Article

A screening study of xylitol binding in vitro to activated charcoal

Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331, USA.
Veterinary and human toxicology 12/2004; 46(6):336-7.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Ingestion of foods containing the sweetener xylitol by dogs results in a significant, and often sustained, insulin-mediated hypoglycemic crisis. The efficacy of activated charcoal for gastrointestinal decontamination following xylitol ingestion is unknown. This screening study examined the effect of pH and incubation time on the in vitro binding of xylitol to activated charcoal. The mean percentage activated charcoal binding ranged between 8 and 23%. Mean percentage binding of xylitol at pH 3 was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than the binding of xylitol at pH 1 or pH 5 following 40 or 60 min of incubation with an aQueous 200 g/L activated charcoal slurry. These results suggest binding of xylitol to activated charcoal is relatively low; however, activated charcoal administration may still be beneficial in some canine acute oral xylitol exposures.

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    • "administration of fluids; plasma transfusions; and, if indicated, administration of dextrose. Cope (2004) revealed that binding of xylitol to activated charcoal is relatively low; however, activated charcoal administration may still be beneficial in some canine acute oral xylitol exposures. "
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