydracus by its large body, small head, and distinctly short antennae.
    Palaeoworld 07/2013; DOI:10.1016/j.palwor.2013.07.001
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    ABSTRACT: A remarkable new rove beetle, Protodeleaster glaber gen. et sp. nov, is described and illustrated based on two well-preserved specimens from the Lower Cretaceous Yixian Formation of Liaoning Province, China. The new genus is placed in the extant staphylinid subfamily Oxytelinae, and recent tribe Euphaniini, based on several characteristic features (e.g. a single pair of wide paratergites on abdominal segments; open procoxal fissures; contiguous mesocoxae; abdominal sternite II short and poorly sclerotized). This find from the Early Cretaceous documents the oldest fossil representative of the tribe Euphaniini. Morphologically, it resembles most closely the recent genus Platydeleaster Schulke, 2003, an unusual member of the extant Oxytelinae. According to the currently accepted hypothesis of the phylogenetic position of Euphaniini and the prior discovery of other taxa from the Late Jurassic, we suggest the tribe might have first appeared at least as early as the Late Jurassic.
    Comptes Rendus Palevol 03/2013; 12(3):159–163. DOI:10.1016/j.crpv.2013.02.002 · 1.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Two different patterns of wing venation are currently supposed to be present in each of the three orders of Paraneoptera. This is unlikely compared with the situation in other insects where only one pattern exists per order. We propose for all Paraneoptera a new and unique interpretation of wing venation pattern, assuming that the convex cubitus anterior gets fused with the common stem of median and radial veins at or very near to wing base, after separation from concave cubitus posterior, and re-emerges more distally from R + M stem. Thereafter, the vein between concave cubitus posterior and CuA is a specialized crossvein called "cua-cup," proximally concave and distally convex. We show that despite some variations, that is, cua-cup can vary from absent to hypertrophic; CuA can re-emerge together with M or not, or even completely disappear, this new interpretation explains all situations among all fossil and recent paraneopteran lineages. We propose that the characters "CuA fused in a common stem with R and M"and "presence of specialized crossvein cua-cup" are venation apomorphies that support the monophyly of the Paraneoptera. In the light of these characters, we reinterpret several Palaeozoic and early Mesozoic fossils that were ascribed to Paraneoptera, and confirm the attribution of several to this superorder as well as possible attribution of Zygopsocidae (Zygopsocus permianus Tillyard, 1935) as oldest Psocodea. We discuss the situation in extinct Hypoperlida and Miomoptera, suggesting that both orders could well be polyphyletic, with taxa related to Archaeorthoptera, Paraneoptera, or even Holometabola. The Carboniferous Protoprosbolidae is resurrected and retransferred into the Paraneoptera. The genus Lithoscytina is restored. The miomopteran Eodelopterum priscum Schmidt, 1962 is newly revised and considered as a fern pinnule. In addition, the new paraneopteran Bruayaphis oudardi gen. nov. et sp. nov. is described fromthe Upper Carboniferous of France (see Supporting Information).
    Journal of Morphology 05/2012; 273(5):480-506. DOI:10.1002/jmor.11036 · 1.55 Impact Factor
  • European Journal of Entomology 10/2010; 107(4):615-620. DOI:10.14411/eje.2010.070 · 1.08 Impact Factor
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    André Nel, Di-ying Huang
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    ABSTRACT: Mongoliaeshna sinica gen. et sp. n., third record of the Mesozoic aeshnopteran family Progobiaeshnidae is described from the Lower Cretaceous of Yixian Formation in Liutiaogou (Ningcheng County, Inner Mongolia, China).
    Comptes Rendus Palevol 06/2010; 9(4):141-145. DOI:10.1016/j.crpv.2010.05.005 · 1.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Sinocalopteryx shangyongensis nov. gen., nov. sp., the first fossil calopterygoid from eastern Asia, is described from the earliest Eocene of Southwest China. Although the new genus has the principle synapomorphies of Calopterygoidea, it possesses a unique structure (possible reversal) in the pattern of vein RP1/2.
    Geobios 05/2010; 43(3):349-353. DOI:10.1016/j.geobios.2009.11.005 · 1.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The first Chinese and English representatives of the Mesozoic gomphid family Proterogomphidae are described, respectively Lingomphus magnificus gen. et sp. nov., and Cordulagomphus europaeus sp. nov. A phylogenetic analysis of the most ‘basal’ gomphid lineages is proposed, showing the monophyly of the Proterogomphidae and the position of Lingomphus as sister group of all other representatives of this family. C. europaeus is the first Eurasiatic representative of the subfamily Cordulagomphinae that was previously restricted to the Lower Cretaceous of Crato Formation (South America). The Proterogomphidae has a known distribution very similar to those of several other Lower Cretaceous insect groups, viz. Asia, Europe, and South America, showing that the distribution of the climates and land masses at that time was not a ‘serious’ impediment for the displacements of these organisms.
