Article

Randomised controlled trial of glove perforation in single and double gloving in episiotomy repair after vaginal delivery

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ramathibodi Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400, Thailand.
Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research (Impact Factor: 0.93). 10/2004; 30(5):354-7. DOI: 10.1111/j.1447-0756.2004.00208.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The aims of the study presented here were to compare the rate of glove perforation between single-gloving and double-gloving methods, and the time of operation and level of surgeon in episiotomy repair after vaginal delivery.
A prospective randomized controlled trial was performed from the beginning of May to the end of December, 2002 at Ramathibodi Hospital. A comparison of glove perforation between single-gloving and double-gloving methods was performed. Glove perforations were tested by filling each glove with water. Glove perforation rate, position of perforation, time of operation and surgeon level of experience were analyzed.
One hundred and fifty sets of double-gloving method and 150 sets of single-gloving method were evaluated. The glove perforation rates were 4.6 and 18% in double-inner gloves and single-gloves, respectively, with statistical difference (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference between glove perforation rates in double-outer gloves (22.6%) and single-gloves (18%). There was matched perforation of the same finger of both outer and inner gloves in 2% of all double-inner gloves. The frequency of glove perforation was classified by the surgeon's level of experience and time of operation was no difference in each level.
The double-gloving method significantly reduced the risk of exposure of the surgeon's hand to the patient's blood, when compared with the single-gloving method in episiotomy repair. There were no differences in the rate of glove perforations compared to the time of operation and level of surgeon.

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    • "In terms of outcome measures, the rate of glove perforation was assessed in all studies [5, 8, 9, 18–28]. Other outcome measures included detection rate of glove perforation (5 studies), evaluation of the devices used (4 studies), the relationship between glove perforation and the job level of surgeons (3 studies), the relationship between glove perforation and duration of the operation (8 studies), the relationship between glove perforation and surgical types (3 studies), frequency of glove perforations by position on surgical team (3 studies), changes in knowledge and self-reported universal precautions behaviour, observed adherence to universal precautions, and self-reported needle-stick/sharp injuries (1 study). "
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