Article

The psychosocial aspects of children exposed to war: practice and policy initiatives

Yale Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520-7900, USA.
Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (Impact Factor: 5.67). 02/2004; 45(1):41-62. DOI: 10.1046/j.0021-9630.2003.00304.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The atrocities of war have detrimental effects on the development and mental health of children that have been documented since World War II. To date, a considerable amount of knowledge about various aspects of this problem has been accumulated, including the ways in which trauma impacts child mental health and development, as well as intervention techniques, and prevention methods. Considering the large populations of civilians that experience the trauma of war, it is timely to review existing literature, summarize approaches for helping war-affected children, and suggest future directions for research and policy.

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