Article

Comparison of the genome of the oral pathogen Treponema denticola with other spirochete genomes.

The Institute for Genomic Research, 9712 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, MD 20850, USA.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Impact Factor: 9.81). 05/2004; 101(15):5646-51. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0307639101
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We present the complete 2,843,201-bp genome sequence of Treponema denticola (ATCC 35405) an oral spirochete associated with periodontal disease. Analysis of the T. denticola genome reveals factors mediating coaggregation, cell signaling, stress protection, and other competitive and cooperative measures, consistent with its pathogenic nature and lifestyle within the mixed-species environment of subgingival dental plaque. Comparisons with previously sequenced spirochete genomes revealed specific factors contributing to differences and similarities in spirochete physiology as well as pathogenic potential. The T. denticola genome is considerably larger in size than the genome of the related syphilis-causing spirochete Treponema pallidum. The differences in gene content appear to be attributable to a combination of three phenomena: genome reduction, lineage-specific expansions, and horizontal gene transfer. Genes lost due to reductive evolution appear to be largely involved in metabolism and transport, whereas some of the genes that have arisen due to lineage-specific expansions are implicated in various pathogenic interactions, and genes acquired via horizontal gene transfer are largely phage-related or of unknown function.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
125 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Metagenomics is a relatively new but fast growing field within environmental biology and medical sciences. It enables researchers to understand the diversity of microbes, their functions, cooperation, and evolution in a particular ecosystem. Traditional methods in genomics and microbiology are not efficient in capturing the structure of the microbial community in an environment. Nowadays, high-throughput next-generation sequencing technologies are powerfully driving the metagenomic studies. However, there is an urgent need to develop efficient statistical methods and computational algorithms to rapidly analyze the massive metagenomic short sequencing data and to accurately detect the features/functions present in the microbial community. Although several issues about functions of metagenomes at pathways or subsystems level have been investigated, there is a lack of studies focusing on functional analysis at a low level of a hierarchical functional tree, such as SEED subsystem tree.
    PLoS ONE 09/2014; 9(9):e106588. · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The oral spirochete bacterium Treponema putidum inhabits human periodontal niches. The complete genome sequence of the OMZ 758(T) (ATCC 700334(T)) strain of this species was determined, revealing a 2,796,913-bp chromosome, with a G+C content of 37.30% and a single plasmid (pTPu1; 3,649 bp) identical to pTS1 from Treponema denticola.
    Genome Announcements 09/2014; 2(5).
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola are strongly associated with chronic periodontitis. These bacteria have been co-localized in subgingival plaque and demonstrated to exhibit symbiosis in growth in vitro and synergistic virulence upon co-infection in animal models of disease. Here we show that during continuous co-culture a P. gingivalis:T. denticola cell ratio of 6∶1 was maintained with a respective increase of 54% and 30% in cell numbers when compared with mono-culture. Co-culture caused significant changes in global gene expression in both species with altered expression of 184 T. denticola and 134 P. gingivalis genes. P. gingivalis genes encoding a predicted thiamine biosynthesis pathway were up-regulated whilst genes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis were down-regulated. T. denticola genes encoding virulence factors including dentilisin and glycine catabolic pathways were significantly up-regulated during co-culture. Metabolic labeling using 13C-glycine showed that T. denticola rapidly metabolized this amino acid resulting in the production of acetate and lactate. P. gingivalis may be an important source of free glycine for T. denticola as mono-cultures of P. gingivalis and T. denticola were found to produce and consume free glycine, respectively; free glycine production by P. gingivalis was stimulated by T. denticola conditioned medium and glycine supplementation of T. denticola medium increased final cell density 1.7-fold. Collectively these data show P. gingivalis and T. denticola respond metabolically to the presence of each other with T. denticola displaying responses that help explain enhanced virulence of co-infections.
    PLoS Pathogens 03/2014; 10(3):e1003955. · 8.06 Impact Factor

Full-text (2 Sources)

Download
76 Downloads
Available from
Jun 1, 2014