Article

Second-impact syndrome.

University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA.
The Journal of School Nursing (Impact Factor: 1.01). 11/2004; 20(5):262-7. DOI: 10.1177/10598405040200050401
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Sports-related injuries are among the more common causes of injury in adolescents that can result in concussion and its sequelae, postconcussion syndrome and second-impact syndrome (SIS). Students who experience multiple brain injuries within a short period of time (hours, days, or weeks) may suffer catastrophic or fatal reactions related to SIS. Adolescents are particularly susceptible to the dangers of SIS, and current return-to-play guidelines may be too lenient to protect a student from SIS. Any student with signs of a concussion should receive medical evaluation and not be allowed to return to play in the current game or practice. The role of the school nurse includes being knowledgeable about management of head injuries and return-to-play guidelines, providing follow-up for athletes who have concussions, and providing education on prevention and management of head injuries.

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