Article

Genetic diversity of HIV in Africa: impact on diagnosis, treatment, vaccine development and trials

AIDS (Impact Factor: 6.56). 01/2004; 17(18):2547-60. DOI: 10.1097/01.aids.0000096895.73209.89
Source: PubMed
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