Article

ICA69 autoantibodies in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

Lupus (Impact Factor: 2.48). 02/2004; 13(6):483-4.
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    ABSTRACT: Oral Diseases (2012) doi: 10.1111/j.1601-0825.2012.01930.x Sjögren's syndrome (SjS) is one of the most common autoimmune rheumatic diseases, clinically characterized by xerostomia and keratoconjunctivitis sicca. We investigated the following controversial topics: (i) Do we have reliable ways of assessing saliva production? (ii) How important are the quantity and quality of saliva? (iii) Are only anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La relevant for the diagnosis of SjS? (iv) Are the American-European Consensus criteria (AECC) the best way to diagnose SjS? Results from literature searches suggested the following: (i) Despite the fact that numerous tests are available to assess salivation rates, direct comparisons among them are scarce with little evidence to suggest one best test. (ii) Recent developments highlight the importance of investigating the composition of saliva. However, more research is needed to standardize the methods of analysis and collection and refine the quality of the accumulating data. (iii) In addition to anti-Ro/La autoantibodies, anti α-fodrin IgA and anti-MR3 autoantibodies seem to be promising diagnostic markers of SjS, but more studies are warranted to test their sensitivity and specificity. (iv) AECC are classification, not diagnostic criteria. Moreover, recent innovations have not been incorporated into these criteria. Consequently, treatment directed to patients diagnosed using the AECC might exclude a significant proportion of patients with SjS.
    Oral Diseases 03/2012; 19(1). DOI:10.1111/j.1601-0825.2012.01930.x · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Context: Factors common to multiple autoimmune diseases have been sought vigorously. Graves' disease (GD) and type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) involve end-organ remodeling. Fibrocytes participate in inflammatory diseases and were recently shown to express thyroid-specific proteins such as the thyrotropin receptor and thyroglobulin. Objective: To determine whether a broader repertoire of autoantigen expression, such as proteins associated with T1DM, can be ascribed to fibrocytes. Design/Setting/Participants: Fibrocytes and fibroblasts were collected and analyzed from healthy individuals and those with autoimmune diseases in an academic clinical practice. Main outcome measures: Real-time PCR, Western blot analysis, gene promoter analysis, cell transfections, and flow cytometric cell sorting Results: IA-2 and ICA69, two islet-specific proteins implicated in T1DM, are expressed by fibrocytes from healthy donors and those with T1DM, GD, and multiple sclerosis. Both transcripts are detected by PCR, the proteins are resolved on Western blots, and both gene promoters are active in fibrocytes. Levels of ICA69 are substantially higher than those of IA-2 in fibrocytes. ICA69 localizes to CD34(+) GD orbital fibroblasts derived from fibrocytes while higher levels of IA-2 are found in CD34(-) cells. Conclusions: In addition to autoantigens implicated in thyroid autoimmunity, fibrocytes and derivative fibroblasts express multiple autoantigens associated with T1DM. This expression results from active gene promoters and abundant steady-state mRNA encoding ICA69 and IA-2. These latest findings demonstrate that fibrocytes express antigens relevant to multiple forms of endocrine autoimmunity. They suggest the potential for these cells playing a direct role in immune reactivity directed at the thyroid and pancreatic islets.
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    BMC Genomics 11/2014; 15(1):1017. DOI:10.1186/1471-2164-15-1017 · 4.04 Impact Factor