Article

AP-1: a double-edged sword in tumorigenesis.

Research Institute of Molecular Pathology, Dr Bohr Gasse 7, A-1030 Vienna, Austria.
Nature reviews. Cancer (Impact Factor: 37.91). 12/2003; 3(11):859-68. DOI: 10.1038/nrc1209
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The AP-1 transcription factor is a dimeric complex that contains members of the JUN, FOS, ATF and MAF protein families. AP-1 proteins are primarily considered to be oncogenic, but recent studies have challenged this view — some AP-1 proteins, such as JUNB and c-FOS, have been shown to have tumour-suppressor activity. Here, we focus on the JUN and FOS proteins and aim to offer a new perspective on the molecular mechanisms that regulate the oncogenic and anti-oncogenic effects of AP-1 in tumour development.

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