Article

Resurrecting treatment histories of dead patients

University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association (Impact Factor: 30.39). 05/2005; 293(13):1591-2; author reply 1592. DOI: 10.1001/jama.293.13.1591-b
Source: PubMed
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