Article

Allergic contact dermatitis from a condensate of boric acid, monoethanolamine and fatty acids in a metalworking fluid.

Department of Dermatology, Odense University Hospital, University of Southern Denmark and National Allergy Research Centre, Gentofte, Denmark.
Contact Dermatitis (Impact Factor: 2.93). 08/2003; 49(1):45-6. DOI: 10.1111/j.0105-1873.2003.0120e.x
Source: PubMed
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    ABSTRACT: Based on the information of the interdisciplinary task force on allergy diagnostics in the metal branch, in 2001, the German Contact Dermatitis Research Group (DKG) compiled two metalworking fluid (MWF) test series with currently and previously used components, respectively. After 2 years of patch testing, we present results obtained with these series, based on data of the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology (IVDK). 251 metalworkers who were patch tested because of suspected MWF dermatitis in 2002 and 2003 were included in this retrospective data analysis. Of these, 206 were tested with the current MWF series and 155 with the historical MWF series. Among the current MWF allergens, monoethanolamine ranked 1st with 11.6% positive reactions. Diethanolamine (3.0%), triethanolamine (1.1%), and diglycolamine (1.9%) elicited positive reactions far less frequently. Allergic reactions to p-aminoazobenzene were frequently observed (6.0%), but the relevance of these reactions is still obscure. Positive reactions to biocides ranged from 4.5% for Bioban CS 1135 to 0.5% for iodopropynyl butylcarbamate and 2-phenoxyethanol. Concomitant reactions to formaldehyde, which caused positive reactions in 3.3%, and formaldehyde releasers occurred to varying extents without conclusive pattern. No positive reactions were seen to dibutyl phthalate, di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate, tricresyl phosphate, isopropyl myristate or benzotriazole. With the historical MWF test series, positive reactions to methyldibromo glutaronitrile (MDBGN) were observed most frequently. However, sensitization via allergen sources other than MWF seems likely, as MDBGN, during the study period, has been one of the most frequent preservative allergens in cosmetics and body care products. Other historical MWF allergens comprised morpholinyl mercaptobenzothiazole (3.3%), benzisothiazolinone (BIT; 2.0%) and Bioban P 1487(1.3%). BIT is currently used in MWF again, so it was shifted to the current MWF test series. As decreasing reaction frequencies to former MWF allergens that are no longer used can be expected, the historical series should be re-evaluated after some years. The test series with current MWF allergens has to be kept up-to-date based on information from industry and to be kept concise by eliminating test substances which never cause positive reactions.
    Contact Dermatitis 10/2004; 51(3):118-30. · 2.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Metalworking fluids (MWF) are complex mixtures potentially containing various irritants and allergens. Occupational contact dermatitis is common in metal workers exposed to MWF. Important MWF allergens are monoethanolamine, oxidations products of resin acids, formaldehyde and formaldehyde releasers and so on. Contact allergy due to MWF may be under-diagnosed because many allergens are not commercially available for patch testing, in spite of recent improvements of allergy diagnostics in this field. Therefore, patch testing with MWF from the patients’ workplace is crucial. In this chapter, MWF allergens are presented in detail, a MWF patch test series is recommended, rare MWF allergens are described and a guideline for patch testing with MWF from the workplace is given.
    12/2010: pages 681-694;
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    ABSTRACT: The composition of water-based metalworking fluids (wb MWF) is complex, and various admixtures may be added before or during usage. Wb MWF may cause irritant as well as allergic contact dermatitis. While several current case reports point towards allergens particularly related to wb MWF, systematic studies have not been performed for several years. From 1999 to 2001, a study on contact allergies among patients with occupational dermatitis (OD) called "Fruhzeitige Erkennung allergener Stoffe bei beruflicher und nicht-beruflicher Exposition" (German acronym: FaSt) was conducted by the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology (IVDK), funded by the employers' liability insurances in Germany (HVBG). The objective of FaSt was to detect sensitization patterns related to particular occupational exposures. Anamnestic and clinical data were gathered using a standardised questionnaire. Patch test results were recorded by computer within the IVDK routine procedure. In addition to descriptive statistical analyses, logistic regression analysis was performed to control the effect of potential confounders. Among the 1842 OD patients in the FaSt study, there were 160 metalworkers exposed to wb MWF, whose data is presented in this paper. A specific allergen pattern of these patients can be described: most frequently, sensitizations to monoethanolamine (MEA), colophony/abietic acid, and fragrance mix were observed. Additionally, cobalt, formaldehyde, formaldehyde releasers and other biocides are important allergens in these patients. Preventive measures and aimed in-depth research may be based on these results. The special MWF test series have to be kept up to date based on exposure information from the MWF industry and on continuous surveillance of the target group.
    International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health 11/2004; 77(8):543-51. · 2.10 Impact Factor

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