Article

Unilateral deep brain stimulation of the internal globus pallidus alleviates tardive dyskinesia

Department of Neurology, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Hannover, Germany.
Movement Disorders (Impact Factor: 5.63). 05/2004; 19(5):583-5. DOI: 10.1002/mds.10705
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We describe a patient with fluspirilene-induced tardive dyskinesia of the choreiform oro-facial-laryngeal type resistant to various conservative approaches for 7 years who underwent deep brain stimulation of the internal pallidal globe. We found immediate and marked suppression of her perioral involuntary movements with unilateral stimulation at 60 Hz.

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