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Rapid analysis of trace levels of antibiotic polyether ionophores in surface water by solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography with ion trap tandem mass spectrometric detection. J Chromatogr A

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1372, USA.
Journal of Chromatography A (Impact Factor: 4.26). 03/2005; 1065(2):187-98. DOI: 10.1016/j.chroma.2004.12.091
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The occurrence of antibiotics in surface and ground water is an emerging area of interest due to the potential impacts of these compounds on the environment. This paper details a rapid, sensitive and reliable analytical method for the determination of monensin A and B, salinomycin and narasin A in surface water using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and liquid chromatography-ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) with selected reaction monitoring (SRM). Several product ions as sodiated sodium salts for MS-MS detection have been identified and documented with their proposed fragmentation pathways. Statistical analysis for determination of the method detection limit (MDL), accuracy and precision of the method is described. The average recovery of ionophore antibiotics in pristine and wastewater-influenced water was 96.0+/-8.3% and 93.8+/-9.1%, respectively. No matrix effect was seen with the surface water. MDL was between 0.03 and 0.05 microg/L for these antibiotic compounds in the surface water. The accuracy and day-to-day variation of method fell within acceptable ranges. The method is applied to evaluate to the occurrence of these compounds in a small watershed in Northern Colorado. The method verified the presence of trace levels of these antibiotics in urban and agricultural land use dominated sections of the river.

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    • "O in this study was comparable to those detected in Yangtze Estuary (Yan et al., 2013) and in Mekong River of Vietnam (Managaki et al., 2007), but was one order of magnitude lower than that detected in Victoria Harbour of Hongkong (Minh et al., 2009). The SAL concentration in this study was higher than that detected in Poudre River of USA (Cha et al., 2005). The TMP concentration in this study was similar to those detected in Yantai Bay (Zhang et al., 2013a) and Bohai Sea (Zhang et al., 2013b), but lower than that detected in Laizhou Bay (Zhang et al., 2012). "
    Dataset: Chen H- MPB
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    • "O in this study was comparable to those detected in Yangtze Estuary (Yan et al., 2013) and in Mekong River of Vietnam (Managaki et al., 2007), but was one order of magnitude lower than that detected in Victoria Harbour of Hongkong (Minh et al., 2009). The SAL concentration in this study was higher than that detected in Poudre River of USA (Cha et al., 2005). The TMP concentration in this study was similar to those detected in Yantai Bay (Zhang et al., 2013a) and Bohai Sea (Zhang et al., 2013b), but lower than that detected in Laizhou Bay (Zhang et al., 2012). "
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    • "Detection at these sites could be due to treatment of dairy sludge or slurry at the WWTPs; similar results were reported by Cha et al. (2005), who also detected monensin and narasin (approximately 30 ng L "
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