Article

Transmembrane delivery of protein and peptide drugs by TAT-mediated transduction in the treatment of cancer.

Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of California San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, California 92093-0686, USA.
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews (Impact Factor: 12.89). 03/2005; 57(4):579-96. DOI: 10.1016/j.addr.2004.10.005
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The direct intracellular delivery of proteins, or active peptide domains, has, until recently, been difficult to achieve due primarily to the bioavailability barrier of the plasma membrane, which effectively prevents the uptake of macromolecules by limiting their passive entry. Traditional approaches to modulate protein function have largely relied on the serendipitous discovery of specific drugs and small molecules which could be delivered easily into the cell. However, the usefulness of these pharmacological agents is limited by their tissue distribution and unlike 'information-rich' macromolecules, they often suffer from poor target specificity, unwanted side-effects, and toxicity. Likewise, the development of molecular techniques, over the past several decades, for gene delivery and expression of proteins has provided for tremendous advances in our understanding of cellular processes but has been of surprisingly little benefit for the management of genetic disorders. Apart from these gains however, the transfer of genetic material into eukaryotic cells either using viral vectors or by non-viral mechanisms such as microinjection, electroporation, or chemical transfection remains problematic. Moreover, in vivo, gene therapy approaches relying on adenoviral vectors are associated with significant difficulties relating to a lack of target specificity and toxicity which have contributed to poor performance in several clinical trials. Remarkably, the recent identification of a particular group of proteins with enhanced ability to cross the plasma membrane in a receptor-independent fashion has led to the discovery of a class of protein domains with cell membrane penetrating properties. The fusion of these protein transduction domain peptide sequences with heterologous proteins is sufficient to cause their rapid transduction into a variety of different cells in a rapid, concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, this novel technique for protein and peptide delivery appears to circumvent many problems associated with DNA and drug based methods. This technique may represent the next paradigm in our ability to modulate cell function and offers a unique avenue for the treatment of disease.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
176 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background In Huntington¿s disease (HD), the ratio between normal and mutant Huntingtin (polyQ-hHtt) is crucial in the onset and progression of the disease. As a result, addition of normal Htt was shown to improve polyQ-hHtt-induced defects. Therefore, we recently identified, within human Htt, a 23aa peptide (P42) that prevents aggregation and polyQ-hHtt-induced phenotypes in HD Drosophila model. In this report, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of P42 in a mammalian model of the disease, R6/2 mice.ResultsTo this end, we developed an original strategy for P42 delivery, combining the properties of the cell penetrating peptide TAT from HIV with a nanostructure-based drug delivery system (Aonys® technology), to form a water-in-oil microemulsion (referred to as NP42T) allowing non-invasive per mucosal buccal/rectal administration of P42. Using MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry, we verified the correct targeting of NP42T into the brain, after per mucosal administration. We then evaluated the effects of NP42T in R6/2 mice. We found that P42 (and/or derivatives) are delivered into the brain and target most of the cells, including the neurons of the striatum. Buccal/rectal daily administrations of NP42T microemulsion allowed a clear improvement of behavioural HD-associated defects (foot-clasping, rotarod and body weights), and of several histological markers (aggregation, astrogliosis or ventricular areas) recorded on brain sections.Conclusions These data demonstrate that NP42T presents an unprecedented protective effect, and highlight a new therapeutic strategy for HD, associating an efficient peptide with a powerful delivery technology.
    Acta neuropathologica communications. 08/2014; 2(1):86.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: It is an attractive strategy to develop a recombinant bacterial vector vaccine by expressing exogenous protective antigen to induce the immune response, and the main concern is how to enhance the cellular internalization of antigen produced by bacterial vector. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short cationic/amphipathic peptides which facilitate cellular uptake of various molecular cargoes and therefore have great potentials in vector vaccine design. In this work, eleven different CPPs were fused to the C-terminus of EGFP respectively, and the resultant EGFP-CPP fusion proteins were expressed and purified to assay their cross-membrane transport in macrophage J774 A.1 cells. Among the tested CPPs, TAT showed an excellent capability to deliver the cargo protein EGFP into cytoplasm. In order to establish an efficient antigen delivery system in Escherichia coli, the EGFP-TAT synthesis circuit was combined with an in vivo inducible lysis circuit PviuA-E in E. coli to form an integrated antigen delivery system, the resultant E. coli was proved to be able to lyse upon the induction of a mimic in vivo signal and thus release intracellular EGFP-TAT intensively, which were assumed to undergo a more efficient intracellular delivery by CPP to evoke protective immune responses. Based on the established antigen delivery system, the protective antigen gene flgD from an invasive intracellular fish pathogen Edwardsiella tarda EIB202, was applied to establish an E. coli recombinant vector vaccine. This E. coli vector vaccine presented superior immune protection (RPS = 63%) under the challenge with E. tarda EIB202, suggesting that the novel antigen delivery system had great potential in bacterial vector vaccine applications.
    Fish &amp Shellfish Immunology 04/2014; · 2.96 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Lyophilisomes are a novel class of biodegradable proteinaceous nano/micrometer capsules with potential use as drug delivery carrier. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) including the TAT peptide have been successfully implemented for intracellular delivery of a broad variety of cargos including various nanoparticulate pharmaceutical carriers. In the present study, lyophilisomes were modified using CPPs in order to achieve enhanced cellular uptake. Lyophilisomes were prepared by a freezing, annealing, and lyophilization method and a cystein-elongated TAT peptide was conjugated to the lyophilisomes using a heterobifunctional linker. Fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS) was utilized to acquire a lyophilisome population with a particle diameter smaller than 1000 nm. Cultured HeLa, OVCAR-3, Caco-2 and SKOV-3 cells were exposed to unmodified lyophilisomes and TAT-conjugated lyophilisomes and examined with FACS. HeLa cells were investigated in more detail using a trypan blue quenching assay, confocal microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. TAT-conjugation strongly increased binding and cellular uptake of lyophilisomes in a time-dependent manner in vitro, as assessed by FACS. These results were confirmed by confocal microscopy. Transmission electron microscopy indicated rapid cellular uptake of TAT-conjugated lyophilisomes via phagocytosis and/or macropinocytosis. In conclusion, TAT-peptides conjugated to albumin-based lyophilisomes are able to enhance cellular uptake of lyophilisomes in HeLa cells.
    PLoS ONE 01/2014; 9(11):e110813. · 3.53 Impact Factor