Article

Interleukin-2 production in whole blood cell cultures of women undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation for assisted reproduction technology cycles.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tiqva and Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
American journal of reproductive immunology (New York, N.Y.: 1989) (Impact Factor: 3.32). 10/2003; 50(3):220-3. DOI: 10.1034/j.1600-0897.2003.00061.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To determine whether human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) modulates the in vitro release of interleukin (IL-2) from human peripheral lymphocytes and monocytes derived from patients undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH).
A large university-based IVF unit was used for the study. Blood was drawn thrice from 12 women undergoing our routine IVF long gonadotropin-releasing-hormone-analog protocol during the COH cycle: (1) day on which adequate suppression was obtained (Day-S); (2) day of or prior to hCG administration (Day-hCG); and (3) day of ovum pick-up (Day-OPU). At each point of time, blood was tested for sex-steroid levels and then cultured for 72 hr either without (control-culture) or with hCG (hCG-culture) or with mitogenic stimulation by phytohemagglutinin (PHA-culture). The culture-medium supernatants were tested for IL-2 levels with a commercial sandwich enzyme-linked immunoassay.
Whole blood culture IL-2 levels increased significantly during COH until peak E2, and then decreased significantly after hCG administration. IL-2 levels were decreased in the control- and PHA-culture media on Day-OPU compared with Day-hCG. There were no significant correlations between IL-2 levels in the culture media and serum estradiol, progesterone or human chorionic gonadotropin levels.
Apparently, hCG attenuates IL-2 production by mononuclear cells with and without mitogenic stimulation, irrespective of the estradiol level. This suggests that hCG may indirectly modulate the inflammatory response, resulting in the ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
34 Views
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study was to investigate whether controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) using multi-dose gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist results in a lesser degree of systemic inflammation than the GnRH-agonist long protocol. Prospective, observational study. Blood was drawn three times during the COH cycle from patients undergoing the long GnRH-agonist protocol (agonist group) (n = 12) or the multi-dose GnRH-antagonist protocol (antagonist group) (n = 15): the day on which adequate suppression was obtained (agonist group), or day 2 or 3 of the menstrual cycle and before gonadotropin treatment (antagonist group) (Day-0); the day of or prior to administration of human chorionic gonadotropin (Day-hCG); and the day of ovum pick-up (Day-OPU). Levels of sex steroids and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) were compared between the two study groups among the three time points. While no between-group differences were observed in patient age or ovarian stimulation characteristics, a significantly higher number of oocytes were retrieved in the antagonist compared with the agonist group. In both groups, serum CRP levels were significantly higher on Day-OPU than on Day-hCG and Day-0. While serum CRP levels were higher on Day-hCG than Day-0, the difference was statistically significant only for the agonist group (p < 0.05). Moreover, Day-OPU serum CRP levels were significantly higher in the agonist than in the antagonist subgroup. COH using the multi-dose GnRH-antagonist protocol yields a lesser degree of systemic inflammation, as reflected by CRP levels, than the GnRH-agonist long protocol.
    Gynecological Endocrinology 06/2007; 23(8):494-6. · 1.30 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To investigate the behavior and association of serum sex-steroids and serum CD40 ligand in patients undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) for in vitro fertilization (IVF). Prospective, observational study. The IVF unit of an academic medical center. Blood was drawn three times during the COH cycle from 17 patients undergoing the long gonadotropin-releasing hormone-analog protocol: (i) day on which adequate suppression was obtained (Day-S); (ii) day of or prior to administration of human chorionic gonadotropin (Day-hCG); and (iii) day of ovum pick-up (Day-OPU). Levels of sex steroids and serum CD40 ligand were compared among the three time points. During gonadotropin treatment, serum ovarian sex steroids (estradiol, progesterone, free testosterone and androstenedione) significantly increased while CD40 ligand levels nonsignificantly decreased. After hCG administration, there was a significant increase in the levels of serum CD40 ligand, ovarian androgens, and progesterone, with a significant decrease in estradiol levels. No correlations were observed between CD40 ligand and ovarian sex-steroid levels or other treatment variables. The administration of hCG leads to activation of systemic inflammation, as reflected by CD40 ligand levels. This, in turn, may lead to the development of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome via several mechanisms, including an increase in several angiogenic factors.
    American journal of reproductive immunology (New York, N.Y.: 1989) 11/2006; 56(4):243-8. · 3.32 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To establish correlations between laboratory findings and clinical symptoms of moderate and severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). A retrospective study. Department of obstetrics and gynecology, public clinical hospital. Nineteen women admitted to the public hospital with a diagnosis of OHSS. The procedure of controlled ovarian stimulation (COH) was performed in the private assisted reproductive technology centre. Blood samples were collected, ultrasound examination of ovaries, abdominal circumference measurement were performed, intravenous crystalloids, plasma expanders such colloids and albumin were given. Correlations between mean laboratory results (haematocrit, c-reactive protein (CRP), white blood count, serum protein, serum albumin), ovarian size in ultrasound examination, abdominal circumference, and amount of albumin and hydroxyethyl starch transfused to the patient were assessed. Significant correlation was observed between CRP concentration and abdominal circumference measured when the patient was admitted to the department, between CRP concentration and ovarian size measured during ultrasound examination at admission and between CRP concentration and body weight. CRP can be a potential candidate to an indicator of OHSS severity.
    Gynecological Endocrinology 02/2010; 26(6):399-403. · 1.30 Impact Factor