Article

The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): from genes to mice--a community resource for mouse biology.

The Jackson Laboratory, 600 Main Street, Bar Harbor, ME 04609, USA.
Nucleic Acids Research (Impact Factor: 8.81). 02/2005; 33(Database issue):D471-5. DOI: 10.1093/nar/gki113
Source: DBLP

ABSTRACT The Mouse Genome Database (MGD) forms the core of the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) system (http://www.informatics.jax.org), a model organism database resource for the laboratory mouse. MGD provides essential integration of experimental knowledge for the mouse system with information annotated from both literature and online sources. MGD curates and presents consensus and experimental data representations of genotype (sequence) through phenotype information, including highly detailed reports about genes and gene products. Primary foci of integration are through representations of relationships among genes, sequences and phenotypes. MGD collaborates with other bioinformatics groups to curate a definitive set of information about the laboratory mouse and to build and implement the data and semantic standards that are essential for comparative genome analysis. Recent improvements in MGD discussed here include the enhancement of phenotype resources, the re-development of the International Mouse Strain Resource, IMSR, the update of mammalian orthology datasets and the electronic publication of classic books in mouse genetics.

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