Consumption of a high calcium mineral water lowers biochemical indices of bone remodeling in postmenopausal women with low calcium intake

Faculty of Medicine RTH, Laennec INSERM Unit 403, rue G. Paradin, 69372 Lyon Cedex 08, France.
Osteoporosis International (Impact Factor: 4.17). 11/2005; 16(10):1203-9. DOI: 10.1007/s00198-004-1828-6
Source: PubMed


Many postmenopausal women have a calcium intake far below the recommended amount and, in addition to attempting to improve their diet, need a calcium supplement. The aim of the study was to assess the effects of the consumption of a high calcium mineral water (HCaMW) on biochemical indices of bone remodeling in postmenopausal women with low Ca intake. A 6-month randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial was designed to assess the effects of a daily consumption of 1 liter of a HCaMW (596 mg Ca/l) on serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and biochemical markers of bone remodeling in postmenopausal women with a dietary Ca intake lower than 700 mg/day. The placebo group drank 1 liter of a mineral water with a low calcium content (10 mg/l). One hundred eighty healthy women were recruited (mean age: 70.1+/-4.0 years); 152 completed the 6-month trial. The changes from baseline of biochemical indices after 6 months consisted of a significant 14.1% decrease of serum PTH, osteocalcin (-8.6%), bone alkaline phosphatase (-11.5%), serum (-16.3%) and urine (-13.0%) type-1 collagen C-telopeptide in the HCaMW group compared to the placebo group, where all biochemical indices increased after 6 months. The additive effect of a small vitamin D supplement (400 iu/day) was also evaluated. In women receiving vitamin D in addition to HCaMW, the decrease in bone indices was not found to be greater than in women drinking only the HCaMW. A daily supplement of 596 mg of Ca through the consumption of 1 l of HCaMW was able to lower serum PTH and the indices of bone turnover in postmenopausal women with a low Ca intake. This could contribute to the repair of calcium deficiency and to the reduction of age-related bone loss in this population.

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Available from: Viviane de La Guéronnière, Jul 23, 2014
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    • "On the other hand, when including magnesium in a statistical model with calcium and other covariates, an increased risk of hip fracture with high calcium was observed in women. Previous studies on calcium in drinking water and bone health performed in other countries have found a protective effect of high calcium mineral waters on bone formation [17] [18] [19]. Yet, the effect of calcium on hip fracture risk is debated. "
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    ABSTRACT: Norway has a high incidence of hip fractures, and the incidence varies by degree of urbanization. This variation may reflect a difference in underlying environmental factors, perhaps variations in the concentration of calcium and magnesium in municipal drinking water. A trace metals survey (1986-1991) in 556 waterworks (supplying 64% of the Norwegian population) was linked geographically to hip fractures from hospitals throughout the country (1994-2000). In all, 5,472 men and 13,604 women aged 50-85 years suffered a hip fracture. Poisson regression models were fitted, adjusting for age, urbanization degree, region of residence, type of water source, and pH. The concentrations of calcium and magnesium in drinking water were generally low. An inverse association was found between concentration of magnesium and risk of hip fracture in both genders (IRR men highest vs. lowest tertile= 0.80, 95% CI: 0.74, 0.87; IRR women highest vs. lowest tertile= 0.90, 95% CI: 0.85, 0.95), but no consistent association between calcium and hip fracture risk was observed. The highest tertile of urbanization degree (city), compared to the lowest (rural), was related to a 23 and 24 percent increase in hip fracture risk in men and women, respectively. The association between magnesium and hip fracture did not explain the variation in hip fracture risk between city and rural areas. Magnesium in drinking water may have a protective role against hip fractures; however this association should be further investigated.
    Bone 07/2013; 57(1). DOI:10.1016/j.bone.2013.06.017 · 3.97 Impact Factor
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    • "It is likely that the level of 650 mg/L bicarbonate in the present study was too low to elicit an effect on bone metabolic and cardiovascular parameters over a short period. In addition, the consumption of a high calcium mineral water has shown that bone modelling parameters were only affected when the study population had low dietary mineral intakes [26]. "
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    ABSTRACT: A number of health benefits including improvements in acid/base balance, bone metabolism, and cardiovascular risk factors have been attributed to the intake of magnesium rich alkaline mineral water. This study was designed to investigate the effects of the regular consumption of magnesium bicarbonate supplemented spring water on pH, biochemical parameters of bone metabolism, lipid profile and blood pressure in postmenopausal women. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, study, 67 postmenopausal women were randomised to receive between 1500 mL and 1800 mL daily of magnesium bicarbonate supplemented spring water (650 mg/L bicarbonate, 120 mg/L magnesium, pH 8.3-8.5) (supplemented water group) or spring water without supplements (control water group) over 84 days. Over this period biomarkers of bone turnover (serum parathyroid hormone (PTH), 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, osteocalcin, urinary telopeptides and hydroxyproline), serum lipids (total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides), venous and urinary pH were measured together with measurements of standard biochemistry, haematology and urine examinations.Serum magnesium concentrations and urinary pH in subjects consuming the magnesium bicarbonate supplemented water increased significantly at Day 84 compared to subjects consuming the spring water control (magnesium - p = 0.03; pH - p = 0.018). The consumption of spring water led to a trend for an increase in parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations while the PTH concentrations remained stable with the intake of the supplemented spring water. However there were no significant effects of magnesium bicarbonate supplementation in changes to biomarkers of bone mineral metabolism (n-telopeptides, hydroxyproline, osteocalcin and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D) or serum lipids or blood pressure in postmenopausal women from Day 0 to Day 84. Short term regular ingestion of magnesium bicarbonate supplemented water provides a source of orally available magnesium. Long term clinical studies are required to investigate any health benefits. ACTRN12609000863235.
    BMC Research Notes 06/2010; 3(1):180. DOI:10.1186/1756-0500-3-180
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    • "Discussion A 4-week dietetic intervention with 1.5 daily litres of calcium-rich mineral waters showed that additional bicarbonate enhances inhibition of bone resorption. The effect of calcium-rich mineral water on bone resorption has already been shown, but in postmenopausal, calcium-deficient women [3] [23]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Dietary acid charge enhances bone loss. Bicarbonate or alkali diet decreases bone resorption in humans. We compared the effect of an alkaline mineral water, rich in bicarbonate, with that of an acid one, rich in calcium only, on bone markers, in young women with a normal calcium intake. This study compared water A (per litre: 520 mg Ca, 291 mg HCO(3)(-), 1160 mg SO(4)(-), Potential Renal Acid load (PRAL) +9.2 mEq) with water B (per litre: 547 mg Ca, 2172 mg HCO(3)(-), 9 mg SO(4)(-), PRAL -11.2 mEq). 30 female dieticians aged 26.3 yrs (SD 7.3) were randomized into two groups, followed an identical weighed, balanced diet (965 mg Ca) and drank 1.5 l/d of the assigned water. Changes in blood and urine electrolytes, C-telopeptides (CTX), urinary pH and bicarbonate, and serum PTH were measured after 2 and 4 weeks. The two groups were not different at baseline, and showed a similar increase in urinary calcium excretion. Urinary pH and bicarbonate excretion increased with water B, but not with water A. PTH (p=0.022) and S-CTX (p=0.023) decreased with water B but not with water A. In calcium sufficiency, the acid calcium-rich water had no effect on bone resorption, while the alkaline water rich in bicarbonate led to a significant decrease of PTH and of S-CTX.
    Bone 10/2008; 44(1):120-4. DOI:10.1016/j.bone.2008.09.007 · 3.97 Impact Factor
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