Article

Everson-Rose SA, Lewis TT. Psychosocial factors and cardiovascular diseases

Department of Preventive Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois 60612, USA.
Annual Review of Public Health (Impact Factor: 6.63). 02/2005; 26(1):469-500. DOI: 10.1146/annurev.publhealth.26.021304.144542
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Rapidly accruing evidence from a diversity of disciplines supports the hypothesis that psychosocial factors are related to morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular diseases. We review relevant literature on (a) negative emotional states, including depression, anger and hostility, and anxiety; (b) chronic and acute psychosocial stressors; and (c) social ties, social support, and social conflict. All three of these psychosocial domains have been significantly associated with increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We also discuss critical pathophysiological mechanisms and pathways that likely operate in a synergistic and integrative way to promote atherogenesis and related clinical manifestations. We conclude by discussing some of the important challenges and opportunities for future investigations.

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    • "Adicionalmente, la depresión también está asociada con una disfunción serotoninérgica en el sistema nervioso central y en las plaquetas periféricas circulantes (Paz-Filho et al., 2010). Esto es importante teniendo en cuenta que los mecanismos central y periféricos serotoninérgicos influencian los procesos trombovasculares (Everson & Lewis, 2005). "
    • "Adicionalmente, la depresión también está asociada con una disfunción serotoninérgica en el sistema nervioso central y en las plaquetas periféricas circulantes (Paz-Filho et al., 2010). Esto es importante teniendo en cuenta que los mecanismos central y periféricos serotoninérgicos influencian los procesos trombovasculares (Everson & Lewis, 2005). "
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    ABSTRACT: Studies have found a strong association between depressive symptoms and major depression and cardiac morbidity and mortality increased after acute coronary syndrome (ACS); however it has also been reported evidence against this association. This difference in results may explain why depression has not yet been accepted by the American Heart Association as a risk factor for poor prognosis in patients with CVD. In this article depression is discussed as a risk factor of poor prognosis in patients who have had ACS and the factors that may influence the divergence of results in the studies. Our conclusions show that depression is related with a worse prognosis in ACS patients specifically when the symptomatology occurred after the event or when it is a treatment-resistant disorder. Cognitive and somatic symptoms and also comorbid anxiety are bad prognosis indicators. Resumen Numerosos estudios han encontrado una asociación robusta entre los síntomas depresivos o la depresión mayor y un incremento en la morbilidad y la mortalidad cardiaca posterior a un síndrome coronario agudo (SCA); sin embargo, también se ha reportado evidencia en contra. Debido a esta divergencia, la depresión aún no ha sido aceptada por la Asociación Americana del Corazón como un factor de riesgo para un mal pronóstico en pacientes con enfermedades cardiovasculares. En este artículo se aborda el tema de la depresión en pacientes que han tenido un SCA y los factores que pueden influir en la divergencia de los resultados mencionada. Se concluye que la depresión se relaciona con un peor pronóstico en estos pacientes, específicamente cuando su presencia es posterior al evento o se trata de un cuadro resistente al tratamiento. Los síntomas cognitivos y somáticos son indicadores de mal pronóstico, así como la presencia de ansiedad comórbida.
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    • "The approach has recently been extended to understand why people who are more socially connected have better health (e.g., see Berkman & Syme, 1979; Boden-Albala et al., 2005, Everson-Rose & Lewis, 2005; House, Landis, & Umberson, 1988). Here it is argued that membership in self-defining social groups (e.g., those defined by family, work, community, sport, religion) is key to gaining health benefits (Haslam et al., 2008; Jetten, Haslam, Iyer & Haslam, 2009; Jetten & Pachana, 2011). "
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    ABSTRACT: Maintenance of well-being is recognised as important for well-being in residential care, but the particular contribution that social groups and group activities make in this context is rarely considered. To understand how we can foster well-being in care, this study explores (a) older adults’ general experiences of life in long-term residential care, and (b) their particular experiences of participation in this group intervention. Ten semi-structured interviews were conducted with long-term care home residents and interview transcripts were analysed thematically. Thematic Analysis revealed two over-riding themes that illustrated participants’ general experiences of life in care. The first theme, ‘care home as home’, suggested that adjustment and positive social relations with carers play a role in enhancing well-being. The second theme, ‘being stuck’, described a general sense of confinement and a lack of control associated with living in long-term care. The significance of collective engagement became evident in relation to this second theme. Specifically, participants’ involvement in the group activity considered here was experienced as making a positive contribution to building social relations with other residents and, in doing so, as reducing residents’ sense of confinement and lack of control. Engagement in the group intervention and the resulting positive social relationships were thus experienced as a means of counteracting participants’ sense of ‘being stuck’. Overall, the findings point to the importance of group activities in fostering older adults’ autonomy and control – and thus well-being – in care.
    Activities Adaptation & Aging 12/2014; 38(4):259-280. DOI:10.1080/01924788.2014.966542
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