Article

Origin and evolution of a chimeric fusion gene in Drosophila subobscura, D. madeirensis and D. guanche.

Center for Population Biology, University of California, Davis, 95616, USA.
Genetics (Impact Factor: 4.87). 06/2005; 170(1):207-19. DOI: 10.1534/genetics.104.037283
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT An understanding of the mutational and evolutionary mechanisms underlying the emergence of novel genes is critical to studies of phenotypic and genomic evolution. Here we describe a new example of a recently formed chimeric fusion gene that occurs in Drosophila guanche, D. madeirensis, and D. subobscura. This new gene, which we name Adh-Twain, resulted from an Adh mRNA that retrotransposed into the Gapdh-like gene, CG9010. Adh-Twain is transcribed; its 5' promoters and transcription patterns appear similar to those of CG9010. Population genetic and phylogenetic analyses suggest that the amino acid sequence of Adh-Twain evolved rapidly via directional selection shortly after it arose. Its more recent history, however, is characterized by slower evolution consistent with increasing functional constraints. We present a model for the origin of this new gene and discuss genetic and evolutionary factors affecting the evolution of new genes and functions.

0 Followers
 · 
69 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Members of the pathogenesis-related protein 1 (PR-1) family are well-known markers of plant defence responses, forming part of the arsenal of the secreted proteins produced on pathogen recognition. Here, we report the identification of two cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) PR-1s that are fused to transmembrane regions and serine/threonine kinase domains, in a manner characteristic of receptor-like kinases (RLKs). These proteins (TcPR-1f and TcPR-1g) were named PR-1 receptor kinases (PR-1RKs). Phylogenetic analysis of RLKs and PR-1 proteins from cacao indicated that PR-1RKs originated from a fusion between sequences encoding PR-1 and the kinase domain of a LecRLK (Lectin Receptor-Like Kinase). Retrotransposition marks surround TcPR-1f, suggesting that retrotransposition was involved in the origin of PR-1RKs. Genes with a similar domain architecture to cacao PR-1RKs were found in rice (Oryza sativa), barrel medic (Medicago truncatula) and a nonphototrophic bacterium (Herpetosiphon aurantiacus). However, their kinase domains differed from those found in LecRLKs, indicating the occurrence of convergent evolution. TcPR-1g expression was up-regulated in the biotrophic stage of witches’ broom disease, suggesting a role for PR-1RKs during cacao defence responses.We hypothesize that PR-1RKs transduce a defence signal by interacting with a PR-1 ligand.
    Molecular Plant Pathology 04/2013; · 4.49 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Members of the pathogenesis-related protein 1 (PR-1) family are well-known markers of plant defence responses, forming part of the arsenal of the secreted proteins produced on pathogen recognition. Here, we report the identification of two cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) PR-1s that are fused to transmembrane regions and serine/threonine kinase domains, in a manner characteristic of receptor-like kinases (RLKs). These proteins (TcPR-1f and TcPR-1g) were named PR-1 receptor kinases (PR-1RKs). Phylogenetic analysis of RLKs and PR-1 proteins from cacao indicated that PR-1RKs originated from a fusion between sequences encoding PR-1 and the kinase domain of a LecRLK (Lectin Receptor-Like Kinase). Retrotransposition marks surround TcPR-1f, suggesting that retrotransposition was involved in the origin of PR-1RKs. Genes with a similar domain architecture to cacao PR-1RKs were found in rice (Oryza sativa), barrel medic (Medicago truncatula) and a nonphototrophic bacterium (Herpetosiphon aurantiacus). However, their kinase domains differed from those found in LecRLKs, indicating the occurrence of convergent evolution. TcPR-1g expression was up-regulated in the biotrophic stage of witches' broom disease, suggesting a role for PR-1RKs during cacao defence responses. We hypothesize that PR-1RKs transduce a defence signal by interacting with a PR-1 ligand.
    Molecular Plant Pathology 04/2013; DOI:10.1111/mpp.12028 · 4.49 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The study of the evolution of novel genes generally focuses on the formation of new coding sequences. However, equally important in the evolution of novel functional genes are the formation of regulatory regions that allow the expression of the genes and the effects of the new genes in the organism as well. Herein, we discuss the current knowledge on the evolution of novel functional genes, and we examine in more detail the youngest genes discovered. We examine the existing data on a very recent and rapidly evolving cluster of duplicated genes, the Sdic gene cluster. This cluster of genes is an excellent model for the evolution of novel genes, as it is very recent and may still be in the process of evolving.
    07/2012; 2012:821645. DOI:10.1155/2012/821645

Preview

Download
0 Downloads
Available from