Article

Role of molecular mimicry to HIV-1 peptides in HIV-1-related immunologic thrombocytopenia.

New York University School of Medicine, 550 First Ave, New York, NY 10016, USA.
Blood (Impact Factor: 9.78). 08/2005; 106(2):572-6. DOI: 10.1182/blood-2005-01-0243
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Patients with early HIV-1 infection develop an autoimmune thrombocytopenia in which antibody is directed against an immunodominant epitope of the beta3 (glycoprotein IIIa [GPIIIa]) integrin, GPIIIa49-66. This antibody induces thrombocytopenia by a novel complement-independent mechanism in which platelets are fragmented by antibody-induced generation of H2O2 derived from the interaction of platelet nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase and 12-lipoxygenase. To examine whether sharing of epitope between host and parasite may be responsible for this immunodominant epitope, we screened for antibody-reactive peptides capable of inhibiting platelet lysis and oxidation in vitro, using a filamentous phage display 7-mer peptide library. Fourteen of these phage-peptide clones were identified. Five shared close sequence similarity with GPIIIa49-66, as expected. Ten were molecular mimics with close sequence similarity to HIV-1 proteins nef, gag, env, and pol. Seven were synthesized as 10-mers from their known HIV-1 sequence and found to inhibit anti-GPIIIa49-66-induced platelet oxidation/fragmentation in vitro. Three rabbit antibodies raised against these peptides induced platelet oxidation/fragmentation in vitro and thrombocytopenia in vivo when passively transferred into mice. One of the peptides shared a known epitope region with HIV-1 protein nef and was derived from a variant region of the protein. These data provide strong support for molecular mimicry in HIV-1-immunologic thrombocytopenia within polymorphic regions of HIV-1 proteins. A known epitope of nef is particularly incriminated.

0 Followers
 · 
139 Views
  • Source
    Biomédica: revista del Instituto Nacional de Salud 04/2011; 31(1):35. DOI:10.7705/biomedica.v31i1.334 · 0.62 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: 1) To describe autoimmune diseases (AD) in HIV-infected people; 2) to perform a literature review concerning this issue. 52 HIV-infected patients that presented an AD in 14 medical departments in Paris and Ile-de-France area were retrospectively included in this study. The ADs were vasculitis (11), immune cytopenias (8), rheumatic diseases (8), lupus (7), sarcoidosis (7), thyroid diseases (6), hepatic diseases (5), antiphospholipid syndrome (4). Four patients presented 2 ADs. In 5 patients the AD preceded HIV infection, in 14 HIV infection was diagnosed at the same time as the AD and 34 were HIV-infected when they developed an AD. 40 ADs (80%) occurred in patients with a CD4 T lymphocyte count of more than 200/mm3. Cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia occurred only in patients severely immunodepressed. In five patients (a vasculitis case, a sarcoidosis case, three thyroid disease cases) the AD presented as a form of immune restoration inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). Some ADs allowed HIV-infection diagnosis at a stage of moderate immune deficiency (vasculitis, antiphospholipid syndrome, immune thrombocytopenia). 37 patients received immunosuppressant treatments with good tolerance. These results confirm in a large series of patients previous data concerning autoimmune diseases occurrence in HIV-infected people. In the HAART era, when HIV-infected people are treated more and more early, autoimmune diseases can occur, mainly at the phase of immunological recovery. HIV infection should not limit immunosuppressant treatment use.
    Autoimmunity reviews 04/2014; DOI:10.1016/j.autrev.2014.04.005 · 7.10 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by antibody-mediated platelet destruction. The platelet, as an accessible target, has made ITP an attractive disorder in the study of autoimmunity. However, the pathogenesis of ITP has proven complex with diverse pre-existing challenges to the immune system in the form of infection, genetic predisposition, underlying autoimmune repertoire, inhibition of platelet production, perturbations of cell mediated affector and effector pathways, sequestered harbors within lymphoid organs, and responsiveness to intervention. This chapter surveys key new insights into the pathogenesis of ITP and attempts to integrate them into a model that may serve as a template for future investigation.
    La Presse Médicale 03/2014; DOI:10.1016/j.lpm.2014.01.010 · 1.17 Impact Factor