Article

Pediatric Fabry disease.

Developmental and Metabolic Neurology Branch, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Building 10, Room 3D03, Bethesda, MD 20892-1260, USA.
PEDIATRICS (Impact Factor: 5.3). 03/2005; 115(3):e344-55. DOI: 10.1542/peds.2004-1678
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Fabry disease is an underdiagnosed, treatable, X-linked, multisystem disorder.
To test the hypothesis that quality of life and sweating are decreased among pediatric patients with Fabry disease, compared with control subjects, and to provide quantitative natural history data and novel clinical end points for therapeutic trials.
Prospective, cross-sectional, observational study.
Referral to the National Institutes of Health.
Twenty-five male children with Fabry disease (mean age: 12.3 +/- 3.5 years) and 21 age-matched control subjects.
Quality of life (measured with the Child Health Questionnaire) and sweating (assessed with the quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test).
Quality of life scores for pediatric patients <10 years of age with Fabry disease, compared with published normative values, were 55 +/- 17 vs 83 +/- 19 for bodily pain and 62 +/- 19 vs 80 +/- 13 for mental health. Bodily pain scores for patients > or =10 years of age were 54 +/- 22 vs 74 +/- 23. Sweat volume in the Fabry disease group was 0.41 +/- 0.46 microL/mm2, compared with 0.65 +/- 0.44 microL/mm2 in the control group. Renal function, urinary protein excretion, and cardiac function and structure were normal for the majority of patients. The 3 patients with residual alpha-galactosidase A activity > or =1.5% of normal values were free of cornea verticillata and had normal serum and urinary globotriaosylceramide levels. All other children had glycolipid levels comparable to those of adult patients with Fabry disease. Acroparesthesia and cardiac abnormalities were generally present before anhidrosis and proteinuria. Mapping of the missense mutations on the crystallographic structure of alpha-galactosidase A revealed that the mutations were partially surface-exposed and distal to the active site among individuals with residual enzyme activity. Mutations associated with left ventricular hypertrophy (defined as left ventricular mass index of >51 g/m2.7) were localized near the catalytic site of the enzyme.
Despite the absence of major organ dysfunction, Fabry disease demonstrates significant morbidity already in childhood. We have identified important, potentially correctable or preventable, outcome measures for future therapeutic trials. Prevention of complications involving major organs should be the goal for long-term specific therapy.

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    Revista de nefrología, diálisis y transplante 01/2007; 27(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Fabry disease is an X-linked inherited metabolic condition where the deficit of the alpha-galactosidase A enzyme, encoded by the GLA gene, leads to glycosphingolipid storage, mainly globotriaosylceramide. To date, more than 600 mutations have been identified in human GLA gene that are responsible for FD, including missense and nonsense mutations, small and large deletions. Such mutations are usually inherited, and cases of de novo onset occur rarely. In this article we report an interesting case of a 44-year-old male patient suffering from a severe form of Fabry disease, with negative family history. The patient showed signs such as cornea verticillata, angiokeratomas, cardiac and neurological manifestations, an end-stage renal disease and he had low alpha-galactosidase A activity. We detected, in this subject, the mutation c.493 G > C in the third exon of the GLA gene which causes the amino acid substitution D165H in the protein. This mutation affects the amino acid - belonging to the group of buried residues - involved, probably, in the preservation of the protein folding. Moreover, studies of multiple sequence alignment indicate that this amino acid is highly conserved, thus strengthening the hypothesis that it is a key amino acid to the enzyme functionality.The study of the relatives of the patient showed that, surprisingly, none of the members of his family of origin had this genetic alteration, suggesting a de novo mutation. Only his 11-year-old daughter - showing acroparaesthesias and heat intolerance with reduced enzymatic activity - had the same mutation. We suggest that a non-inherited mutation of the alpha-galactosidase A gene is responsible for Fabry disease in the patient who had reduced enzyme activity and classical clinical manifestations of the disease. In a family, it is rare to find only one Fabry disease affected subject with a de novo mutation. These findings emphasize the importance of early diagnosis, genetic counselling, studying the genealogical tree of the patients and starting enzyme replacement therapy to prevent irreversible vital organ damage that occurs during the course of the disease.
    BMC Research Notes 01/2014; 7(1):11. DOI:10.1186/1756-0500-7-11
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    ABSTRACT: Fabry disease is an X-linked inborn error of glycolipid metabolism caused by deficiency of the human lysosomal enzyme, α-galactosidase A (αGal), leading to strokes, myocardial infarctions, and terminal renal failure, often leading to death in the fourth or fifth decade of life. The enzyme is responsible for the hydrolysis of terminal α-galactoside linkages in various glycolipids. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been approved for the treatment of Fabry disease, but adverse reactions, including immune reactions, make it desirable to generate improved methods for ERT. One approach to circumvent these adverse reactions is the development of derivatives of the enzyme with more activity per mg. It was previously reported that carboxyl-terminal deletions of 2 to 10 amino acids led to increased activity of about 2 to 6-fold. However, this data was qualitative or semi-quantitative and relied on comparison of the amounts of mRNA present in Northern blots with αGal enzyme activity using a transient expression system in COS-1 cells. Here we follow up on this report by constructing and purifying mutant enzymes with deletions of 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 C-terminal amino acids (Δ2, Δ4, Δ6, Δ8, Δ10) for unambiguous quantitative enzyme assays. The results reported here show that the kcat/Km approximately doubles with deletions of 2, 4, 6 and 10 amino acids (0.8 to 1.7-fold effect) while a deletion of 8 amino acids decreases the kcat/Km (7.2-fold effect). These results indicate that the mutated enzymes with increased activity constructed here would be expected to have a greater therapeutic effect on a per mg basis, and could therefore reduce the likelihood of adverse infusion related reactions in Fabry patients receiving ERT treatment. These results also illustrate the principle that in vitro mutagenesis can be used to generate αGal derivatives with improved enzyme activity.
    PLoS ONE 01/2015; 10(2):e0118341. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0118341 · 3.53 Impact Factor

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Markus Ries