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Available from: Miki Asano, Jul 15, 2014
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    ABSTRACT: We introduce a simple classification of the non-coronary sinus of Valsalva aneurysm, and suggest a different approach for the corresponding type of non-coronary sinus of Valsalva aneurysm. Between October 1996 and December 2009, 45 patients with non-coronary sinus of Valsalva aneurysm underwent surgical repair. Twenty-three were male and 22 female. The mean age was 32.80±11.77 years (range, 13-67 years). We divided them into two types, type I: rupture or protrusion into right atrium; and type II: rupture or protrusion into right atrium or right ventricle near or at the tricuspid annulus. For type I (n=32), the right atrium approach was chosen, using direct suture with patch repair. For type II (n=13), the transaortic approach with right atrium incision was chosen, with patch repair through an aortic incision and direct suture through a right atrium incision. Surgical results between types I and II were compared as regards cardiopulmonary bypass time, clamp aorta time, mechanical ventilation time, and intensive care unit time, and postoperative stay time. There was no early death after operation. There were no significant differences in cardiopulmonary bypass time, mechanical ventilation time, intensive care unit time, and postoperative stay time between two types (p>0.05). There was significant difference in clamp aorta time, with type II being longer than type I (p<0.05). Forty-three patients (93.33%) were followed up; one case of coronary artery disease using medication occurred, and there was no late death. Approach through the right atrium or right atrium with aortotomy showed the same early surgical results. Our classification of non-coronary SVA is simple and practical for clinical usage.
    European journal of cardio-thoracic surgery: official journal of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery 03/2011; 40(5):1047-51. DOI:10.1016/j.ejcts.2011.02.012 · 2.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We reviewed our experience with congenital ruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysms (RSVA) to determine risk factors influencing occurrence and postoperative worsening of aortic regurgitation (AR). Over an 11-year period, 210 patients (33 ± 9.7 years old) underwent surgical repair of RSVA. Aneurysm originated from the right noncoronary sinus and other sinuses in 171, 35 and 4 patients, respectively; and ruptured into right ventricle outlet tract in 115 patients, right ventricle in 16, right atrium in 75, and other chambers in 4. Aortic regurgitation (111) and ventricular septal defect (108) were common coexisting anomalies. Patch closure of RSVA was performed in 61 patients, direct sutures in 18 patients, patch closure plus direct sutures in 88 patients, and repair simultaneous with aortic valve replacement in 43 patients. All but one patient survived the operation. In early postoperative periods, AR improved in 26 patients and worsened in 23. In 114 late follow-up patients with echocardiographic assessment, 18 showed deteriorated AR. By logistic regression analysis, RSVA ruptured into the right ventricle outlet tract and secondary changes of the aortic valve were risk factors for preoperative AR, and RSVA repaired with direct sutures had a significantly higher incidence of early worsening of AR. By Cox regression analysis, AR at discharge was an independent risk factor for late follow-up AR worsening. The RSVA can be repaired with a low mortality and excellent long-term result. An early, aggressive treatment should be recommended to prevent postoperative AR, and a direct-suture closure of RSVA should be avoided to prevent early worsening of AR.
    The Annals of thoracic surgery 02/2011; 91(2):542-8. DOI:10.1016/j.athoracsur.2010.07.076 · 3.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The classification system of Sakakibara and Konno for sinus of Valsalva aneurysm (SVA) is highly complex and seldom utilized in clinical practice. In this study, we propose a new and simple classification system; we suggest a novel approach that utilizes four distinct types of SVAs. METHODS: We retrospectively studied 257 cases of SVAs in which surgical repair was performed between October 1996 and December 2009 and divided these cases into four types: I, rupture or protrusion into the right atrium; II, rupture or protrusion into the right atrium or right ventricle near or at the tricuspid annulus; III, rupture or protrusion into the right ventricular outflow tract under pulmonary valve and IV, others. The surgical results of the different approaches in each respective type were compared as follows: cardiopulmonary bypass time, clamp aorta time, mechanical ventilation time, intensive care unit time and postoperative stay time. RESULTS: In all the patients, there was no early postoperative death; all the patients recovered and were discharged as expected. There were no significant differences in intensive care unit time and postoperative stay time among different approaches in each type (P > 0.05). Two hundred and thirty-eight (92.61%) patients were followed up. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical repair of SVAs exhibited good long-term results. Our classification of SVA could be potentially helpful for surgical practice. For Type I, the right atrium approach is advised; for Type II, the transaortic approach with a right atrium incision is advised; for Type III, the transaortic approach with pulmonary incision is advised while for Type IV, repair according to the respective situation is advisable.
    European journal of cardio-thoracic surgery: official journal of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery 01/2013; 43(6). DOI:10.1093/ejcts/ezs673 · 2.81 Impact Factor