Article

A prospective study of fruit and vegetable intake and the risk of type 2 diabetes in women

Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
Diabetes Care (Impact Factor: 8.57). 01/2005; 27(12):2993-6. DOI: 10.2337/diacare.27.12.2993
Source: PubMed
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  • American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 06/2014; 99(6):1510-1519. DOI:10.3945/ajcn.113.082024 · 6.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To clarify and quantify the potential dose–response association between the intake of fruit and vegetables and risk of type 2 diabetes. Design Meta-analysis and systematic review of prospective cohort studies. Data source Studies published before February 2014 identified through electronic searches using PubMed and Embase. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Prospective cohort studies with relative risks and 95% CIs for type 2 diabetes according to the intake of fruit, vegetables, or fruit and vegetables. Results A total of 10 articles including 13 comparisons with 24 013 cases of type 2 diabetes and 434 342 participants were included in the meta-analysis. Evidence of curve linear associations was seen between fruit and green leafy vegetables consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes (p=0.059 and p=0.036 for non-linearity, respectively). The summary relative risk of type 2 diabetes for an increase of 1 serving fruit consumed/day was 0.93 (95% CI 0.88 to 0.99) without heterogeneity among studies (p=0.477, I2=0%). For vegetables, the combined relative risk of type 2 diabetes for an increase of 1 serving consumed/day was 0.90 (95% CI 0.80 to 1.01) with moderate heterogeneity among studies (p=0.002, I2=66.5%). For green leafy vegetables, the summary relative risk of type 2 diabetes for an increase of 0.2 serving consumed/day was 0.87 (95% CI 0.81 to 0.93) without heterogeneity among studies (p=0.496, I2=0%). The combined estimates showed no significant benefits of increasing the consumption of fruit and vegetables combined. Conclusions Higher fruit or green leafy vegetables intake is associated with a significantly reduced risk of type 2 diabetes.
    BMJ Open 11/2014; 4(11):e005497. DOI:10.1136/bmjopen-2014-005497 · 2.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background and Aims We conducted a dose–response meta-analysis to summarize the evidence from prospective cohort studies regarding the association of fruit and vegetable consumption with risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods and Results Pertinent studies were identified by searching Embase and PubMed through June 2014. Study-specific results were pooled using a random-effect model. The dose–response relationship was assessed by the restricted cubic spline model and the multivariate random-effect meta-regression. We standardized all data using a standard portion size of 106 g. The Relative Risk (95% confidence interval) [RR (95%CI)] of T2DM was 0.99 (0.98-1.00) for every 1 serving/day increment in fruit and vegetable (FV) (P=0.18), 0.98 (0.95-1.01) for vegetable (P=0.12), and 0.99 (0.97-1.00) for fruit (P=0.05). The RR (95%CI) of T2DM was 0.99 (0.97-1.01), 0.98 (0.96-1.01), 0.97 (0.93-1.01), 0.96 (0.92-1.01), 0.96 (0.91-1.01) and 0.96 (0.91-1.01) for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 servings/day of FV (Pfor non-linearity=0.44). The T2DM risk was 0.96 (0.95-0.99), 0.94 (0.90-0.98), 0.94 (0.89-0.98), 0.96 (0.91-1.01), 0.98 (0.92-1.05) and 1.00 (0.93-1.08) for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 servings/day of vegetable (Pfor non-linearity<0.01). The T2DM risk was 0.95 (0.93-0.97), 0.91 (0.89-0.94), 0.88 (0.85-0.92), 0.92 (0.88-0.96) and 0.96 (0.92-1.01) for 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 4 servings/day of fruit (Pfor non-linearity<0.01). Conclusions 2-3 servings/day of vegetable and 2 servings/day of fruit conferred a lower risk of T2DM than other levels of vegetable and fruit consumption, respectively.
    Nutrition Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases 10/2014; 25(2). DOI:10.1016/j.numecd.2014.10.004 · 3.88 Impact Factor

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