    Cretaceous Research 02/2010; 31(1):94-100. DOI:10.1016/j.cretres.2009.09.010 · 2.39 Impact Factor
  • Qi-Bin Lin, André Nel, Di-Ying Huang
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    ABSTRACT: Sinoagetopanorpa permiana n. gen., n. sp., first Chinese Permian Agetopanorpinae, is described and compared to the other genera of this group.
    Annales- Societe Entomologique de France 01/2010; 46(1-2):62-66. DOI:10.1080/00379271.2010.10697639 · 0.54 Impact Factor
  • Joël Minet, Di-Ying Huang, Hao Wu, André Nel
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    ABSTRACT: In recent times many authors have regarded the Protomeropidae and Microptysmatidae - two essentially Permian groups - as either early trichopteran lineages or members of the stem-group of the Amphiesmenoptera (basically: Trichoptera+Lepidoptera). Actually none of these families possesses, in its ground plan, the most significant derived trait of the amphiesmenopteran forewing, namely a true ‘double-Y loop’ arrangement of the anal veins. Since ‘Carpenter’s organs’, small rounded structures in the costal area of the hindwing, are only known to occur in certain members of the Permochoristidae, Kaltanidae and Protomeropidae, these three families should belong to a fossil clade, which we ascribe to the Mecoptera, suborder Pistillifera sensu lato, mainly on account of a few venational features. Although we maintain the Microptysmatidae in the Mecopterida (=Panorpida, i.e. Amphiesmenoptera, Mecoptera, Diptera, and relatives), we propose to place this family in a separate order: the Permotrichoptera, n. status. Indeed, apparently, Microptysmatidae can be ascribed neither to the Amphiesmenoptera nor to the Antliophora (=Mecoptera-Diptera complex).
    Annales- Societe Entomologique de France 01/2010; 46(1-2):262-270. DOI:10.1080/00379271.2010.10697667 · 0.54 Impact Factor
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    DI-YING HUANG, ANDRÉ NEL
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    ABSTRACT: The oldest webspinners, Sinembia rossi gen. et sp. nov. and Juraembia ningchengensis gen. et sp. nov., are described in the new family Sinembiidae fam. nov. from the Middle Jurassic of Inner Mongolia, China. They differ from the Cretaceous and more recent Embiodea in several plesiomorphic characters, namely they have a long ovipositor, three-segmented cerci, eyes situated on the posterolateral angles of the head, and the prothoracic prescutum is absent: these characters suggest habits that strongly differ from those of the recent taxa. The loss of the ovipositor and the reduction in the number of cerci can no longer be considered as synapomorphies of the ((Embiodea + Zoraptera) + Plecoptera) and (Embiodea + Zoraptera) clades, respectively. © 2009 The Linnean Society of London, Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2009, 156, 889–895.
    Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 08/2009; 156(4):889-895. DOI:10.1111/j.1096-3642.2008.00499.x · 2.66 Impact Factor
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    Di-Ying Huang, André Nel
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    ABSTRACT: Huang, D.-Y. & Nel, A., December, 2008. New ‘Grylloblattida’ related to the genus Prosepididontus Handlirsch, 1920 in the Middle Jurassic of China (Insecta: Geinitziidae). Alcheringa 32, 395–403. ISSN 0311-5518.On the basis of well-preserved nearly complete specimens, two new genera and species Sinosepididontus chifengensis and Megasepididontus grandis, both closely related to the Early Jurassic geinitziid genus Prosepididontus, are described. The new material was collected from the Middle Jurassic Jiulongshan Formation near the Daohugou Village, Ningcheng County, Inner Mongolia, northeast China. New body and leg structures are described for these Chinese taxa. They were previously unknown in other Geinitziidae. The new data indicate that the extinct ‘Grylloblattida’ contained heterogenous groups.
    Alcheringa An Australasian Journal of Palaeontology 12/2008; 32(4):395-403. DOI:10.1080/03115510802417893 · 0.90 Impact Factor
  • Andre Nel, Di-Ying Huang, Qi-Bin Lin
    European Journal of Entomology 10/2008; 105(4):783-787. DOI:10.14411/eje.2008.103 · 1.08 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

407 Citations
146.89 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2004–2013
    • Chinese Academy of Sciences
      • • State Key Laboratory of Paleobiology and Stratigraphy
      • • Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology
      Peping, Beijing, China
  • 2008
    • Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle
      • Department of Systematics and Evolution
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2001–2003
    • Academia Sinica
      T’ai-pei, Taipei, Taiwan