Article

Practice parameter: corticosteroid treatment of Duchenne dystrophy: report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the Practice Committee of the Child Neurology Society.

Department of Neurology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, NY, USA.
Neurology (Impact Factor: 8.3). 02/2005; 64(1):13-20. DOI: 10.1212/01.WNL.0000148485.00049.B7
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the Practice Committee of the Child Neurology Society develop practice parameters as strategies for patient management based on analysis of evidence.
To review available evidence on corticosteroid treatment of boys with Duchenne dystrophy.
Relevant literature was reviewed, abstracted, and classified. Recommendations were based on a four-tiered scheme of evidence classification, and areas for future research are defined.
Seven class I studies and numerous less rigorous trials all demonstrated that corticosteroid treatment for 6 months with prednisone (0.75 or 1.5 mg/kg/day) increased muscle strength, performance, and pulmonary function and significantly slowed the progression of weakness. Two class I trials examined the effect of lower dosage of prednisone (0.30 and 0.35 mg/kg/day), demonstrated lesser but similar benefits, and showed a lower frequency of side effects (e.g., weight gain). The only significant side effects in all class I trials were weight gain and development of a cushingoid facial appearance. One longer-term trial of daily prednisone (0.3 to 0.7 mg/kg/day), a class III study, showed prolongation of functional ability and slower progression of weakness in patients during 3 years of treatment. One class IV, open trial of alternate-day prednisone (2 mg/kg for 2 months, then two-thirds dose every other day) extended ambulation by approximately 2 years in treated compared with untreated patients. Deflazacort, a corticosteroid similar in structure to prednisone, produced similar improvement in muscle strength and function with a similar side effect profile.
Prednisone has been demonstrated to have a beneficial effect on muscle strength and function in boys with Duchenne dystrophy and should be offered (at a dose of 0.75 mg/kg/day) as treatment. If side effects require a decrease in prednisone, tapering to dosages as low as 0.3 mg/kg/day gives less robust but significant improvement. Deflazacort (0.9 mg/kg/day) can also be used for the treatment of Duchenne dystrophy in countries in which it is available. Benefits and side effects of corticosteroid therapy need to be monitored. The offer of treatment with corticosteroids should include a balanced discussion of potential risks.

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