Kearney, P. M. et al. Global burden of hypertension: analysis of worldwide data. Lancet 365, 217-223

Department of Epidemiology, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.
The Lancet (Impact Factor: 45.22). 01/2005; 365(9455):217-23. DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(05)17741-1
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Reliable information about the prevalence of hypertension in different world regions is essential to the development of national and international health policies for prevention and control of this condition. We aimed to pool data from different regions of the world to estimate the overall prevalence and absolute burden of hypertension in 2000, and to estimate the global burden in 2025.
We searched the published literature from Jan 1, 1980, to Dec 31, 2002, using MEDLINE, supplemented by a manual search of bibliographies of retrieved articles. We included studies that reported sex-specific and age-specific prevalence of hypertension in representative population samples. All data were obtained independently by two investigators with a standardised protocol and data-collection form.
Overall, 26.4% (95% CI 26.0-26.8%) of the adult population in 2000 had hypertension (26.6% of men [26.0-27.2%] and 26.1% of women [25.5-26.6%]), and 29.2% (28.8-29.7%) were projected to have this condition by 2025 (29.0% of men [28.6-29.4%] and 29.5% of women [29.1-29.9%]). The estimated total number of adults with hypertension in 2000 was 972 million (957-987 million); 333 million (329-336 million) in economically developed countries and 639 million (625-654 million) in economically developing countries. The number of adults with hypertension in 2025 was predicted to increase by about 60% to a total of 1.56 billion (1.54-1.58 billion).
Hypertension is an important public-health challenge worldwide. Prevention, detection, treatment, and control of this condition should receive high priority.

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Available from: Patricia M Kearney, Sep 27, 2015
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    • "Hypertension remains a global public health challenge. An estimated 26% of all adults worldwide have hypertension (Kearney et al., 2005). Hypertension is the primary cause of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and 13% of deaths are associated with CVD, 62% of strokes and 49% of ischemic heart disease events are attributable to raised blood pressure (WHO, 2002, 2011). "
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    • "It affects 972 million persons over the world, around one-quarter of the adult population. Among the affected persons, 639 million are living in the developing countries [1]. The arterial hypertension is a multifactorial disease with genetic, environmental, and behavioral determinants [2]. "
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