Article

Inheritance of hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia in Quarter Horses.

Department of Population Health and Reproduction, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA.
American Journal of Veterinary Research (Impact Factor: 1.35). 04/2005; 66(3):437-42. DOI: 10.2460/ajvr.2005.66.437
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To assess heritability and mode of inheritance for hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia (HERDA) in Quarter Horses.
1,295 horses with Quarter Horse bloodlines, including 58 horses affected with HERDA.
Horses were classified as affected or unaffected or as undetermined when data were insufficient to assess phenotype. Pedigree data were analyzed to determine the probable mode of inheritance. Heritability was estimated by use of Bayesian statistical methods.
Heritability (mean+/-SD) of HERDA was estimated to be 0.38+/-0.13, with both sexes having an equal probability of being affected. Results for evaluation of the pedigrees were consistent with a single Mendelian autosomal recessive mode of inheritance.
HERDA in Quarter Horses is an inherited disease, and affected horses are more likely to produce affected offspring. An autosomal recessive mode of inheritance should be considered by people making breeding decisions involving Quarter Horses when a first-degree relative has been confirmed with HERDA or has produced affected offspring. In addition, breeders whose horses have produced affected offspring can reduce the likelihood of producing affected horses in the future by avoiding inbreeding.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
102 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Despite remarkable advances in human genetics and other genetic model systems, the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, remains a powerful experimental tool to probe with ease the inner workings of a myriad of biological and pathological processes, even when evolutionary forces impart apparent divergences to some of such processes. The understanding of such evolutionary differences provides mechanistic insights into genotype-phenotype correlations underpinning biological processes across metazoans. The pioneering work developed by the William Pak laboratory for the past four decades, and the work of others, epitomize the notion of how the Drosophila system breaks new fertile ground or complements research fields of high scientific and medical relevance. Among the three major genetic complementation groups produced by the Pak's laboratory and impairing distinct facets of photoreceptor neuronal function, the nina group (ninaA, …., ninaJ) selectively affects the biogenesis of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), mediating the photoconversion and transduction of light stimuli. Among the nina genes identified, ninaA arguably assumes heightened significance for several reasons. First, it presents unique physiological selectivity toward the biogenesis of a subset of GPCRs, a standalone biological manifestation yet to be discerned for most mammalian homologues of NinaA. Second, NinaA belongs to a family of proteins, immunophilins, which are the primary targets for immunosuppressive drugs at the therapeutic forefront of a multitude of medical conditions. Third, NinaA closest homologue, cyclophilin B (CyPB/PPIB), is an immunophilin whose loss-of-function was found recently to cause osteogenesis imperfecta in the human. This report highlights advances made by studies on some members of immunophilins, the cyclophilins. Finally, it reexamines critically data and dogmas derived from past and recent genetic, structural, biological, and pathological studies on NinaA and few other cyclophilins that support some of such paradigms to be less than definite and advance our understanding of the roles of cyclophilins in cell function, disease, and therapeutic interventions.
    Journal of neurogenetics 02/2012; 26(2):132-43. · 0.73 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A 6-week-old Warmblood colt foal was presented for investigation of multiple haematoma formation in various locations, poor wound healing and abnormal scar formation. Based on the history and clinical presentation of hyperextensible skin with prolonged skin tenting, the foal was diagnosed with cutaneous asthenia and euthanased because of the poor prognosis. Histopathological and electron microscopic findings were inconclusive. This is the first case report of cutaneous asthenia in a Warmblood horse in Australia. Cutaneous asthenia is reviewed with particular reference to hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia and its similarities and differences to the case presented.
    Australian Veterinary Journal 03/2011; 89(3):77-81. · 0.92 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The rate-limiting step of folding of the collagen triple helix is catalyzed by cyclophilin B (CypB). The G6R mutation in cyclophilin B found in the American Quarter Horse leads to autosomal recessive hyperelastosis cutis, also known as hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia. The mutant protein shows small structural changes in the region of the mutation at the side opposite the catalytic domain of CypB. The peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase activity of the mutant CypB is normal when analyzed in vitro. However, the biosynthesis of type I collagen in affected horse fibroblasts shows a delay in folding and secretion and a decrease in hydroxylysine and glucosyl-galactosyl hydroxylysine. This leads to changes in the structure of collagen fibrils in tendon, similar to those observed in P3H1 null mice. In contrast to cyclophilin B null mice, where little 3-hydroxylation was found in type I collagen, 3-hydroxylation of type I collagen in affected horses is normal. The mutation disrupts the interaction of cyclophilin B with the P-domain of calreticulin, with lysyl hydroxylase 1, and probably other proteins, such as the formation of the P3H1·CypB·cartilage-associated protein complex, resulting in less effective catalysis of the rate-limiting step in collagen folding in the rough endoplasmic reticulum.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 05/2012; 287(26):22253-65. · 4.65 Impact Factor