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    ABSTRACT: Abdominal sarcoidosis is an uncommon form of sarcoidosis. The clinical presentation of esophageal, gastric, small bowel, colon, appendicular, spleen, pancreas, and abdominal aortic sarcoidosis are discussed in this review. The differential diagnosis of abdominal sarcoidosis is extensive. Other granulomatous diseases including tuberculosis, fungal infections, parasitic diseases, infl ammatory bowel disease, and Whipple's disease should be excluded before making the diagnosis of gastrointestinal sarcoidosis. Corticosteroid therapy is the mainstay of medical therapy in abdominal sarcoidosis. Second line agents such as methotrexate are also discussed. Surgical intervention may be necessary in patients with bowel obstruction, perforation, or massive hemorrhage. The authors also provide their experience regarding preoperative pulmonary evaluation of patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis undergoing surgery.
    Crit Care & Shock. 01/2007; 10.
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    ABSTRACT: Sarcoidosis is a multisystem disease characterized by noncaseating granulomas in the affected organs, including skin, heart, nervous system, and joints. Diagnosis of sarcoidosis is generally based upon a compatible history, demonstration of granulomas in at least two different organs, negative staining and culture for acid fast bacilli, absence of occupational or domestic exposure to toxins, and lack of drug-induced disease. Involvement of the hollow organs is rare. Rather than being due to sarcoidosis, some reported mucosal lesions may simply have incidental granulomas. Extrinsic compression from lymphadenopathy can occur throughout the gastrointestinal tract. The stomach, particularly the antrum, is the most common extrahepatic organ to be involved, while the small bowel is the least common. Liver involvement frequently occurs and ranges from asymptomatic incidental granulomas to portal hypertension from granulomas in the portal triad, usually with relatively preserved liver function. CT scans show hepatosplenomegaly and adenopathy, followed in frequency by focal low-attenuation lesions of the liver and spleen. Ascites is usually a transudate from right heart failure (because of pulmonary hypertension) or portal hypertension (because of biliary cirrhosis). Rarely, an exudative ascites may occur from studding of the peritoneum with nodules. Pancreatic involvement presents as a mass, usually in the head or a diffusely firm, nodular organ. Corticosteroids should be instituted when organ function is threatened, usually lungs, eyes, and central nervous system. Their role in the treatment of hepatic sarcoidosis is unclear. The overall prognosis is good although most patients will have some permanent organ impairment. Cardiac and pulmonary diseases are the main causes of death.
    The American Journal of Gastroenterology 11/2008; 103(12):3184-92; quiz 3193. · 9.21 Impact Factor