Article

The prevalence of abnormal glucose regulation in patients with coronary artery disease across Europe - The Euro Heart Survey on diabetes and the heart

Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam, Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
European Heart Journal (Impact Factor: 14.72). 12/2004; 25(21):1880-90. DOI: 10.1016/j.ehj.2004.07.027
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The objective behind the Euro Heart Survey on diabetes and the heart was to study the prevalence of abnormal glucose regulation in adult patients with coronary artery disease (CAD).
The survey engaged 110 centres in 25 countries recruiting 4196 patients referred to a cardiologist due to CAD out of whom 2107 were admitted on an acute basis and 2854 had an elective consultation. Patient data were collected via a web-based case record form. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was used for the characterisation of the glucose metabolism. Thirty-one per cent of the patients had diabetes. An OGTT was performed on the 1920 patients without known diabetes, of whom 923 had acute and 997 had a stable manifestation of CAD, respectively. In patients with acute CAD, 36% had impaired glucose regulation and 22% newly detected diabetes. In the stable group these proportions were 37% and 14%.
This survey demonstrates that normal glucose regulation is less common than abnormal glucose regulation in patients with CAD. OGTT easily discloses the glucometabolic state and should be a routine procedure. The knowledge of glucometabolic state among these patients should influence their future management because it has great potential to improve the outcome.

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