Article

Potential for conflict of interest in the evaluation of suspected adverse drug reactions: a counterpoint.

Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia 19104-6021, USA.
JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association (Impact Factor: 29.98). 01/2005; 292(21):2643-6. DOI: 10.1001/jama.292.21.2643
Source: PubMed
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