Article

Comparative pathology of nerve sheath tumors in mouse models and humans.

Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
Cancer Research (Impact Factor: 8.65). 06/2004; 64(10):3718-24. DOI: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-03-4079
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Despite the progress made in our understanding of the biology of neurofibromatosis (NF), the long-term clinical outcome for affected patients has not changed significantly in the past decades, and both NF1 and NF2 are still associated with a significant morbidity and a decreased life span. A number of NF1 and NF2 murine models have been generated to aid in the study of NF tumor biology and in the development of targeted therapies for NF patients. A single, universal pathological classification of the lesions generated in these murine models is essential for the validation of the models, for their analysis and comparison with other models, and for their future effective use in preclinical treatment trials. For the formulation of a pathological classification of these lesions, the WHO classification of human tumors was used as a reference. However, it was not adopted for the classification of the GEM lesions because of some important differences between the human and murine lesions. A novel classification scheme for peripheral nerve sheath tumors in murine models was therefore devised.

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