Minimum fifteen-year follow-up of Neer hemiarthroplasty and total shoulder arthroplasty in patients aged fifty years or younger. J Shoulder Elbow Surg 13: 604-613

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.
Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery (Impact Factor: 2.29). 11/2004; 13(6):604-13. DOI: 10.1016/S1058274604001296
Source: PubMed


Seventy-eight Neer hemiarthroplasties and thirty-six Neer total shoulder arthroplasties were performed in patients aged 50 years or younger between January 1, 1976, and December 31, 1985. Sixty-two hemiarthroplasties and twenty-nine total shoulder arthroplasties with complete preoperative evaluation, operative records, and a minimum 15-year follow-up (mean, 16.8 years) or follow-up until revision were included in the clinical analysis. Sixteen patients died, and seven were lost to follow-up. All 114 shoulders were included in the survival analysis. There was significant long-term pain relief (P < .01) and improvement in active abduction (P < .01) and external rotation (P < .01) with both procedures. There was not a significant difference between total shoulder arthroplasty and hemiarthroplasty with regard to pain relief, abduction, or external rotation. Radiographs were available for 53 hemiarthroplasties and 25 total shoulder arthroplasties with a minimum 10-year follow-up. Humeral periprosthetic lucency was present more frequently after total shoulder arthroplasty (60%) compared with hemiarthroplasty (34%) (P = .0079). Glenoid erosion was present in 38 of 53 hemiarthroplasties (72%). Glenoid periprosthetic lucency was present in 19 of 25 total shoulder arthroplasties (76%). The results were graded by use of a modified Neer result rating system. Among the hemiarthroplasties, there were 6 excellent (10%), 19 satisfactory (30%), and 37 unsatisfactory results (60%). Among total shoulder arthroplasties, there were 6 excellent (21%), 9 satisfactory (31%), and 14 unsatisfactory results (48%). The estimated survival rate for hemiarthroplasty was 82% (95% CI, 74%-92%) at 10 years and 75% (95% CI, 64%-86%) at 20 years. The estimated survival rate for total shoulder arthroplasty was 97% (95% CI, 91%-100%) at 10 years and 84% (95% CI, 68%-98%) at 20 years. The data from this study indicate that there is marked long-term pain relief and improvement in motion with shoulder arthroplasty. However, there is a moderate rate of hemiarthroplasty revision for painful glenoid arthritis. Unsatisfactory result ratings were most commonly a result of motion restriction from soft-tissue abnormalities. Great care must be exercised, and alternative methods of treatment considered, before either hemiarthroplasty or total shoulder arthroplasty is offered to patients aged 50 years or younger.

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    • "Thus, the authors concluded that revision of a TSA with re-implantation of an all-PE cemented glenoid component does not solve the problem of glenoid loosening with bone loss. Both hemiarthroplasty and resection arthroplasty have been indicated for failed TSA and associated with poor functional outcomes and patient satisfaction in the literature.[1120212223] In our first patient, there was massive glenoid bone loss and metallosis associated with the metal-backed glenoids. "
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    ABSTRACT: Total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) is successful in providing pain relief and functional improvements for patients with shoulder arthritis. Outcomes are directly correlated with implant position and fixation, which ultimately affects wear and longevity. Metal-backed glenoid components were introduced as an alternative to the standard cemented glenoid fixation. Early loosening and cavitary glenoid bone loss has been reported as a major complication associated with these metal-backed glenoids, which presents the surgeon with a challenging revision situation. Furthermore, failure of bilateral TSA in patients with metal-backed glenoids is extremely rare. We present two patients with early failure of bilateral TSA secondary to loosening of the metal-backed glenoids. Both patients had significant glenoid bone loss and were treated with four different types of revision techniques. A description of treatments and outcomes of both patients are reported along with the simple shoulder test and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores. One patient underwent revision to bilateral reverse prosthesis and experienced a much-improved outcome in comparison to the patient revised to a hemiarthroplasty and resection arthroplasty, for each shoulder respectively. In patients who present with failed TSA, revision to a reverse prosthesis with or without staged glenoid bone graft should be considered as an option of treatment. It is also important to rule out infection with intraoperative tissue biopsy before proceeding to revision surgery. However, in patients with catastrophic glenoid bone loss, both hemiarthroplasty and resection arthroplasty can provide an alternative treatment option, but they are associated with a poorer functional outcome and pain relief.
    International Journal of Shoulder Surgery 10/2013; 7(4):143-148. DOI:10.4103/0973-6042.123527 · 0.65 Impact Factor
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    • "Sperling et al. [41] found that in spite of long-term improvements in pain relief and function after hemiarthroplasty, in patients under 50 years there was a 60% rate of unsatisfactory results. Several other studies have confirmed that long-term functional results appear to be compromised by progressive glenoid wear, especially in those individuals with preexisting asymmetric glenoid erosion [42]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent cause of disability in the USA, affecting up to 32.8% of patients over the age of sixty. Treatment of shoulder OA is often controversial and includes both nonoperative and surgical modalities. Nonoperative modalities should be utilized before operative treatment is considered, particularly for patients with mild-to-moderate OA or when pain and functional limitations are modest despite more advanced radiographic changes. If conservative options fail, surgical treatment should be considered. Although different surgical procedures are available, as in other joints affected by severe OA, the most effective treatment is joint arthroplasty. The aim of this work is to give an overview of the currently available treatments of shoulder OA.
    01/2013; 2013:370231. DOI:10.1155/2013/370231
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    • "For this particular diagnosis, total shoulder arthroplasty seems to be superior to hemiarthroplasty [24]. This was clearly shown in a prospective randomized study by Garstman et al. [25] and a long-term 15 year study by Sperling et al. [22]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Shoulder arthroplasty has been the subject of marked advances over the last few years. Modern implants provide a wide range of options, including resurfacing of the humeral head, anatomic hemiarthroplasty, total shoulder arthroplasty, reverse shoulder arthroplasty and trauma-specific implants for fractures and nonunions. Most humeral components achieve successful long-term fixation without bone cement. Cemented all-polyethylene glenoid components remain the standard for anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty. The results of shoulder arthroplasty vary depending on the underlying diagnosis, the condition of the soft-tissues, and the type of reconstruction. Total shoulder arthroplasty seems to provide the best outcome for patients with osteoarthritis and inflammatory arthropathy. The outcome of hemiarthroplasty for proximal humerus fractures is somewhat unpredictable, though it seems to have improved with the use of fracture-specific designs, more attention to tuberosity repair, and the selective use of reverse arthroplasty, as well as a shift in indications towards internal fixation. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty has become extremely popular for patients with cuff-tear arthropathy, and its indications have been expanded to the field of revision surgery. Overall, shoulder arthroplasty is a very successful procedure with predictable pain relief and substantial improvements in motion and function.
    The Open Orthopaedics Journal 03/2011; 5(1):106-14. DOI:10.2174/1874325001105010106
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