Article

Barrier function in transgenic mice overexpressing K16, involucrin, and filaggrin in the suprabasal epidermis.

Journal of Investigative Dermatology (Impact Factor: 6.37). 10/2004; 123(3):603-6. DOI: 10.1111/j.0022-202X.2004.23226.x
Source: PubMed
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