Bernard B Suh

University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, United States

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Publications (7)87.69 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The mission of the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project is to enable the scientific and medical communities to interpret the human genome sequence and apply it to understand human biology and improve health. The ENCODE Consortium is integrating multiple technologies and approaches in a collective effort to discover and define the functional elements encoded in the human genome, including genes, transcripts, and transcriptional regulatory regions, together with their attendant chromatin states and DNA methylation patterns. In the process, standards to ensure high-quality data have been implemented, and novel algorithms have been developed to facilitate analysis. Data and derived results are made available through a freely accessible database. Here we provide an overview of the project and the resources it is generating and illustrate the application of ENCODE data to interpret the human genome.
    PLoS Biology 04/2011; 9(4):e1001046. · 12.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We introduce a data structure, analysis, and visualization scheme called a cactus graph for comparing sets of related genomes. In common with multi-break point graphs and A-Bruijn graphs, cactus graphs can represent duplications and general genomic rearrangements, but additionally, they naturally decompose the common substructures in a set of related genomes into a hierarchy of chains that can be visualized as two-dimensional multiple alignments and nets that can be visualized in circular genome plots. Supplementary Material is available at www.liebertonline.com/cmb .
    Journal of computational biology: a journal of computational molecular cell biology 03/2011; 18(3):469-81. · 1.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: 'Orang-utan' is derived from a Malay term meaning 'man of the forest' and aptly describes the southeast Asian great apes native to Sumatra and Borneo. The orang-utan species, Pongo abelii (Sumatran) and Pongo pygmaeus (Bornean), are the most phylogenetically distant great apes from humans, thereby providing an informative perspective on hominid evolution. Here we present a Sumatran orang-utan draft genome assembly and short read sequence data from five Sumatran and five Bornean orang-utan genomes. Our analyses reveal that, compared to other primates, the orang-utan genome has many unique features. Structural evolution of the orang-utan genome has proceeded much more slowly than other great apes, evidenced by fewer rearrangements, less segmental duplication, a lower rate of gene family turnover and surprisingly quiescent Alu repeats, which have played a major role in restructuring other primate genomes. We also describe a primate polymorphic neocentromere, found in both Pongo species, emphasizing the gradual evolution of orang-utan genome structure. Orang-utans have extremely low energy usage for a eutherian mammal, far lower than their hominid relatives. Adding their genome to the repertoire of sequenced primates illuminates new signals of positive selection in several pathways including glycolipid metabolism. From the population perspective, both Pongo species are deeply diverse; however, Sumatran individuals possess greater diversity than their Bornean counterparts, and more species-specific variation. Our estimate of Bornean/Sumatran speciation time, 400,000 years ago, is more recent than most previous studies and underscores the complexity of the orang-utan speciation process. Despite a smaller modern census population size, the Sumatran effective population size (N(e)) expanded exponentially relative to the ancestral N(e) after the split, while Bornean N(e) declined over the same period. Overall, the resources and analyses presented here offer new opportunities in evolutionary genomics, insights into hominid biology, and an extensive database of variation for conservation efforts.
    Nature 01/2011; 469(7331):529-33. · 38.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The ENCODE project is an international consortium with a goal of cataloguing all the functional elements in the human genome. The ENCODE Data Coordination Center (DCC) at the University of California, Santa Cruz serves as the central repository for ENCODE data. In this role, the DCC offers a collection of high-throughput, genome-wide data generated with technologies such as ChIP-Seq, RNA-Seq, DNA digestion and others. This data helps illuminate transcription factor-binding sites, histone marks, chromatin accessibility, DNA methylation, RNA expression, RNA binding and other cell-state indicators. It includes sequences with quality scores, alignments, signals calculated from the alignments, and in most cases, element or peak calls calculated from the signal data. Each data set is available for visualization and download via the UCSC Genome Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu/). ENCODE data can also be retrieved using a metadata system that captures the experimental parameters of each assay. The ENCODE web portal at UCSC (http://encodeproject.org/) provides information about the ENCODE data and links for access.
    Nucleic Acids Research 10/2010; 39(Database issue):D871-5. · 8.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We formalize the problem of recovering the evolutionary history of a set of genomes that are related to an unseen common ancestor genome by operations of speciation, deletion, insertion, duplication, and rearrangement of segments of bases. The problem is examined in the limit as the number of bases in each genome goes to infinity. In this limit, the chromosomes are represented by continuous circles or line segments. For such an infinite-sites model, we present a polynomial-time algorithm to find the most parsimonious evolutionary history of any set of related present-day genomes.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 10/2008; 105(38):14254-61. · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Accurately reconstructing the large-scale gene order in an ancestral genome is a critical step to better understand genome evolution. In this paper, we propose a heuristic algorithm, called DUPCAR, for reconstructing ancestral genomic orders with duplications. The method starts from the order of genes in modern genomes and predicts predecessor and successor relationships in the ancestor. Then a greedy algorithm is used to reconstruct the ancestral orders by connecting genes into contiguous regions based on predicted adjacencies. Computer simulation was used to validate the algorithm. We also applied the method to reconstruct the ancestral chromosome X of placental mammals and the ancestral genomes of the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia.
    Journal of computational biology: a journal of computational molecular cell biology 10/2008; 15(8):1007-27. · 1.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This article analyzes mammalian genome rearrangements at higher resolution than has been published to date. We identify 3171 intervals, covering approximately 92% of the human genome, within which we find no rearrangements larger than 50 kilobases (kb) in the lineages leading to human, mouse, rat, and dog from their most recent common ancestor. Combining intervals that are adjacent in all contemporary species produces 1338 segments that may contain large insertions or deletions but that are free of chromosome fissions or fusions as well as inversions or translocations >50 kb in length. We describe a new method for predicting the ancestral order and orientation of those intervals from their observed adjacencies in modern species. We combine the results from this method with data from chromosome painting experiments to produce a map of an early mammalian genome that accounts for 96.8% of the available human genome sequence data. The precision is further increased by mapping inversions as small as 31 bp. Analysis of the predicted evolutionary breakpoints in the human lineage confirms certain published observations but disagrees with others. Although only a few mammalian genomes are currently sequenced to high precision, our theoretical analyses and computer simulations indicate that our results are reasonably accurate and that they will become highly accurate in the foreseeable future. Our methods were developed as part of a project to reconstruct the genome sequence of the last ancestor of human, dogs, and most other placental mammals.
    Genome Research 01/2007; 16(12):1557-65. · 14.40 Impact Factor