Article

Backpropagating action potentials in neurones: measurement, mechanisms and potential functions

Abteilung Zellphysiologie, Max-Planck-Institut für medizinische Forschung, Jahnstrasse 29, Heidelberg D-69120, Germany.
Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology (Impact Factor: 3.38). 02/2005; 87(1):145-70. DOI: 10.1016/j.pbiomolbio.2004.06.009
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Here we review some properties and functions of backpropagating action potentials in the dendrites of mammalian CNS neurones. We focus on three main aspects: firstly the current techniques available for measuring backpropagating action potentials, secondly the morphological parameters and voltage gated ion channels that determine action potential backpropagation and thirdly the potential functions of backpropagating action potentials in real neuronal networks.

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Available from: Andreas T Schaefer, Feb 06, 2015
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    • "In our previous work (Cellot et al., 2009), we have shown that the conductivity of carbon nanotubes, together with their direct junctions to neurons, favor the generation of back-propagating APs which in turn may contribute to synaptic dynamics. Backpropagating APs are involved in spike-time-dependent plasticity (Markram et al., 1997; Dan and Poo, 2004), in the regulation of local synaptic feedback, and in the Ca 2ϩ -dependent release of messengers, ultimately controlling activity-dependent changes in synaptic efficacy (Waters et al., 2005; Zilberter et al., 2005; Kuczewski et al., 2008). In principle, promoting the "
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