Article

Integrating antithrombin and antiplatelet therapies with early invasive management for non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes.

Duke Clinical Research Institute and Division of Cardiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27715, USA.
The American Journal of Medicine (Impact Factor: 5.3). 02/2004; 116(2):119-29. DOI: 10.1016/j.amjmed.2003.09.028
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes are a dramatic manifestation of coronary artery disease. Multiple clinical trials have shown that early cardiac catheterization improves clinical outcomes in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes. Many antithrombotic agents effectively manage unstable coronary syndromes and serve as adjuncts to percutaneous coronary intervention. Yet, the growing number of pharmacologic agents makes early management of non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes increasingly complex. We review the current evidence regarding the optimal integration of early antithrombotic and antiplatelet therapies with early coronary angiography and subsequent revascularization.

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