Article

Clinical and radiological features of central giant-cell lesions of the jaw

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Academic Medical Center and Academic Center for Dentistry (ACTA), University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1100 DD Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontology (Impact Factor: 1.46). 05/2005; 99(4):464-70. DOI: 10.1016/j.tripleo.2004.11.015
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological features of central giant-cell lesions that were diagnosed in The Netherlands between January 1, 1990, and January 1, 1995.
A population-based retrospective study was carried out, examining all patients with a central giant-cell lesion from this period.
In 83 patients there was a central giant-cell granuloma (89 lesions). Aggressive signs and symptoms (pain, paresthesia, or root resorption) were found in 16 (19.3%) patients. Multiple lesions occurred in 3 (3.6%) patients. The overall recurrence rate was 26.3%, and there was a higher recurrence rate in patients who exhibited aggressive signs and symptoms than in patients without these features (RR 1.6). In 5 patients a clinical diagnosis of cherubism or concomitant neurofibromatosis type 1 was made (14 lesions).
In a general population, large and aggressive lesions are less common than suggested by the literature. Multiple lesions, however, occur more frequently than previously assumed. In patients with aggressive signs and symptoms, surgical curettage is not an effective therapy.

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