Article

A randomized clinical trial of a brief motivational intervention for alcohol-positive adolescents treated in an emergency department

Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Brown Medical School, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912, USA.
Journal of Pediatrics (Impact Factor: 3.74). 10/2004; 145(3):396-402. DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2004.04.057
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We tested whether a brief motivational interview (MI) would reduce alcohol-related consequences and use among adolescents treated in an emergency department (ED) after an alcohol-related event. Patients aged 13 to 17 years (N = 152) with a positive blood alcohol concentration (BAC) by lab test or self-report were recruited in the ED and randomly assigned to receive either MI or standard care (SC). Both conditions resulted in reduced quantity of drinking during the 12-month follow-up, whereas alcohol-related negative consequences were relatively low and stayed low at follow-up. Adolescents who screened positive for problematic alcohol use at baseline reported significantly more improvement on 2 of 3 alcohol use outcomes (average number of drinking days per month and frequency of high-volume drinking) if they received MI compared with SC. We conclude that brief interventions are recommended for adolescents who present to an ED with an alcohol-related event and report preexisting problematic alcohol use.

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